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Topic: Pewter Charm  (Read 1057 times)
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deviouscrafty
« on: January 08, 2011 05:46:12 AM »

I had a go at casting a pewter charm, and learned that a two-part mould is sort of essential  Roll Eyes



But do any of you craftsters know ways to coat pewter to give it a gold-colour? Or other easy-to-use finishes? I'm just making ordinary jewellery, so precious metals are out, and don't have any specialist equipment really...
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Niblett
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2011 12:08:07 PM »

wow that's lovely, what did you make the mould from? In terms of finishes I like using metal leaf and in small quantities it doesn't work out that expensive even for gold leaf. Copper leaf is pretty too.
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hand-painted resin jewellery http://www.folksy.com/shops/raddington
deviouscrafty
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2011 08:32:12 AM »

thanks Smiley The mould is a type of RTV silicone which resists heat.
I might have a go with metal leaf then, I was just worried about it being fiddly! I also just found out about liquid metal paints, so might give them both a go and find out what works better for me Smiley
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Niblett
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2011 09:43:27 AM »

Oh I see, never seen silicone moulding material in that colour! I make my mould out of silicone caulk (bathroom sealant) for the cheap factor, but might think about upgrading...

Leaf isn't actually too fiddly as long as you put plenty of talc on your fingers, and use a brush/tweezers where possible. I've tried a few liquid metal paints, they weren't nearly as metallic as I was hoping.
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hand-painted resin jewellery http://www.folksy.com/shops/raddington
hello color!
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2011 09:45:18 AM »

This doesn't answer your question since I'm not familiar with pewter, but you should be able to make a 1-part mold for your charm, since it's just a cabochon. (You'd just have to remove a bit of pewter from the back of the swan's neck after casting.) You just have to be very careful that the back of the original you're molding is completely filled and that it's level with the base. I find it helpful to actually make the mold a couple mm deeper than the final cast: after everything in the back is filled in with clay, I roll out some more clay, put the object on the clay, and cut around to remove excess material. Since it looks like you're working with putty type silicone, the clay for the back should be polymer since you'd need to cure it to make it hard (so it doesn't smush out from the sides when you apply the silicone). (You COULD also make a 1-part mold that goes all around the object, with a seam that goes most of the way around, but those are much more annoying.)
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deviouscrafty
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2011 08:30:48 AM »

Quote
you should be able to make a 1-part mold for your charm, since it's just a cabochon

Wow, ok I think I understand what you mean.
The problem with a one-part mould I was having is pouring the exact amount carefully enough (since I'm just heating it in a saucepan with a wide spout), BUT by making the mould deeper than it needs to be I leave room for error/a little over/underfill and it works as a one part. Is that the idea?
I cast the mould from a polymer clay charm I made, so all I have to do is make the clay version thicker than I want the pewter - awesome beans! But what do you mean by cutting excess from the swan's neck?
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hello color!
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2011 04:16:11 PM »

The problem with a one-part mould I was having is pouring the exact amount carefully enough (since I'm just heating it in a saucepan with a wide spout), BUT by making the mould deeper than it needs to be I leave room for error/a little over/underfill and it works as a one part. Is that the idea?

Yep Smiley

Quote
I cast the mould from a polymer clay charm I made, so all I have to do is make the clay version thicker than I want the pewter - awesome beans! But what do you mean by cutting excess from the swan's neck?

It might just be the picture, but it looks to me like the swan's neck is not level with the swan's body - so, if you make the body flat on a table, the neck won't touch the table. Sometimes, stuff is made that way when one part is supposed to look like it's in front of something else - for example, the lamb's front and back legs in this picture. Since pewter at room temperature & pressure is viscous, it wouldn't flow into the neck part of the mold if there was silicone in the back of the neck (kinda like a sleeve), so you'd have to make the neck extra thick by adding stuff to its back before making the mold, and then after casting, you'd have to remove some of that thickness from the back by filing it off. But since you made it from polymer clay, that's probably just the picture and it's actually level on the back, in which case, it's much easier, so nevermind. Good luck!
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2011 08:00:07 AM »

For anyone wanting sources for various brands of silicone putty for making molds, check out this page at my site:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/molds.htm ...click on 2-Part Silicone Putties
Silicone putties are popular with polymer clayers when a flexible mold is needed or to get ulta-fine detail (otherwise, raw polymer clay is usually used to make molds then baked--one-part or two-part molds). Fun!

Re the composition real-metal leaf, there are sources for buying and some tips on handling the fly-away stuff as well as dealing with the oxidation of some of the colors on this page, if anyone is interested:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/leaf.htm ...click on Leaf

Diane B.

P.S.  And there are ways to simulate various metals with polymer clay too, again if anyone is interested:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/Faux--many.htm ...click on Metals


« Last Edit: January 12, 2011 08:02:43 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
deviouscrafty
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2011 09:05:21 AM »

Thanks so much for your help hello color, I'm going to give it a go!
& Diane, the glassattic encyclopedia has come to my rescue on many clueless moments, so thanks too Smiley

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