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Topic: Der Goldene Schnitt (1941) - pic heavy  (Read 7223 times)
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Ruby Copperhead
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« on: February 12, 2011 11:04:49 AM »

This is my favourite craft book, even if I never have made anything from it. But I like to watch the pictures.
The book is called Der Goldene Schnitt from the year 1941 and aims to provide the average housewife with patterns for every piece of clothing her family might ever need. The patterns are given on postcards at the end of the book, and they are meant to be enlarged from those.
So, what did the fashionable 1941 housewife wear?





Ski and Bike Wear


Underwear (and hip and leg proportions to crush the self confidence of every woman)


The classic Sunday wear that every kid wore (because it looked preppy and was almost indestructable): The Sailor suit (anime fans, this is the original! Grin)


Anime fans, look at the windbreaker in the middle, presented as a staple for the average household (not certain really if it was that common)




And this is an example of the patterns:


Sorry about the blurry pictures, will try to replace them when I have better light - just couldn't wait to share.
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N30Nb100d
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2011 11:14:35 AM »

wow this looks like an amazing book! I especially love the skiing outfit, but they're all so awesome! I could just sit there and look at the pictures too.
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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2011 11:31:06 AM »

that's an awesome book!  i agree with the post above, i could definately just sit and look at all the pictures. it'd be fun to try to make something from it though.
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kriminie
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2011 01:18:24 PM »

i love the golden rule patterns, i have one of their modern books and a midcentury book. I'd love love love to get one of their early century books but i havent the dough for it yet Cheesy... you should definately make some of those dresses. If you use the measuring tape right it will fit fine, even thought the proportions may look a bit off because of the difference in womens sizes from then. I would give so much to have this book.. hahah.. anyways, LUCKY YOU!!! and i defo love looking at the pics Cheesy
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Marlaesk
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2011 03:33:39 PM »

Oh My Goodness I love that book!!  what a treasure!  your a lucky girl
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Ruby Copperhead
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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2011 04:30:49 PM »

Wow, so this kind of patterns still exists? It looks quite clever with being able to enlarge a postcard sized pattern to many sizes... glad you all like the book - I'll post more pictures as soon as possible! When I found the book, first it was a bit creepy, because the same illustrator had done a number of children's books that I had read as a kid, and when I found the pattern book, I realized how old these books had been... so it felt like a kind of time-travel, finding something familiar in a way earlier period.
Funny how those legs (argh, look at those legs) can be so ridiculous and at the same time look so elegant! The clothes also remind me of Indiana Jones movies Grin
I wish I could sew well enough to try some of the patterns, but I guess I'll practise on easier things first... but I always felt tempted to make one of those. We'll see...
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aethelberga
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2011 04:32:15 PM »

Interesting thought that even as late as 1941, housewives might want to make their family's clothing. Stuff for kids maybe & knocking up a dress for themselves, but a man's suit & dress shirt would be quite complicated, I would think. Still, very interesting. I have a similar one (a reprint actually) full of Victorian dress patterns meant to be scaled up for the home seamstress.
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Ruby Copperhead
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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2011 09:44:38 AM »

Hm, did they really make everything? Interesting question... I can easily picture this book being kind of propaganda for what the ideal, frugal and industrious housewife should be like. On the other hand, women did learn to sew in those times. Not every woman could have been sewing on a tailor's level, but a man's suit and dress shirt? I don't sew on that level, but it doesn't seem impossible.
If I think of my grandmother who lived in an almost moneyless economy all her life (in her village there were communal baking ovens, communal washing mashines, communal freezers, everything in a walking distance), and with a strong emphasis on never buying what you can make yourself... on the other hand, sewing is time-consuming... I really don't know to which extent clothes were sewn at that time.
Victorian patterns - half the historic craft-along would drool over them, I'm sure Grin
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aethelberga
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011 12:16:45 PM »

Well I think back to my grandmother who raised kids during the 30's and 40s and believe me if she had to sew her own kids' clothes, I don't think she could have done it. Now admittedly she was a working single mom, but I believe her skills lay elsewhere. I can barely sew but I might have a bash at kids clothes (they're going to grow out of them in 6 months anyhow) or something for myself (throw a bit of lace on a wonky seam). A coat, or a suit, where the fabric would be expensive, and he item would be worn for years would just make me afraid to try.

BTW, I had no idea this vintage project board existed. I love it.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2011 05:30:15 PM by aethelberga » THIS ROCKS   Logged

kriminie
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2011 01:01:24 PM »

yeah, they do still exist.. and they arent half bad really... you get over 200 patterns for about 125$ plus the measuring tape and everything. THey do a supplement every three months.. search under lutterloh. Ebay has some of them Cheesy. I cant sew extremely well, but i do alright, and i would gladly sew you something out of that book for a chance to get my little paws on it Cheesy!! In order to use the patterns you need a special measuring tape, again you can buy these for a few dollars on ebay or i would gladly scan and email you a copy of mine. You just add it on to the end of a normal measuring tape (in centimeters) and then put a pin through the dot that corresponds with your measurements through the x in the middle of the pattern. THen you turn the measuring tape around till it goes through one of the dots on the edge of the pattern and mark a dot at the number that that dot is marked with. for example if you are doing a shirt you measure your bust (dont worry about ease) and say its 90 centimeters. you put your pin through the 90 dot on the end of your tape measure and then spin the tape measure around like the hands of a clock till it crosses a dot. That dot has the number 12 on it, so you go to the 12 centimeter mark and put a dot. when you have marked all the dots you go back and connect the dots, and then cut and sew as if it was a 'normal' pattern!! I <3<3<3 them, because now matter what, the pattern i make it FITS!! very little adjusting, and it will come out with the correct measurements for MY bust and hip!! and the pattern is not on tissue paper.. haha ... sorry, sounds like im advertising.. haha anyways, you are a lucky girl!! let me know if you want a copy of that extention so you can try some patterns!!
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« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2011 05:35:01 PM »

Great book, its so fun to look at what was everyday stuff back then. I have a huge stack of vintage patterns that i got from my grandparents store(and i didnt even make a dent in what is still over there lol). Just reading through the pattern makes me nervous, way to complicated and way to small but i love the old illustrations.
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Brackish Potato
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2011 08:37:11 AM »

I love these old fashions! It's a bit unnerving to see that much leg on a little boy, though! Grin
My best friend would wear all of the women's fashions in the book. She loves the 40's!
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Ruby Copperhead
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« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011 08:40:50 AM »

@Brackish Potatoe: I know what you mean about the legs. Grin

@aethelberga, the copy that I have looks like it's never been used, so maybe that book was more like an ideal, or maybe a guilty pleasure Grin
I'm really not good at sewing, but when I was ten years old and had a year of sewing courses, I could do fitted clothes from complicated patterns with a bit of help from the instructor. Another year or two, and I think more advanced stuff would have come along. But I will ask some older folks about this question. I know that none of my grandmothers ever sewed for pleasure, but out of necessity, but I don't know to what extend.
@kriminie: Hehe, no, I'm not giving the book up, sorry Grin But I could try hunting down a copy on ebay.

And here's more pictures (apparently my camera isn't made for this kind of thing, even in daylight):

Apparently, in those days, guys had really long legs too! And can someone explain that one-piece underwear to me? I checked the pattern for a trapdoor in the back, but no.


I love those hats!


And here's the illustrator's approach to "stronger ladies": a super thin waist, a chubby cheek, and a bullet hole in the temple *ew*


And after a book full of puffy sleeves, finally something without. The button details are amazing throughout the book.


More sportswear: Ski, Tennis, Ski, Biking


Mightily fashionable brides outfit at that time. I can just say I don't get it. That no-nonsense approach of the whole thing makes marriage look like a business arrangement with some Virgin Mary decor. I'm running into a cross-time cultural barrier here. Probably all you need to know about this dress is that they call the neckline "cleavage", and that bottom part looks like a well-hidden maternity dress to me. (I guess it makes sense because the wedding dress was supposed to be worn for years on festive occasions, and without the veil it's probably... no, not really...)


A last one: Dirndl dresses were still popular when I was a kid. Today, they're only worn for getting drunk on the Oktoberfest. They're as random at their ethnic approach then as they are now Grin
« Last Edit: February 14, 2011 08:52:29 AM by Ruby Copperhead » THIS ROCKS   Logged
aethelberga
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2011 09:28:01 AM »

I've got to ask my mom (who was a teenager in the 40's and who actually can sew), if she made any of her own clothes. I do know that when she was still at school they didn't have much money and sew she sewed up the pleats in her skirt (catholic school kilt) so it was tight for when she went out on the weekends, and then un stitched it again for Monday morning, otherwise she would get in trouble with the nuns.
Having said that I love pretty much all the patterns you have posted here, for the womens dresses anyway. I like the shirtwaist style. I also like the wedding dress. It looks like a more modern pattern that someone made and posted on Craftster sometime back where the back is brought around under the bust and fastened. This one here: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=361709.0 It would probably be very accomodating for a pregnant bride.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2011 09:48:43 AM by aethelberga » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2011 10:59:27 AM »

WHat a cool book!

Apparently, in those days, guys had really long legs too! And can someone explain that one-piece underwear to me? I checked the pattern for a trapdoor in the back, but no.

Real men don't poo.........
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« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2011 12:56:19 PM »

amazing stuff--I love seeing how fashion has evolved and changed...and how some things do come back in one form or another!

thanks for sharing this treasure--what fun!
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« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2011 01:12:13 PM »

Wow, what amazing patterns!

My mum used to sew lots of clothes for herself and us. I don't remember her making men's clothes though. Here it still often used to be cheaper to sew your own things, even up to the 1970s and 1980s. It usually seems to work out more expensive now though. Sad
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« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2011 01:54:44 PM »


i love all the coats/jackets in that picture.  i'll take one of each please!   Grin   Tongue
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aethelberga
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2011 09:51:55 AM »

I did speak to my mom, and she does not remember either her mother or her grandmother (who lived with them) making any clothes, though there was a sewing machine in the house. Her aunt, however, did make my mother's prom dress. My mom did say that in the mid sixties, having outgrown all her maternity clothes she did have a seamstress make a maternity dress for her (so even though she could sew, she still went to a seamstress rather than do it herself). So maybe this book was aspitational for the average housewife, but really useful for seamstresses.
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« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2011 10:25:08 AM »

I think you would need a lot of technical skill to use a book like this. I keep coming back to this thread, I'd love a book like this, though I think this particular era is the wrong shape for me! Cheesy The details are fab.
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gnctheone
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2011 10:10:30 AM »

hi all, i know this is an old post, but can somebody please plase scan the  lutterloh tape measure they have?  i've just discovered an old golden shnitt book online but i cant use it without the tape measure... i live in istanbul and finding one here is impossible... please im desperate to have one..
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Ms. polimeric clay
« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2011 11:16:59 AM »

nice
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