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Topic: 16 yo son wants to be an artist  (Read 3234 times)
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thespacequeen87
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2011 03:03:18 PM »

i briefly looked in to tattooing after leaving college and wanted to stress that tattoo art is heavily based in fine art, so i totally second him trying out drawing 101 and fine art courses, if for anything, inspiration. and all artists are their own worst critic, so HELL YEAH for you guys supporting him. you guys sound awesome, and i hope he works it out. it hard to do anything in the fine art world these days, but sounds like he loves it so go him Smiley
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millymollymandy
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2011 11:17:09 AM »

the person who put about deviant art is 100% correct, and i would look on facebook, there are tonnes of tattooists, tattoo art etc on pages on there. i have learnt loads about tattoo art off those types of pages. not because i want to become a tattoo artist in particular, but because i am just interested in tattoo art, graffiti art, and art of all kinds, and i get to interact with all sorts of people, including people like kat von d (tell him if he doesnt know already, that yes, she has her own page on fb, along with other famous and semi famous tattoo artists) etc on facebook. just thought this may be of help, coz (i am actually an artist in the traditional sense) in the same token that i have learnt loads about all these other types of art form, i would have thought that this would also be advantageous to him especially Smiley
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msminnamouse
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2012 09:44:12 PM »

In today's economy, or even when it wasn't so difficult out there, artists are having a very hard time making a living out of their crafts. Even if they're incredibly talented. For his sake, I would try to get him to have something he can fall back on instead of his art being his primary means of sustaining himself. So that means, he should pursue his art but also something else more in demand so he can eat.
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« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2012 08:12:43 AM »

In today's economy, or even when it wasn't so difficult out there, artists are having a very hard time making a living out of their crafts. Even if they're incredibly talented. For his sake, I would try to get him to have something he can fall back on instead of his art being his primary means of sustaining himself. So that means, he should pursue his art but also something else more in demand so he can eat.

I would just like to point out that the economy has *never* been prime for artists.  Artists have always (not that I'm saying they will always, nor should always) had to struggle to sustain themselves from their art.  Even the famous masters had a hard time making money during their life time. 

Also, to point out, a lot of very wealthy artists around today are not particularly talented or skilled.  Rather, they had good connections, good business practices, amazing self-promotion skills (to the point of politicians, if anyone has had to deal with big art dealers and curators you know what I mean), creates lowest common denominator art, had the drive to persevere regardless, or all of the above. 

But, most importantly, coming from a young adult, who went to school for art (and relatively sustains themselves off said art), please do not encourage or push them going into something just to make money.  Art requires your attention.  It is incredibly difficult to try to good art while holding a full time job (let alone try to market, promote, apply for grants, submissions calls, residences...) (and I can't even imagine trying to do all this while having an entirely other career).  Not only that, but I'm pretty damn sure that he knows that he is going to struggle for money for a while (possibly for a very long while).  I knew this as a teenager.  I was lucky, my parents never tried to push me into a different career path.  But I know other artist's that did have to struggle against their parent's fears of financial instability (or possibly their parent's own ambitious preferences).  You telling them (or even gently suggesting to them) about the financial issues and suggesting a better paying job will not make them feel happy (or even be appreciative of your concern) it will make them feel as though you do not believe that they can make it as an artist, or that they are not good enough. 
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msminnamouse
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2012 12:34:50 PM »

Quote
I would just like to point out that the economy has *never* been prime for artists.
Yes, that's why I wrote, "In today's economy, or even when it wasn't so difficult out there, artists are having a very hard time making a living out of their crafts."

Quote
Also, to point out, a lot of very wealthy artists around today are not particularly talented or skilled.
Yes, which is why I also wrote, "Even if they're incredibly talented."

Quote
But, most importantly, coming from a young adult, who went to school for art (and relatively sustains themselves off said art), please do not encourage or push them going into something just to make money.
YOU are very lucky, then. But to the OP, I have this to say: By all means, spare his feelings (if you really think he's overly sensitive and would be offended at your voicing your concerns for his welfare even when you make a point to recognize what is probably very real talent) at the very probable chance that he won't have enough money to care for himself. Unless you're fine with always financially supporting him or having the tax payers do it.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2012 12:46:28 PM by msminnamouse » THIS ROCKS   Logged
goddessgarb
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« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2012 03:59:02 PM »

My 15 yr old wants to design video games and draws and then computer generates characters, so I am figuring out how best to support him there.  I don't feel the parent has to be the harsh critic.  Unconditional honest support seems like a better fit there.  I would ask him what KIND of criticism he wants when he shows me something.  I know as an artist that from my partner, who is not an art expert of any kind, I want to know if she likes it, and why, and I will tell her if I'm showing her something I have doubts about, and I want her to tell me if she agrees it's not hitting the mark, or not. 

If he can't take classes, you can get books.  Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is the best drawing book there is.  For me, I prefer to view tons of art and critique my own work rather than open it up to other people's critiques.  If I think something isn't working, then I'll ask and that's when I want to receive more constructive criticism.  Otherwise, I just want to hear from those who actually like it.  Wink  With him, if I'm not qualified to judge the work (which in the case of characters for video games, I am not) I keep my feedback to what I can say something about, such as color use, proportion, creativity.  I mostly look for what there is to love about it unless he's asking for advice, as well as taking it seriously and helping him learn about things such as supplies, techniques, etc.
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msminnamouse
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2012 09:43:02 PM »

We also have to remember that his work will be on some one else's skin, pretty permanent, even with removal the scar is in the outline of the tattoo. If he can't take criticism in this line of work, then he's not cut out for this line of work. I don't know him and I can't speak to whether he can accept criticism of not.

If he ruins a canvas or something else, then that's fine and doesn't harm anyone.
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UnRuli
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« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2012 10:52:03 AM »

First and foremost he will need to take some art classes.  These classes will probably be pushing him to draw realistically but even if that is not the "style" he is interested in he should take it seriously because a good foundation will be necessary.  Learning to draw realistically teaches how to match shapes, values and colors so that he can draw his images with more accuracy.

As a college illustration professor (I graduated with my BFA in Illustration with a minor in Painting in May and started Grad school in July.....I've been teaching since last August) the most common thing I see is students who are interested in cartooning who do not take their drawing and/or life drawing classes seriously. They think that because they're interested in drawing in a cartoon style that drawing realistically is of no use to them......WRONG!  Those are the students who wind up not able to cartoon well!  We have a number of students go through our Illustration program who wind up in the tattoo business.....it's the one who take ALL of their classes seriously that wind up doing well.

If your local college doesn't have a really good art program he may want to consider going elsewhere because a poor art program won't get him anywhere.

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
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GlindaBunny
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2012 02:32:49 PM »

I think lots of professions have a rough time in this economy.  I think it's great that he's passionate about his chosen line of work.  I like the ideas of other posters of encouraging him to network online, learn more about art and tattoos, and keep that passion alive.
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Sparkledust
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2012 09:55:39 AM »

With great support from a loving family there is only one way to go.

I think the hardest battle is believing in yourself, once he starts working as you mention he'll know if it feels right, and then I'm sure he'll be well away, good luck to him and anyone that ventures into doing what they want to do, not what they are told to do!
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