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Topic: yoke shirt help  (Read 490 times)
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Eliea
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« on: May 01, 2010 08:29:00 PM »

I'm not sure if it's technically called a yoke shirt in this instance but what I am wanting to do is recon a t-shirt so that the whole top from just above the bust(shoulders included) is made with a woven. I want to either use the same material to do the sleeves or use the original t-shirt sleeves.

Any idea how to estimate for this? If it were a stretch I'd use another shirt as my template but I know that's a bad idea for a non stretch. How much extra seam allowance should I add is basically what I'm wanting to know.

Is there a tutorial online somewhere for this? any help appreciated!
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fashion_disciple
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2010 08:23:02 AM »

What you are describing is called a yoke. I am not sure of any online tutorials, but hopefully I can help you a little (I am new to craftster, so I will try my best).

You can add as much seam allowance as you want, generally it is 1cm (3/8"), 1/2", or sometimes even 5/8". I usually use 1/2". I think the easiest way to do it would be to use a seam ripper and take the sleeves off. Mark your yoke lines on the t-shirt (don't forget to add your seam allowance up from where you want the actual seam to be) and cut the top portion off. Then sew your yoke onto the t-shirt and reattach the sleeves.

Depending on how tight fitting your t-shirt it, you might be able to get away with using your t-shirt sleeves as a pattern for your woven sleeves. I wouldn't want to stray too far away from the pattern as you need to sew these back into the armholes.

I hope this helps! If you have anymore questions, send me a message!
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Aislynn
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2010 10:19:41 AM »

I think what you're asking about is more a question of ease, rather than seam allowance.  A stretch, by its nature, will fit and conform to your body, without inhibiting your movement, or your ability to get in and out of the garment.  That means knits need little, to no, to negative ease (negative ease is when the thing stretches to just get around you, like a tube top).  Wovens, on the other hand, won't do this, and need extra room beyond your body measurements to fit, and allow you to move.  The absolute best thing that you could do for this project would be to find a pattern for a woven shirt that you really like the top of, and use that as your guide.  Once you get it made and fitted, just attach the bottom of your tee wherever you want it to go.  Barring this, use a woven shirt, exactly like you were going to use a t-shirt as a pattern guide, trace around it and add whatever seam allowance you're comfortable with.  Then do the same thing.  Make up your woven part, then attach the tee to the bottom.  If I were you, I'd curve the woven top down underneath the arm so you're not trying to attach the sleeve to half woven/half stretch.
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Eliea
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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2010 03:06:26 PM »

I think what you're asking about is more a question of ease, rather than seam allowance.  A stretch, by its nature, will fit and conform to your body, without inhibiting your movement, or your ability to get in and out of the garment.  That means knits need little, to no, to negative ease (negative ease is when the thing stretches to just get around you, like a tube top).  Wovens, on the other hand, won't do this, and need extra room beyond your body measurements to fit, and allow you to move.  The absolute best thing that you could do for this project would be to find a pattern for a woven shirt that you really like the top of, and use that as your guide.  Once you get it made and fitted, just attach the bottom of your tee wherever you want it to go.  Barring this, use a woven shirt, exactly like you were going to use a t-shirt as a pattern guide, trace around it and add whatever seam allowance you're comfortable with.  Then do the same thing.  Make up your woven part, then attach the tee to the bottom.  If I were you, I'd curve the woven top down underneath the arm so you're not trying to attach the sleeve to half woven/half stretch.

That's exactly what I was wondering. Yes. I will have to see if I can find a shirt in my wardrobe that fits what I'm looking for. I know my yoke shirt patterns are older. (vintage) and not really the kind of yoke I'm looking for.

Thank you both for the tips. I agree with using the t-shirt sleeves for a pattern. That's the smart thing to do in this instance I think.
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Aislynn
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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2010 03:31:09 PM »

That's actually the beautiful thing...you don't need to use a yoke shirt pattern to make a yoke shirt.  You can use any shirt pattern, and just cut the pieces off as if they were a yoke.  Just create a seam wherever you want it to go above the bust, and mimic that line at the top of your knit material.  If it's a curve, be sure to clip it, so the knit will lay flat.
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Eliea
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« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2010 07:52:06 PM »

That's actually the beautiful thing...you don't need to use a yoke shirt pattern to make a yoke shirt.  You can use any shirt pattern, and just cut the pieces off as if they were a yoke.  Just create a seam wherever you want it to go above the bust, and mimic that line at the top of your knit material.  If it's a curve, be sure to clip it, so the knit will lay flat.

thanks so much! I'll have to check my patterns and see what I have. I know I can get a pattern fairly inexpensive if I don't have one that will work. Smiley
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