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Topic: Let's see your sewing machine!!  (Read 202739 times)
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xiphmont
« Reply #490 on: December 12, 2008 12:18:13 AM »

Changing a portable 99 with a knee control to a foot controller is only 2 wires, and one foot controller away- easy peasy.

Any old Singer portable or cabinet machine that uses the three-hole plug that plugs in at the back of the arm (that is, the kind where the plug is on the bracket holding the motor) will happily take a foot pedal/power cord combo with no wiring changes.  Both the foot pedal and knee controller would work to control the machine.   No reason to disconnect the knee controller, it's an 'open' when not being used.

Some machines weren't set up like that, but those are mostly the early electrics (early 66/99s from the 20s and the 101).  By the 40s, they were pretty much all 'plug on the motor bracket'.

Personally, I like the knee controller, my wife likes the pedal, so I leave my machines wired for knee controller and she plugs in the foot controller when she wants to use it. 

Monty
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« Reply #491 on: December 12, 2008 05:10:13 AM »

Some of the portable Singer 99's with the knee controller do not have the three prong terminal at the back of the machine.



Above is a photo of a 99 that I converted to handcrank.  It had the knee controller, and you can even still see the little hole in the base just under the hand wheel where the bent rod was inserted.  Every portable Singer 99 that I've ever ran across that had the knee controller had the exact same set up.


They often have a junction box that is located under the motor and is actually part of the motor mount.  The wires go from this junction box to a controller that is screwed into the case.  At the front of the case base, there is a hole, into which bent rod/knee lever is inserted that activates the controller. 

To change from this set-up to a foot control, one would need to open up the terminal box under the motor, disconnect the wires to the knee controller which is screwed into the base of the case and connect the two wires from a foot controller that could be place on the floor.

If it were a cabinet model with the bracket that holds the Singer button controller for use with the knee lever, then yes, no rewiring is necessary.  Just pop the button controller out of the bracket and use it on the floor. 
« Last Edit: December 12, 2008 01:06:42 PM by Sew-Classic » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Jenny
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xiphmont
« Reply #492 on: December 12, 2008 12:44:43 PM »

The portable Singer 99's with the knee controller do not have the three prong terminal at the back of the machine.

Some do, some don't:




I have four of these machines on my bench waiting for service right now. Most of the 99 potables that have passed through my hands have the three prong plug, but it's a slight majority.  Most of the ones that dont have a power cord that ends in two push-on round plugs and the motor/light are wired in.  I have also seen very late 50s 99Ks (the ones with the sheet metal or plastic motors) wired directly.

Naturally, Singer changed production details alot, and it was fairly common for machines, bases, and random parts to be swapped with some abandon.

But the point is 'if the three prong plug is there, and there's a good chance it will be, you can just plug a foot pedal in without changing anything'.

Monty
« Last Edit: December 12, 2008 12:53:24 PM by xiphmont » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #493 on: December 12, 2008 01:07:40 PM »

Either way, it's still not a complex switch. easy-peasy  Grin
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xiphmont
« Reply #494 on: December 12, 2008 07:56:48 PM »

Either way, it's still not a complex switch. easy-peasy  Grin

Yes indeedy! It was intended to be user-servicable, I have a few thin manuals on the subject I've not managed to scan yet.

Monty
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gimmemoresalad
« Reply #495 on: December 13, 2008 03:39:38 PM »

I finally have a picture of my machine so I can share  Grin

It's an old Singer clone, dunno what year.  I'm trying to figure it out, but it seems like mostly Singers are traceable and clones aren't.  Not really a surprise but disappointing nonetheless.  That's okay, though, cuz I <3 this thing!  It used to belong to my Mema (Dad's mom), but she gave it to my mom at some point... before I was born.

« Last Edit: December 13, 2008 03:42:39 PM by gimmemoresalad » THIS ROCKS   Logged
Obsessed Knitter
« Reply #496 on: December 13, 2008 11:54:22 PM »



This is my trusty workhorse. I am extremely lucky in that my mother has been a quilter for over twenty years. This used to be her machine. When she 'upgraded' to one of those really fancy computerized embroidery machines and I went off to college she let me have this machine. After 15+ years of her using it, it's still going strong. It's all mechanical, all metal parts, and I absolutely love it. I would never be able to afford this machine (they still sell this model, for nearly what she paid for it 15 years ago!) so I am very grateful that my mom felt she needed to upgrade.  Grin I still need to name it though. It's been nameless for a couple years now, and I think it needs a name. Something that isn't a cliche.
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angeltreats
« Reply #497 on: December 14, 2008 11:10:06 AM »

If my Bernina ever died on me, that is the machine I would replace it with!  I learned to sew on a 1001 and loved it so much.
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anrahn
« Reply #498 on: December 14, 2008 01:31:25 PM »

What a great machine!!! I'm a Costume Design major and this is the machine we use!
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« Reply #499 on: December 19, 2008 02:58:47 PM »

I just got done cleaning this one up and I took some photos.  I am so NOT NOT NOT a phtographer, and I have been pulling out my hair and been a slave to the weather conditions in Northern Ohio trying to get decent photos - until recently.  I think I figured out the trick (atl least with my camera)



Anyhow, I did write about my picture taking issues on my blog in an article titled "Non-Photographer Taking Photos of Sewing Machines- The Challenge Conquered?"



« Last Edit: December 19, 2008 03:13:35 PM by Sew-Classic » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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