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Topic: Superwash wool as warm as regular wool?  (Read 1033 times)
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PUFFYsanjo
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« on: December 26, 2010 10:38:52 PM »

I'm curious to know how warm superwash wool is compared to regular wool. I guess it would be less warm since the fiber has part of the scales removed. I'd like to use superwash wool as ribbing for a sewn jacket as it would have to be washing-compatible with the rest of the garment. It doesn't get very cold here in Georgia, USA, I'm told, but I easily get cold. In the fall some months ago, I saw people wearing t-shirts while I had on a jacket!
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soozeq
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2010 08:02:05 AM »

I've seen the question asked before and many people say it is indeed as warm as regular wool.
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sue
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010 12:30:14 AM »

Kind of off topic here but I do have a suggestion on keeping warm.  Try looking at the "tech fabric" clothing with the wicking properties.  The wicking keeps the sweat and water off your skin.  Wet = cold.  The workout clothes at Target and some of the sporting goods stores carry the wicking fabrics like CoolMax. 

About two weeks ago I got lazy and didn't do laundry so I wore one of my workout t-shirts instead of my regular cotton t-shirt under a sweater and headed off for holiday shopping.  I ROASTED when I normally would have been comfortable. 

Steer away from cottons as it will hold moisture against your skin.  A loose knit acrylic is a better choice as acrylic doesn't hold moisture and the breathing holes will prevent overheating.
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PUFFYsanjo
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2010 01:19:15 AM »

Thank you for that tip. I was actually looking to use all natural fabric like a cotton shell with superwash wool ribbing. I'm not sure if I'll use the wicking fabric since it most likely is a synthetic. The only synthetic that I might use is a fleece lining, but I'll looking for natural fiber as an alternative. I'll probably use an interlining as well, probably the 100% cotton Warm and Natural batting. I have time to think about it as I won't have a chance to make anything anytime soon.
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