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Topic: How important is the way you hold your hook?  (Read 2763 times)
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NatACT
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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2011 04:31:50 AM »

I had to laugh when I saw this - my parents sent me to a finishing school (late 80's early 90's) and while my grandmother taught me to crochet as a young girl, she had apparently taught me to hold my hook the "wrong way", not the way a "young lady" should hold her hook.

I believe (and I could be wrong, its been a while since I was at school, lol) that in the time of the Irish Famine (19th century) The Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary taught young girls and women Irish Crochet as a way of supplementing their household incomes. Many of the Sister's and ladies of mean's would hold their hooks as you would hold a pencil (writing chalks or quills perhaps) but for those who hadn't learnt to hold writing tools it was easier and faster for them to hold their hooks as we would hold knitting needles.

I don't know how accurate that is, but I would only hold my hook "pencil" style while my teacher was looking, lol... I find it too hard to hold like that, But I dare say should my old teachers see how far I've come with crochet they would be proud of me. Smiley

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Kitiza
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2011 04:39:31 AM »

At school the teacher taught me to hold the hook like a lady and I learned it OK. Then I had some years that I wasn't crocheting at all and when I started again I learned (by myself) to hold the hook like a knife.  Tongue My relatives always laugh at me when they see how I hold the hook and the yarn but it works for me.  Grin
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skittlebub
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2011 03:31:07 PM »

My MIL always tells me I hold the hook wrong, but then we both bought a crochet magazine series & it said that both ways are right.
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TheCRPSGirl
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2011 04:38:20 PM »

I went to my first crochet night last night and discovered I do a kind of strange knife hold.  I tried the pencil hold but it did not work with my illness.  The knife was better but I had to adjust it. 
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darski
« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2011 09:11:56 AM »

I find it interesting that this discussion is still going on.  I was taught the pencil hold as a child but I just migrated to the knife hold without thinking about it.  Given all that I have done in crochet :

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dudsfordoras/

I don't see any reason to listen to those who work differently.  Can't we all just get along Smiley
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drowninginpaper
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2011 09:00:08 PM »

I taught myself to crochet from the Reader's Digest Needlework book, which said that both ways are perfectly acceptable. I felt most comfortable with the knife hold. I tried the pencil hold once for kicks, but I just can't do it, I feel like I can't control my yarn.
I don't really think it matters, as long as the end product turns out well.
On a side note, how do you all hold your working yarn? I have a strange way of holding that I can't really describe right now because I don't have any yarn on me.
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skittlebub
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2011 11:24:27 PM »

Over pointer, under middle, over ring, held with pinkie. If that makes any sense
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Selnith
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« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2011 12:44:14 AM »

i usually hold my hook pencil hold cause that's what my Nanna taught me, but i have been known to switch to knife hold for sections of patterns, usually back post work, dunno why
as for the yarn i think i just keep it tucked in with my left forefinger, as i'm apparently hyper mobile in quite a few of my joints my fingers go further than they should and i have seen people struggle to control the yarn with so little contact as i have with it
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FurysSin
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« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2011 01:04:02 PM »

I didn't even realize there were different ways to hold hooks. Looking at some of my small projects versus my larger projects, I noticed I tend to switch back and forth between pencil and knife depending on how tight I want my stitches. I will say that my crochet hold helped me pick up needles for knitting.
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