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Topic: Turquoise clay necklaces and earings  (Read 1475 times)
Tags for this thread: airdry_clay , cold_porcelain , cornstarch_clay , homemade_clay  Add new tag
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lunaholic
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« on: May 12, 2011 08:25:08 AM »

Hi!
Since there are some birthdays coming up, I thought of doing some necklaces and earrings for my friends. Sorry for the bad quality of photos, hope you like them. They're done with clay, and some of them coloured with metallic ink, and decorated with tiny beads.












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Diane B.
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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2011 09:41:29 AM »

Cool!...and you even have some "turquoise" that have inlays--love that look.

Are you using polymer clay to make these, or an air-dry clay?  If you're not already using polymer clay there are loads of possibilities for faux turquoise** you'd really like to play around with, I'm sure (and come visit us on the Polymer Clay boards too).
And have you ever used the metallic powders (mica ones like Pearl Ex, or real-metal ones) instead of the metallic inks/paints?  Or do they have those where you are?

Your friends are going to be very happy  Grin

Diane B.

** http://glassattic.com/polymer/faux-turquoise_wood.htm

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POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
lunaholic
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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2011 11:54:45 AM »

Hi diane! ^^

The clay is a handmade glycerin-maizena clay that's airdried: still haven't got a separate oven to do the creations. I'd love to work with polymer clay, since everyone tells me that it's easier to work with than with my clay. But I can't cook it. ^^;
I'm still not very used to craftster, where is the polymer clay board? Tongue
I recently found that metallic ink, from Pelikan, called prisma colour:
http://picture.yatego.com/images/44fbe05606be97.4/Prismacolor.jpg

The metallic powder you talk about, I never found it here. Maybe I should take a closer look.
Taking now a look at the link, thanks for the advice!
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lunaholic
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2011 05:24:42 AM »

tiny update with some other of the same style:
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Diane B.
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« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2011 11:00:33 AM »

.
Quote
The clay is a handmade glycerin-maizena clay that's airdried: still haven't got a separate oven to do the creations.


Aha, so you used what's also called "cold porcelain" air-dry clay.  Maizena, I guess, is a main brand in Europe of what we call cornstarch in the U.S. (and corn flour in the UK)?

Lots of cool things can be done with various kinds of air-dry clays, and a lot of people outside the U.S. seem to be using the cornstarch-based ones as well as others.

You might also want to try homemade air-dry clays like bread clay (greatest detail) since you can make yourself:
http://www.google.com/images?q=bread+clay
http://www.google.com/search?q=bread+clay
and salt dough clay:
http://www.google.com/images?q=salt+dough
http://www.google.com/search?q=salt+dough

Or some of the paper-based (not grain-based like those above) air-dry clays sold at stores (in your area too?) or made at home:
Creative Paperclay:
http://www.google.com/images?q=Creative+Paperclay+jewelry
Hearty or Makins:
http://www.google.com/images?q=Hearty+clay
http://www.google.com/images?q=Makins+clay
papier mache paste clay: 
http://images.google.com/images?q=papier+mache+paste+pulp+clay

Quote
I'd love to work with polymer clay, since everyone tells me that it's easier to work with than with my clay. But I can't cook it. ^^;

Polymer clays will create more detail, not shrink while drying, not have to be sealed, come pre-colored if you want, etc, but the main thing is that there are many techniques that can be done with it that can't be done with air-dry clays.  Many of the same "shaped" things can be done with both though, even some parts of the faux turquoise techniques.

As for curing the clay, there are other ways besides using a home oven or a toaster oven (you don't have a home oven?).  You can check those out on the Baking page at my site if you're interested:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/baking.htm ...click on the category near end of list called Other Ways to Cure

Quote
I'm still not very used to craftster, where is the polymer clay board?

Here are the two main boards for polymer clay...looks like you might have even posted there before but you may not have known how you got there:
Completed Projects: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?board=238.0
Discussions & Questions: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?board=239.0
 
Quote
I recently found that metallic ink, from Pelikan, called prisma colour:
http://picture.yatego.com/images/44fbe05606be97.4/Prismacolor.jpg

Looks like that's an "interference" version of a metallic-colored acrylic paint (thinned down to ink consistency)?  There are other metallic paints and "inks" too, and you can also make your own with the metallic powders:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/paints.htm (> Acrylic >> Metallic, Pearlescent)

Quote
The metallic powder you talk about, I never found it here. Maybe I should take a closer look.

Both the mica-based metallic powders and the real-metal-based ones should be available in most areas of Europe, and esp. online.  Try craft stores, art supply stores, and sometimes even (house) paint stores and hardware stores since they sometimes put them into colored paint/etc for a bit of sparkle.
There's more info on the brand names of the particular types on this page too so you can know what you're looking for:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/powders_metallicwaxes.htm

P.S.  You might also want to check out the Inlay and Onlay pages of my site for more ideas about "things you can stick into clay":
http://glassattic.com/polymer/onlay.htm (esp > Non-Clay Onlays)
http://glassattic.com/polymer/mosaics_inlay.htm (> Inlays & Others)

« Last Edit: May 14, 2011 11:13:11 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
lunaholic
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2011 02:07:46 PM »

Oh wow, so much information, thanks so much!!!
I'm taking a look at it.
I have oven, but since polymer is toxic, I prefer not to use it since I cook with it. But as I read you can also boil it in water? that could be a very good alternative! :O
So, one question.. with my homemade clay, as you also noticed, is more difficult to work with since if I put piece together they don't 'stick together', and it dries out to fast as to do complicated pieces (like for example, as you notice, forming the unicorn was difficult, since as done the legs, the neck part was already drying out and was difficult to form)... I hope I will not have that problem with polymer xDDD
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Diane B.
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2011 11:34:05 AM »

Quote
I have oven, but since polymer is toxic, I prefer not to use it since I cook with it.

First, polymer clay is not toxic.  You can see the seal of the Arts and Crafts Council on every package stating that it's non-toxic and safe for kids down to 3 (an artificial dividing line since kids that young could theoretically eat pounds of it and perhaps cause some kind of problem we don't yet know).

Secondly, it is recommended though (just to be uber-safe) that if someone is doing a LOT of clay (like doing production work for a business), or has a very small unventilated area they're doing the curing in, or perhaps if they have lung diseases, etc, that they just do the baking in a room they aren't in, or that they use a "completely enclosed" baking method which keeps all of the fumes/etc inside a container so none at all gets into the air or oven. 
And most clayers who begin to do polymer clay on a fairly regular basis will usually purchase a separate toaster oven and even put it in a separate room, or a microwave/convection oven (even better, but using only the Convection mode), for curing their clay.
Those methods are described on that same Baking page I linked to below.

Lastly, there are some questions about all kinds of things in our environments, some of which have to do with plastics and some with stuff that gets into the air we all breathe, etc.  But many of those things are already present, and you also wouldn't be exposing yourself to much of it at all compared to the things you're already being exposed to, just using as a hobby.

Quote
But as I read you can also boil it in water? that could be a very good alternative! :O

You can boil it in water in various ways.  There are some people feel that doesn't give as complete a cure as a higher temp than 212 F, but others point out that polymer clay is a thermoplastic and therefore the curing will go on at lower temps and just take a longer time at lower temps.  Thickness of an item will matter too for how quickly it would be cured all the way to the center. 

Some items might be too dimensional for even simmering water though (if you had a long nose, for example, on a mini-head), or you might have inlays that could get pushed out, or you might have colored powders on the surface that could get rubbed off or dissolved, etc.

Check out all those "other ways to cure" for the method that suits your particular items if you can't just use the "completely enclosed" baking methods.

Quote
my homemade clay is more difficult to work with since if I put piece together they don't 'stick together', and it dries out to fast as to do complicated pieces... I hope I will not have that problem with polymer

Polymer clay won't "dry out" at all since it's not a water-based clay.  It's oil-based, so it will "firm up" a bit when it's not warm or recently stretched but wont' harden unless it's exposed to too much heat or UV light. 

Polymer clay is also very good for getting fine detail, though some brands do work a bit better for that than others (usually the firmer ones like Kato Polyclay and FimoClassic...some other lines or brands of polymer clay can be brittle after curing in any thin or projecting detailed areas though like the 3 main "Sculpeys" and Craftsmart/Bakeshop:
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=366723.msg4307846#msg4307846 ).

As for sticking to itself, polymer clay will do that nicely if both pieces are raw and if there's just sufficient contact between the parts.  There are other ways to get it to stick, or to connect added parts, though if that ever isn't enough, or if one part is raw and the other already baked. 
Check out this page for more info on that:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/glues-Diluent.htm (especially under Some Bonding Techniques)

HTH,
Diane B.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2011 11:46:20 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
lunaholic
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« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2011 05:41:48 AM »

Wow, I love your page!
I was reading a lot there lately, and am really interested at trying out polymer...
I heard that glue is not always needed, for example, when doing 'hair' for a character, or putting bead into the clay... am I right? so in polymer this works, in my clay, I have to put clay or they fall out xD

anyway, thank you sooo much for your information!!
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Diane B.
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« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2011 10:15:19 AM »

Glue is not needed in many situations with polymer clay, though something adhesive or something that creates a "mechanical hold" sometimes is.  Just depends on several factors.

For pressing inlays into a raw sheet or shape of polymer clay, for example, often just the fact that the items are put below the level of the surface (or at least part of the items are) means that any stress put on them can't be as great since they're in their own "ditches" and/or not much is sticking out to get pushed on.  The mechanical hold of the sides of the custom-ditches also holds them in, even if they get pushed from the sides, and because polymer clay can do great sharp detail those ditches will probably be tighter to the items than using other kinds of clay.  Polymer clay will also bond at least a bit to many other plastics when heated.

(Some items that can't take even the low heat required to cure polymer clay are pushed into the clay to create a customized impression, removed, then glued back into the cured clay.)

Another kind of mechanical hold with raw clay is created when a seed bead or item that has smaller or flatter parts on the outside is pressed into the clay.  Some of the raw clay will get pushed up into the holes of seed beads, for example, or some clay will kind of rise up and partly get on top of any edges that are flatter or smaller.

And for things like eye pins, etc, the shanks can simply be bent or zigzagged then placed into a slit or hole of polymer clay before having the clay snugged back around them, and baked.  That way no glue is necessary for adding them and the attachment is extremely secure.

For just placing something on the top of the surface polymer clay though (without impressing at all), generally some kind of adhesive or mechanical hold like wiring/etc will need to be used or that kind of thing won't stick (unless it's one of the kinds of plastic that will bond to polymer clay when heated).
And if the clay has already been cured when things are added, they'll need adhesive, mechanical holds, or perhaps to be reheated.
For seed beads in particular, especially if there are a lot of them in an area, many people will go ahead and coat the seed bead area or the entire piece with a clear finish and that will act like a kind of skin that holds everything on even better.

(For adhering metallic powders and leaf and some colorants, they'll automatically stick if the clay is raw, but not once it's cured.)

Other adhesives can be used on polymer clays though --sometimes when raw, sometimes only when cured-- and the strongest for clay-to-clay or some other things to clay will be liquid polymer clay.  It must be heated to cure though, and it's not tacky.

If you want to read about the other adhesives, check out the rest of that Glues page I linked to before:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/glues-Diluent.htm
And there's more on all kinds of ways to use liquid polymer clays here:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/LiquidSculpey.htm

As for "hair," that can be done in myriad ways when using polymer clay.  
The hair itself can be clay. Or hair of other materials can be used for polymer clay heads.  The latter can be done by making a "wig," or embedding the ends of groups of hairs in the head, or gluing bands of hair to the head, etc.
Check out those possibilities from this page at the site:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/sculpting_body_and_tools.htm ( > Hair)

HTH,
Diane B.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2011 10:21:19 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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