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Topic: Bottles of Hope (VERY image heavy)  (Read 3293 times)
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rebecnik
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2010 12:58:16 PM »

those are so pretty. and such a nice thing to donate im sure they will love and appreciate them.

Thanks much! I sure hope so!
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maxxev
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« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2010 10:38:52 PM »

 i just love the colours of the 'rising sun' bottle! but i think the fleur-de-lis bottle is defiantly my favourite! the pewter like colours compliment the medieval design perfectly. im sure they raise a smile Smiley
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rebecnik
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2010 08:15:36 AM »

i just love the colours of the 'rising sun' bottle!



Why thank you! I actually think the color is a bit misrepresented. It's a very deep cranberry to a bright yellow. I actually didn't realize the blend would turn out that way, but I loved how it came out! It made me think of a sunrise, which is why that quote specifically is on there.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2010 09:26:53 AM »

Quote
I realized that I showed the worst view of the Skinner roll one; some of the slices on that part are mushed. I still like it, though!

Actually, that amount of distortion isn't bad at all (and one of the great reasons to use spiral canes, for example, whether they used Skinner blends or not, since no one will notice slight distortion in them like they probably would on say a face cane, or a geometric cane where the lines have to meet exactly, etc).

Quote
This was actually my first bottle. The white "rope" discolored in the oven ("hooray" Sculpey), so I "painted" over it with a mixture of white pastel chalk dust and TLS.

Creativity in motion! (and often necessary with those 3 Sculpeys unfortunately).

Quote
For the orange one: It was textured after I put it on the bottle.. . . I gave it lots of texture (with the clicky part of a ballpoint pen)

OMG... you put each impression on one at a time?? Ack... I thought you'd used a texture sheet.  But that does explain how the seam area might not have been as problematic for the impression pattern.

Quote
The fleur-de-lis itself is from a perfectly-sized soap stamp that I stumbled upon. Then I put a micro-thin layer of rub-n-buff on my index finger and tapped away. I LOVE the effect!

"Highlighting" like this is really-really fun, I totally agree (and it's reverse, "antiquing," too)--a lot of bang for the buck, and brings out a lot of visual dimensionality, can add a lot to various fauxs, etc. 
(You didn't do "complete" highlighting though because you tapped your colorant on the upper surfaces rather than simply rubbing lightly over them so the highlighting would be solid and unbroken...another look.)
If you like that kind of effect though, try some of the other materials often used for highlighting on polymer clay like mica powders (Pearl Ex, etc) or even real-metal powders (Mona Lisa, etc)...or even paints, inks, metallic leaf, etc!  Lots of different looks and fun stuff to play with.

Btw, do you know yet that you can make your own stamps (and molds) with polymer clay (and other materials) to use with polymer clay, as well as finding stamps to use?  If not, you're in for a treat!

Quote
As for the one with the fluorescent yellow, blue and red: it's actually mokume gane. I flattened the colors together, bent the slab gently over the end of a large paintbrush handle, and sliced off the little dome. . .

Cool look.  There are so many ways to do the general technique of mokume gane too that the possibilities are endless and it's always an adventure to see what you'll get this time!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2010 09:36:57 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
rebecnik
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2010 01:22:27 PM »

Quote
If you like that kind of effect though, try some of the other materials often used for highlighting on polymer clay like mica powders (Pearl Ex, etc) or even real-metal powders (Mona Lisa, etc)...or even paints, inks, metallic leaf, etc!  Lots of different looks and fun stuff to play with.

I actually do have some silver mica in a little jar that I have yet to do much with. I have only used it twice so far, which was to give a metallic look to: 1) a pie tin for a tiny mulberry pie and 2) the lid of a tiny cookie jar. Today, I'm making a picture frame, and for that I think I might experiment with the mica again.

Quote
Btw, do you know yet that you can make your own stamps (and molds) with polymer clay (and other materials) to use with polymer clay, as well as finding stamps to use?  If not, you're in for a treat!

I did, actually; I have yet to do a lot of experimenting with it, though. The wine glasses on the green bottle were actually done with a pc mold I made myself. I made many attempts to carve tiny wine glasses, and finally I just got frustrated and made the mold. The fleur-de-lis stamp was one in a package of 6, so I will probably use those soon, as well. I really like them!

Quote
There are so many ways to do the general technique of mokume gane too...

I am quickly finding out that that is true! The bottle that just says "hope" can be considered a form of mokume gane as well (I think). I randomly layered torn sheets of different colors, covered it in white, and carved away the lines and letters with a Dremel. Probably the most creative thing I've come up with when it comes to clay!
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Diane B.
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« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2010 08:31:57 AM »

Quote
I actually do have some silver mica in a little jar that I have yet to do much with. I have only used it twice so far, which was to give a metallic look to: 1) a pie tin for a tiny mulberry pie and 2) the lid of a tiny cookie jar. Today, I'm making a picture frame...

Definitely try the mica powder as highlighting particularly if you have a textured or dimensional surface on your frame.  Should look spectacular!

Quote
The wine glasses on the green bottle were actually done with a pc mold I made myself. I made many attempts to carve tiny wine glasses, and finally I just got frustrated and made the mold.


I definitely see why you went to a mold instead of carving something that shape!  I guess you could have bent your own metal-strip cutter but that's pretty small, or you could have made and baked a thin sheet of clay then cut out two wine glass shapes with scissors while still warm (no Sculpey though), etc. 

Quote
The fleur-de-lis stamp was one in a package of 6, so I will probably use those soon, as well. I really like them!

If you haven't already, you should make a mold from that stamp too to use for making dimensional onlays rather than impressions. (I do double-duty like that for lots of the stamps and/or molds I have, and most will work unless they're really shallow.)

Quote
The bottle that just says "hope" can be considered a form of mokume gane as well (I think). I randomly layered torn sheets of different colors, covered it in white, and carved away the lines and letters with a Dremel.

Yep, fun.  You could even use your fleur de lis stamp for making a mokume gane stack, then shave bits off to reveal the fleur de lis and frame pattern in the stack, which would be yet another way to use that favorite stamp.

For the hope lettering, you could also make your stack then lay a piece of smooth cording on top to spell out hope in cursive, then press down on the cord-letters and remove to have created your own hope stamp. 
Or you could make a word stamp from that cording (perhaps cutting at joins so no overlaps) glued to a small bit of flat wood/etc, then use that as your stamp.
Or you could use one of those two "stamps" on a sheet of clay and bake, then create a mold from that so you could have the word hope to use as a bas relief too. Grin

Diane B.

« Last Edit: December 20, 2010 08:46:43 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
rebecnik
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2010 11:08:11 AM »

Quote
If you haven't already, you should make a mold from that stamp too to use for making dimensional onlays rather than impressions.

What a cool idea! And I could do the Sutton Slice that way! I have always wanted to try that! I should try that with a less-detailed one first, though (I have one that is a pear that I think I will try)

Quote
You could even use your fleur de lis stamp for making a mokume gane stack, then shave bits off to reveal the fleur de lis and frame pattern in the stack, which would be yet another way to use that favorite stamp.

Definitely! Oh, that would turn out awesome!

Quote
For the hope lettering, you could also make your stack then lay a piece of smooth cording on top to spell out hope in cursive, then press down on the cord-letters and remove to have created your own hope stamp.
Or you could make a word stamp from that cording (perhaps cutting at joins so no overlaps) glued to a small bit of flat wood/etc, then use that as your stamp.
Or you could use one of those two "stamps" on a sheet of clay and bake, then create a mold from that so you could have the word hope to use as a bas relief too. Grin

What lovely ideas! I will have to try some of these. The third one sounds most interesting to me.


As always, thanks for all your fantastic ideas! I have to redo the picture frame that I previously mentioned. It's wooden, and I tried to use Sculpey Bake n Bond as a base. I think I'm going to use wood glue (a tip from your site), so I have to run out and get some of that. On the first attempt, it all just cracked horribly. Sad Try, try again!
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lauricrowe
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2010 03:37:38 PM »

These are beautiful. However, why don't you use sculpey on the thin parts? I use to do some very thin slices with sculpey that I would then layer into other items like jewelry and they lasted years. I even created fake looking stained glass out of very thin sheets over a glass bottle before. Just curious. Maybe it's something with the current formulations? I was heavy into clay a good decade ago now and have only used premo recently, which I prefer by far.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2010 10:51:22 AM »

 
Quote
I think I'm going to use wood glue (a tip from your site), so I have to run out and get some of that. On the first attempt, it all just cracked horribly.  Try, try again!

rebednic, you don't have to use "wood glue" on the wood frame.  You can use any kind of "permanent white glue" (and wood glue is a type of that but yellow/etc) so even cheapie Elmers GlueAll would be fine or any other brand (Sobo, "tacky" white glues, Crafter's Pick The Ultimate, Weldbond, "PVA" glue, etc).  Let them tack up or dry on the wood before adding the clay.

They'll do two things in this situation:
...seal the wood if it hasn't previously been sealed (with acrylic paint, clear finish, etc)...otherwise the moisture still inevitably present in the porous wood will create swelling/bubbles/cracking/etc when heated (also be sure and preheat the oven)
...act as a physical buffer between the clay and the frame in case they swell a bit or shrink back a bit at different rates (the glue is flexible, and can also just insulate the wood even better from rapid heat changes)

HTH,
Diane B.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2010 10:52:11 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Diane B.
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« Reply #19 on: December 22, 2010 11:32:00 AM »

Quote
However, why don't you use sculpey on the thin parts? I use to do some very thin slices with sculpey that I would then layer into other items like jewelry and they lasted years. I even created fake looking stained glass out of very thin sheets over a glass bottle before. Just curious. Maybe it's something with the current formulations? I was heavy into clay a good decade ago now and have only used premo recently, which I prefer by far.

lauricrowe, it's nothing about the current formulations for the 3 main Sculpeys.**  It just has to do with those when they're left thin, or are projecting.  Sounds like you "backed" your thin bits by layering them onto other clay or other surfaces though and they should be fine that way as long as they can't be easily stressed alone (the glass bottle could be more of a problem though, depending on the actual thickness of the thin slices, the shape of the bottle, how it's handled, etc). It's when the final result is thin (without support) or projecting out in the air that those clays are the most vulnerable because they've always had a formulation that allows them to be "harder" on the surface than other brands of polymer clay but they sacrifice the flexibility/strength for that and become more brittle.
(That's also why I had suggested not using those Sculpeys when cutting out shapes from baked sheets of polymer clay with scissors while still warm; they're much more likely to break or shatter rather than being smoothly cut.)
**Sculpey III, SuperSculpey, and even more original Sculpey

All the clay brands and lines have had to undergo formula changes in the past few years (making them all less good) in order to be sold in the EU which had adopted very stringent plasticizer rules.  The "best" clays now for fine detail and for handling (and strength) are considered to be Kato Polyclay and FimoClassic.  Premo and Cernit are good too, but not as firm and more heat responsive.  FimoSoft is not as good as those, and the 3 Sculpeys pull up the rear.  There are even more brands and lines these days but those are the biggest and most easily available.

I checked out a bit of your blog and see that you also asked about non-polymer clays because of skin reactions.  You might want to check out this page at my site for info about using barrier creams (esp. Gloves in a Bottle) and also at least one particular brand of (non-latex) gloves that seem to work best for clayers:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/safety_health_cleaning.htm
(...click on the category called Rashes & Allergic Reactions)

If you want a non-polymer air-dry clay though just for "sculpting" purposes, some of the paper-based clays are pretty good.  
Those would include the pre-colored ones called Makins and Hearty if you can find them, the white one called Creative Paperclay in particular (can have acrylic paints/etc mixed into them to color, or of course be painted over):
http://www.google.com/images?q=%22Creative+Paperclay%22
(Some of the paper based pulps/pastes can even do some fun stuff ...won't be as smooth though can be sanded, etc...like these:
http://www.google.com/images?q=papier+mache+paste+pulp )

Some of the grain-based clays can actually do quite a lot... the one called "bread clay" will do pretty fine detail and is somewhat better than salt dough clay (though that's reasonably good for a lot of things too):
http://www.google.com/images?q=bread+clay
http://www.google.com/search?q=bread+clay
http://www.google.com/images?q=salt+dough
http://www.google.com/search?q=salt+dough
And the cornstarch based clays ("cold porcelains") handle a bit differently but can be an option (better to buy that stuff than try to make it)...often flexible:
http://www.google.com/images?q=cold+porcelain

All the air dry clays will shrink at least a bit though, and must also be sealed to prevent damage from later moisture and sometimes bugs too.

Btw, loved your embellished matchboxes!  Have you seen the ways those have been done with polymer clay (sometimes with transfers) too?  Found at least a few images of them in a Google search:
http://www.google.com/images?q=polymer+clay+matchbox
There are others on this page at my site too, including instructions for making several of the boxes into miniature "chests of drawers"--fun:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm
(...click on Cardboard, Papier Mache, Paper near bottom of list, then scroll down to Matchboxes)
Found this new link for at least Lisa Pavelka's basic instructions:
http://www.hgtv.com/decorating/mini-clay-matchbox-dresser/index.html

You also mentioned doing a lot of faces on one of the pages.  If you're interested, here's the page at my site that deals with clay faces in general too:
http://glassattic.com/polymer/heads_masks.htm
(more on some of the other sculpting and seasonal pages)

Let us see what you make(!)... even if you use air dry clays.  There really isn't a board for air-dry clays at Craftster, but sometimes people post them in the Polymer Clay board since a lot of people here do "sculpts" and air-dry clay pieces can be fairly similar when only doing that kind of technique.

Diane B.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2010 12:04:48 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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