A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: You can get cheap (and legal! Wink) advertising by donating a challenge prize! Go here for more info.
Total Members: 299,151
Currently Running With Scissors:
668 Guests and 11 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Insert Hook tutorial - lots of pics!  (Read 18322 times)
Tags for this thread: tutorial , crochet_stitch_tutorial  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« on: September 12, 2010 10:01:08 AM »

It's been a while in the making, but I've finally put together instructions on the third thing you need to know to crochet.  The first two were yarn over and pull through.  The last is insert hook.

Insert hook can be done in so many places, that it's hard to know where to start.  The obvious place to start is "how to insert hook into base chain" which, indeed, is the first time you're going to need to do it (assuming you're starting with a project worked in rows.).

However, it seems like the most common mistake made by beginner crocheters involves insert hook.  It's such a common mistake, that I'm going to start with it.

No matter how advanced you are, or how long you've been crocheting, look at this:

Every crochet pattern is assuming that you will be inserting your hook into a stitch like this:


That is, under the two loops that make the v-shape, and above every other part of the stitch.

If the designer wants you to do anything other than this, the pattern will say so explicitly.


Contents:
working into a base chain
working into a stitch
front loop / back loop only  
front post / back post
Spike stitches aka long stitches
split stitches
working into a ring / space (no pics yet)
working in between stitches (no pics yet)
Conclusion
« Last Edit: September 12, 2010 10:25:35 AM by fantasticmio » THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2010 10:01:54 AM »

Ok, now that we have that out of the way, back to the base chain!

Here is what the front of a base chain looks like - see the V's?


And here is the back - check out the bumps along the middle:


Working into the base chain is rather annoying.  Even the most advanced crocheters think so (in fact, many have switched to using a foundation row whenever possible to avoid the unstretchy and highly annoying base chain).

If you're brand new to crocheting, try to keep this in mind - once you're done working into the base chain, things get easier, so hang in there!

1.  My prefered way of working into a base chain is through the bump on the back, like so:

The hook is inserted under the back bump and above the V on the other side.  This makes a very nice bottom edge for your project.


2. Another good method, especially if, in the end, you're not going to see the base chain, is to work under two loops, specifically: work with the front of the chain facing you, and insert the hook under the top loop of the V and the back bump, leaving the bottom loop of the V below your hook.

I recommend you try this method if the back-bump method pictured above is a bit tricky for you.  

3. The easiest method for working into a base chain is to work into just the top loop of the V:

While this is the easiest, it also produces what I feel are the worst results.  However, if you're eager to get on with learning the different stitches and are not too concerned with the over-all look of the piece, then go for it!  Figure out the "working into the base chain" part after you're more comfortable with the different stitches!


4. This last method of working into the base chain in this tutorial, is both the hardest, most annoying way, and, strangely, the way beginner books tend to suggest.  That is, working under the two loops of the V, and above the back bump:

I really don't recommend doing it this way.  I mean, sure, you're working under the V, and that's "good", but it can be really difficult to do, and when you're finished, that bottom edge just looks like the back bump, and that's not a very interesting result for all the work you put in to creating it.


That's it for the base chain; let's move on to working into a stitch.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2011 04:32:25 AM by fantasticmio » THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2010 10:02:58 AM »

Here is a row of dc stitches.  You'll see them like this if you're working in the round:


Here they are again, from the back.  You'll see them like this if you're working in rows:



This bears repeating:

1. Patterns assume you're working into stitches this way.
 Under the two loops that make the V at the top of the stitch, and above everything else:

This is absolutely critical.  Inserting your hook in a way other than this isn't a *bad* thing; in fact, the other ways of inserting the hook make for some rather beautiful, textural effects.  However, unless the pattern you're following specifically says to insert the hook in a different way, you should assume the designer wants you do to it this way.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2011 04:34:59 AM by fantasticmio » THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2010 10:03:27 AM »

2. A common variant is to insert the hook into the front loop only (flo) or back loop only (blo), refering to the loop in the V-shape closest to you, and the loop in the V-shape that is furthest from you.

Front loop:


Back loop:


This method creates a sort of angular effect that is often used in blankets or worked sideways to make a cuff, or other type of ribbing.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2010 10:03:56 AM »

3. Post stitches involve working around the post part of a stitch, and is most often seen when using dc or tr stitches.

Front post stitches are made by inserting the hook through the fabric, from front to back, to the right of the stitch, and bringing the hook back through the fabric to the front on the left side of the stitch:


Back post stitches are made in a similar way.  For these, you insert the hook from back to front to the right of the stitch, and from front to back on the left side:

(The hook is on an angle in this picture to show where the hook end is)

Post stitches are used to create a more pronounced texture for things like crochet cables, basketweave patterns, and in examples like this truly awesome Tetris blanket.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2010 10:04:25 AM »

For the next examples, I've made a row of sc stitches along the top of the dc stitches (using the assumed insert method above).

4. Spike stitches, also known as long stitches are made by inserting your hook in a row (or more!) below where your normally would.

These can create an interesting effect on the surface of your project.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2010 10:05:07 AM »

5. Split stitches, which I've only just recently come across, are worked through the middle of the post of the stitch.  In the case of sc, you insert the hook between the upside-down V in the post of the stitch:

It seems split stitches are often used to create a look similar to stockinette stitch in knitting.  I don't have any personal experience with it, though, so I couldn't say for certain.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2010 10:07:04 AM by fantasticmio » THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2010 10:07:53 AM »

There are other ways to go about inserting your hook into your project that I haven't covered here (yet). 

For example, I left out the technique of "working into a space" which is exactly as it sounds (insert hook into space created by a previous part of the pattern), and is used in lacy projects and when working in-the-round. 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2010 10:08:18 AM »

Another method I left out was working in between the stitches, which is very similar to working into a space.  You insert your hook, from front to back, between the posts of two stitches, and work the stitch there. 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3052
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2010 10:08:48 AM »

Another thing to keep in mind with this aspect of crochet is that you can insert the hook anywhere you want!  To make a solid fabric, you work your next stitch into the stitch next to the one you just worked into.  To make lace or another kind of fabric with holes in it, you normally skip stitches.  Some patterns have you skip stitches, only to come back to them later.

I think this is the part of crocheting that tends to confuse people, which is understandable, given the sheer number of options, but this is what makes crochet so flexible; what makes it possible to easily shape our projects, or add texture and interest.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Shiseido, Beer Floats, and DIY Jewelry
How to Create a Reverse Smoky Eye Look
Birchbox September 2014: Bath and Body Sneak Peek
Birchbox September 2014: Member Birchbox Unboxing
Birchbox September 2014: Sneak Peek Member Unboxing
Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Embellished Guest Towels
Handmade Gift Ideas: Hostess Gift
Handmade Gift Ideas: Mini Book Jewelry

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.