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Topic: Question about lining and draping  (Read 621 times)
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Nandra
« on: May 01, 2010 10:24:27 PM »

I'm about to start on a my first draped dress... I'm probably going in way over my head, but oh well! Anyway, I've been doing a bit of research, and it seems like most draped dresses are done over sort of "foundation" linings - at least, according to this board (http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=317046.0).

I'm just a little confused over the actual logistics of lining a draped dress. It seems to me like I'd have to put the lining on the dressform, then drape the dress over it and tack it with pins as I go - but how would I finish the edges, then?

Or am I completely wrong about draping the dress over the lining? Do I drape the dress separately and then attach it to the lining normally (i.e., right sides together) afterward?

That might not have made any sense at all...  Undecided I'll try to clarify if you have any questions! Thanks for taking a look at this, I hope that you can shed some light on the problem; it's probably not half as confusing as I just made it out be.
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fashion_disciple
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2010 08:14:21 AM »

Hi, I am totally new to Craftster, so I hope I am not butting in!

But, the great thing about draping is that there aren't a ton of rules (and it is a lot easier than patternmaking)! You don't need to have a "foundation" or lining under the fabric that you are going to drape. If you are going to line the dress afterward, then you can always drape the lining seperately - and yes, then you sew with rights sides together as usual.

If you have ever watched project runway, you may have noticed that there are little lines all over the dressform - these are guidlines. Basically you put the lines to show things like the neckline for instance, so if you drape the lining seperately you know where it should end so that it matches up with your dress pieces.

I think the easiest way to drape is to just lay the fabric over the dressform, mark everything (with chalk so that it doesn't ruin the fabric, or if you can spare it drape with muslin fabric, and then you can lay it over the good fabric so that if you make a mistake, you haven't ruined your good fabric), take it off your dressform, cut off any extra fabric (outside of the markings and seam allowance), then sew it.

Another suggestion is to search "draping" on youtube and you should get a few videos of some basic draping techniques. I hope this helps you and hasn't confused you more! If you have any other questions, send me a message!
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Aislynn
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2010 10:27:04 AM »

My understanding of draping is like this.  There are two schools of thought (sometimes considered the "right" and "wrong"...IMHO, if it ends up in a wearable, pretty garment, it's always "right").  Anyway...the first is to start with a fitted lining or base garment, which may or may not be lined itself.  This garment follows the general silhouette that you want the completed garment to have.  You put this garment on your dress form, then take your fashion fabric and drape, tack, and mark.  The really pretty woven fabric styles seen on last year's red carpets have been emulated in this way by home seamstresses.  You can either hand-stitch all of your ends and points down, or remove the draped fabric, and use your markings to stitch and finish with a machine, then attach it permanently to your lining.  Dresses with pick-ups do this, too.  The pick-ups get tacked to a lining.  The other, slightly more analytical way to do it, is to drape directly onto your mannequin and pin in such a way as to end up with a structurally sound dress, which doesn't need to be tacked at any point to an undergarment to support any of its design details.  This is a method of pattern making, wherein the draped fabric gets translated into a flat pattern, which ultimately gets turned into a dress.  This is what you're seeing on Project Runway, when they're tacking muslin to the dress forms.  It requires real drafting experience.  The other one is more of a shoot in the dark method.  Both are effective.  The first is more effective, I would think, if you made your base garment, attached your draped fabric, and then lined the whole shebang.  It'd definitely help with your finishing.
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Nandra
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2010 04:05:10 PM »

That's weird... my post vanished! I was sure I'd replied!

Sorry for such a late reply, then - thank you so much for your help, both of you guys are awesome. The point about lining it afterwards is especially helpful, I think that solves everything!

Maybe when I'm all done, I'll upload some pictures.
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