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Topic: Am I increasing too fast for socks?  (Read 333 times)
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ragdoll193
« on: May 25, 2011 06:08:22 PM »

I am making my first pair of socks (EVER) and I FINALLY think I understand the toe. I am working toe up, using Judy's magic cast on http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEspring06/FEATmagiccaston.html and I got all into making the toe and forgot to knit rows in between increase rows!

I am currently at 44 stitches when I started with 28, so 4 rows of increases. Should I keep going as I have been, increasing every row, or should I frog back (but I FINALLY got it!), or should I start knitting rows between increases now?

I know that whatever option I take, I need to do the same for the second sock. What would you all suggest I do?
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Riki
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2011 06:35:51 PM »

Actually, some patterns have you increasing on every row for most of the tow and then every other row for a few more rows - and I like that look better. My feeling is that you keep going until the sharpest part of the toe is done, then go to every other row for the final 3-4 increases.

Also, really the key question is how does it look to you? The main thing to me is that I don't like a pointy toe. If you started with 12 stitches or so, your toe won't be pointy so you should be fine.

In other words - no need to frog!!!!
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Tephra
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2011 06:58:56 PM »

The toe I use on most of my socks is to cast on about one third of the total stitches I want for the sock (so 20 stitches for a sock that will have 60 stitches in a round), then increase every round for the next third (to 40 sts) and then every other round for the last third (to 60). This makes a short, rounded, toe on the sock, which works well with my short toes and wide foot.

So, yes, you can just start increasing every other row now, just make sure to write down what you did so your other sock will match (if you aren't doing both at once like I tend to do).
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ragdoll193
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2011 06:35:08 AM »

Thanks, guys!

I am actually frogging this sock a bit... I made it far too big! My gauge was what the pattern called for (8 sts/in) and I was supposed to increase to 72 sts. I made it to 60 and it's HUGE! If anything, I was knitting tighter than usual, too so I have no clue what happened!
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