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Topic: Two beginner questions  (Read 533 times)
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chirel
« on: October 07, 2010 10:47:12 AM »

Hi,

some years ago I had a chance to try spinning and as a result I have plied two-colored yarn that is quite uneven. I would like to use it for something as I really like it, but I have no idea how large project I could do with it (I was thinking of knitting something). I just weighed it and I have a little over 200 grams. I have hard time describing the thickness as I don't really know all the terminology in English. It looks like something I would knit with size four needles (I guess I'm using Europian measurements for needles). The main question is: does uneven handspun yarn behave differently from bought yarn?

Also another question. As an exercise I plied two shop bought yarns together (I thought it would be a good idea) and the result is a yarn that has a terribly tight twist in it. It kinks and after all these years the twist still hasn't settled and unravels if it's not tied. Could this kind of yarn be used for something? (Anything?)

(Oh, I wish I had time to practise spinning right now!)

Than you in advance.
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mullerslanefarm
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2010 10:55:45 AM »

a good way to determine needle size with hand spun is to double the yarn, then put it behind a needle guage. When the yarn fills the guage hole (with a little gap on each side), you've found your needle (or a size up or down from that).

I'm not a metric person ... 200 grams is about 7 oz.  this should be plenty to make a pair of mittens and a hat to match.

Does it knit differently? Yes and no.  I find that various brands of commercial yarn will knit different from each other and handspun is no different.  I knit and crochet with handspun all the time.

With your plied commercial yarns.  It sounds like you plied them in the same direction they were spun in.  For plying, you need to spin in the opposite direction.  If it were me, I'd wind it into a ball, then un-spin & ply it in a counter clockwise rotation (high twist, low take up)
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Cyndi

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chirel
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2010 08:36:29 AM »

Thank you for the answers.

I thought it might be about the direction with th olied yarn. I'll leave that project for later, but I might start a small project with the other yarn. I don't think it will be strong enough for mittens, but maybe a scarf or wrist and leg-warmers.
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