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Topic: Baking, Sanding, Antiquing, Buffing? Or...  (Read 853 times)
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Neurosylum
« on: October 04, 2010 06:30:36 AM »

So, I'm a little confused in the order in which to antique my pieces. Visited the Glass Attic website and all I know is that antiquing can be applied before or after baking. However, if you wanted your pieces to have a high-gloss shine, is the order: bake, sand, antique, then buff? Or is it bake, antique, sand, buff? I'm not sure since I've never antiqued clay before plus giving it a nice buffed shine.

(I'd also like to add that just like many clayers out there, I got so giddy about having produced shiny clay jewelry that I started to buff my older pieces. :3)
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Diane B.
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« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2010 11:43:19 AM »

Quote
Visited the Glass Attic website and all I know is that antiquing can be applied before or after baking.

Hmmm, where at my site did you see antiquing suggested before baking? Huh Baked clay that's been antiqued can be "re-baked" after antiquing if desired, and an antiqued effect could be created with multiple layers of clay (later sanding off top layer), or some backfilling is done before fully baking, but not sure which thing you were reading since the traditional method of antiquing is rubbing the colorant into the lower areas of the clay (or all over) which is kind of hard to do if the clay isn't hardened.
If you let me know just where you saw that, I can explain or perhaps just remember something that's slipping my mind about it.
(Oh, maybe you were reading about antiquing with powders?...that could happen by applying the powder all over the piece while it's raw, then baking, then sanding the powder off all the upper layers, and buffing, leaving the powder color in the crevices.)

Quote
. . .if you wanted your pieces to have a high-gloss shine, is the order: bake, sand, antique, then buff? Or is it bake, antique, sand, buff?

You can do it any way that works for what you're doing, or even what you suddenly decide to do later. 
Generally though, the dimensional clay piece would be baked, then antiqued, then sanded, then buffed --just to save time and since the lower areas won't be sanded/buffed and upper areas only need to be sanded once. (If you had used powders for the antiquing though, you'd be applying powder, baking, then sanding and buffing.)
If you wanted to "stain" the upper areas as well as antique the lower areas, I guess then all the sanding and probably most or all of the buffing could come last?
If you had a piece that was already sanded and buffed though and you wanted to antique it later, you could just do the antiquing then leave it as is or do a little tune-up buffing (or sanding and buffing) afterward.

To complicate things further, some clayers even alternate sanding and buffing with applying gloss Varathane!

Quote
got so giddy about having produced shiny clay jewelry that I started to buff my older pieces.

LOL... totally understandable!  The sanding-and-buffing technique gives a really amazing gloss to baked polymer clay that also feels really good.  And the satiny sheen that can be achieved with sanding plus less electric buffing (so not taken all the way up to glossy) is also fantastic in the looks and the touch department!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010 11:56:15 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Neurosylum
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2010 09:48:17 PM »

Hmmm, where at my site did you see antiquing suggested before baking? Huh

"before or after baking... molded clay items (or any textured item) can also colored ...or  partly colored
....can be "antiqued" by coloring the crevices, or highlighted by coloring the upper parts (doing this will bring out the detail, add dimensionality, complexity and punch, and in the case of antiquing create an aged look)"

http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/molds.htm

I found it there, but maybe I'm reading it wrong...?

If you wanted to "stain" the upper areas as well as antique the lower areas, I guess then all the sanding and probably most or all of the buffing could come last?
I did that...and all the antiquing paint came off on the raised areas. lol  Cheesy

To complicate things further, some clayers even alternate sanding and buffing with applying gloss Varathane!

Nah, I just wanna save some money while making money.  Grin


LOL... totally understandable!  The sanding-and-buffing technique gives a really amazing gloss to baked polymer clay that also feels really good.  And the satiny sheen that can be achieved with sanding plus less electric buffing (so not taken all the way up to glossy) is also fantastic in the looks and the touch department!
Yup! I am so addicted to it now! O__o My mom couldn't believe one of my pieces was clay since it was so shiny!  Shocked
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Diane B.
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« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2010 09:57:16 AM »

Quote
before or after baking... molded clay items (or any textured item) can also colored ...or  partly colored
....can be "antiqued" by coloring the crevices, or highlighted by coloring the upper parts (doing this will bring out the detail, add dimensionality, complexity and punch, and in the case of antiquing create an aged look)"

Sorry, that could be a little confusing!   The paragraph you saw is in the general summary about molds on the Molds page, but I try to use "indentions" to indicate the hierarchy of points and sub-points (that was the only option I could come up with when creating the site).

So what that paragraph should mean is that in general molds can be colored or partly colored. And that some ways those two things can be done would be antiquing or highlighting, or being completely covered with colorant--and that completely covered ones could also be antiqued or highlighted even afterward by sanding. 
(I put in the red numbers here to show what I wanted to be the first levels of hierarchy about coloring and partial coloring). I didn't though specify which techniques could be done to unbaked or baked clay in that summary...sorry.

before or after baking... molded clay items (or any textured item) can also colored...or partly colored
1....can be "antiqued" by coloring the crevices, or highlighted by coloring the upper parts (doing this will bring out the detail, add dimensionality, complexity and punch, and in the case of antiquing create an aged look)
.......antiquing is done with paints, inks, metallic or non-metallic powders or waxes... these may be thinned for more of a "stain"
........highlighting can be done with the same materials, and can add a metallic or elegant look if using metallics
2...molded items can be completely covered with these materials as well, or be antiqued or highlighted after complete coverage... if completely covered, sanding the top areas can create an antiqued effect as well)
3...(see below in Antiquing,etc. for more on all these)



Looks like I made a mistake in wording down in the main Antiquing, Highlighting, Staining section too... where it says:
...staining is usually done with more translucent (or thinned) materials or oils....see Staining just below for much more
Molds can be completely covered with these materials as well... or they can be highlighted after complete coverage by sanding top areas after baking.

It should say can be "antiqued."

Quote
If you wanted to "stain" the upper areas as well as antique the lower areas, I guess then all the sanding and probably most or all of the buffing could come last?

Quote
I did that...and all the antiquing paint came off on the raised areas. lol 

If you want to permanently stain the top areas, just leave the paint on longer before wiping it off (or possibly even bake it on)--the stain will be more permanent, and a bit deeper in the clay.  And also if you really need to buff or sand/buff, don't sand/buff too much. So you'd have to have the upper areas pre-sanded to the level you want, I guess, so you wouldn't have to sand much if you needed to later.
Sometimes artists' oil paints will stain a bit more and be glossier than acrylic paints too, though take longer to dry.  They can also be built up in layers.
Generally stains aren't sanded-buffed though, but to get a similar though more even effect you could also mix a bit of acrylic paint or even dirt/powders into a clear medium and apply that to the surface you want to stain...the clear medium could be things like Varathane or acrylic mediums, etc, and could be Satin, Glossy, or even Matte.  That combo could also be sanded and buffed since the clear medium will be thicker than just a wiped-off paint.

There really are so many possibilties with polymer clay and how it can be treated for different effects that there's never any one way, and a lot of the fun is experimenting!

Diane B.

« Last Edit: October 05, 2010 10:15:45 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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