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Topic: Have you tried buffing with a Shamwow?  (Read 1179 times)
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Neurosylum
« on: October 02, 2010 10:14:39 AM »

Has anyone tried buffing polymer clay with a Shamwow? I was gonna buy some muslin buffing cloth, but I saw my unused stack of shamwows (tried it on my dog, but it didn't work! Tongue) and thought I could cut it into circles and buff away.

I wiki-ed it and said it was chamois leather for buffing jewelry and stuff. I know I have to sandpaper my stuff real good for this to work.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamois_leather
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Blitherypoop
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2010 12:29:01 PM »

ShamWow isn't leather.  The official site FAQ says it's "made out of a rayon sort of material".  A little googling suggests that it "might" work for polishing, but I couldn't find anything convincing.
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Neurosylum
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2010 04:42:27 PM »

ShamWow isn't leather.  The official site FAQ says it's "made out of a rayon sort of material".  A little googling suggests that it "might" work for polishing, but I couldn't find anything convincing.
Drat. I assumed it was made of the same materials as regular shammys.
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FLTMedicMommy
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2010 08:01:36 PM »

Yes deff not the same material. But it might work? Maybe just try a little and see. Maybe worth a shot to save a bit of $
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« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2010 09:21:18 PM »

i usually use an old tea towel for buffing though kitchen paper or even toilet paper gets good results Smiley
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Neurosylum
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2010 10:57:27 PM »

Yes deff not the same material. But it might work? Maybe just try a little and see. Maybe worth a shot to save a bit of $

My dremel was confiscated by my dad >_< so, I did it by hand, so far, it's giving a nice matted shine, but I wish I could see if it could buff it to a candy shell-like shine. Maybe in a few days when I get my tool back! And yes, I wish I could get back my $19.99 + tax back, but since it absorbed more hair from my dog than water, I figured this was the only way I could make it worth the money spent. Tongue

i usually use an old tea towel for buffing though kitchen paper or even toilet paper gets good results Smiley

I used to use kitchen towels before reading about buffing with muslin cloth, too. Smiley I like the way it buffs up some of my faux jade pieces, but now I'm being drawn to high-gloss finishes.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2010 09:15:58 AM »

Not sure what Shamwows are made from but any soft cloth-like substance should work, either for buffing by hand (though can't get up to a high-gloss by hand) or made into a buffing wheel for a Dremel or other rotary tool.  Here's something from my Buffing page that could be similar:

I found some of that faux chamois stuff at Dollar Tree that people use to dry their cars ($1 per package) ... it looks like an orangey felt ....it gave a much better shine than the regular felt or a muslin buffing wheel
...I'm going to cut and cram as many small disks of this stuff on the flex shaft of the mini-bench grinder (on a Dremel mandrel --the one that has the little screw on the top to hold the wheel on)
...I'll also make larger disks for the mini-bench grinder itself, then I'll put those big washers back on either side of it (they came on the grinder to hold the fiber wheel on).... I will have to use something to cut a hole in the middle of each circle ... I'm hoping that I will get an even better shine. Chaun


Desiree McCrorey has made her small buffing wheels from denim (which fluffed nicely at the edges), and polyester felt as well as muslin, etc., and some have used "sheep's wool" pads and various other things attached to rotary sanders, etc. (and more variations of abrasives and electrical thingies for sanding), and have even used things like tumblers and home dryers for bufffing.  So it's worth trying almost anything that seems reasonable  Grin.  (Remember too that to get the highest gloss, buff in sequential grits up to at least 600 grit before buffing since less-smoothly sanded clay won't buff as well.)
http://glassattic.com/polymer/buffing.htm > Wheels (and other categories)

Diane B.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2010 09:16:17 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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Neurosylum
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2010 01:21:38 PM »

Desiree McCrorey has made her small buffing wheels from denim (which fluffed nicely at the edges), and polyester felt as well as muslin, etc.
I had read about her article before about using polyester felt! The texture the smaller Shamwow cloths had led me to wonder about its buffing ability since it was kind of felt-like.

Speaking of! I finished sanding (up to 1500 grit - I didn't want to take any chances) and cut out little buffing discs just like Desiree McCorey described in her tut. Sewed them together and...IT WORKED! It gave a really nice glossy shine! See pics. Each are kind of like a before and after comparison, so in the first one, one earring was machine-buffed and the other one left in it's hand-buffed matted shine.



I hope you can tell since my iPhone sucks at taking pics  Tongue I wasn't even expecting this much shine on the last pic! Trust me - it's so glass-like!
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