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Topic: Translating Industrial Yarn Weights?  (Read 2115 times)
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knitknitter
« on: April 22, 2010 09:04:40 AM »

Hi, I am trying to figure out how to translate industrial yarn weights to have an approximation of whether an industrial yarn is a lace/heavy weight/bulky/dk, etc. For instance, what does NM 2.5 mean? And N.M. 2/7000?
Thanks to anyone who has advice about this.

I was able to find some explanations here after searching on the web, but the translation still is not clear to me.
http://www.softtextile.biz/yarntechnicalterms
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soozeq
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2010 01:33:24 PM »

The smaller number - 2, 3, whatever - is the number of plys in the yarn. The larger is the meters or yards per pound. The M would be meters in this case. Maybe this article will help a little - http://yarnforward.com/yarncount.html
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sue
knitknitter
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2010 03:51:57 PM »

The smaller number - 2, 3, whatever - is the number of plys in the yarn. The larger is the meters or yards per pound. The M would be meters in this case. Maybe this article will help a little - http://yarnforward.com/yarncount.html
Thanks, soozeq. I saw this after posting. So does this mean that the 2.5 nm is a dk weight or an Aran weight? I am trying to figure out which one it is.
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soozeq
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2010 05:02:03 PM »

I'm afraid I don't know, I'd have to do the math to figure it out, and don't have the time tonight, sorry.
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sue
dancingbarefoot
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2010 12:15:02 PM »

Hi, I am trying to figure out how to translate industrial yarn weights to have an approximation of whether an industrial yarn is a lace/heavy weight/bulky/dk, etc. For instance, what does NM 2.5 mean? And N.M. 2/7000?
Thanks to anyone who has advice about this.

I was able to find some explanations here after searching on the web, but the translation still is not clear to me.
http://www.softtextile.biz/yarntechnicalterms

Does this help?
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knitknitter
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2010 06:58:12 AM »

Hi, I am trying to figure out how to translate industrial yarn weights to have an approximation of whether an industrial yarn is a lace/heavy weight/bulky/dk, etc. For instance, what does NM 2.5 mean? And N.M. 2/7000?
Thanks to anyone who has advice about this.

I was able to find some explanations here after searching on the web, but the translation still is not clear to me.
http://www.softtextile.biz/yarntechnicalterms

Does this help?

Thanks very much, yes it does.
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