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Topic: How do I transfer a drawing onto wood?  (Read 9415 times)
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NynaeveAS
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« on: March 07, 2004 04:44:09 PM »

Ok, I drew a really neat picture that I want to transfer onto a painted wood surface.  The only way I can think of moving it is with carbon paper.  (For those of you under the carbon paper age, it's a paper that you attach to the back of the item you want to tranfer and then stick it onto the target, in this case the wood.  Then with a nice sharp pencil you retrace your drawing and there will be a blue line tracing on the wood left when you are done.)  I'm not sure if there is another option out there for transfering it.  Any ideas?  I do have a scanner and printer if that helps.  I don't want the image decopaged on because I perfer to paint it  once my image is tranfered.  Please help! Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2004 05:47:45 PM »

How important is it to get a 'xeroxed' copy onto the table? You could use photo transfer paper to transfer the image to clear polymer clay if accuracy is an issue, but it's expensive that way.
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2004 06:09:49 PM »

If that is the only other option, I think I'll go with carbon paper. Smiley  That method is practically free.  I was hoping someone might know of some computer printer paper that will work for as a transfer paper if nothing else...
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anwa
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2004 08:34:03 AM »

Get a heat transfer tool.. it's super easy. Make a copy of the photo on a copy machine or you can scan it and print it on a laser printer (not inkjet, won't work). Make sure the photo is the MIRROR IMAGE or you'll mess up. Don't worry transfering images to wood because you can always sand it off!

You lay the image down on the wood and rub the transfer tool (it's a woodburning pen with a flat top attachment) over the surface. It'll instantly transfer the image onto the surface and voila! You're ready to paint (or in my case, burn!)

Walnut Hollow makes a transfer tool. Just go into the wood crafts section of virtually any craft store. Approx. $15
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2004 11:47:15 AM »

Another way to do it is similar to the heat transfer tool ... but you use a blender pen with Xylene.  Basically you photocopy the image, put it on the surface you want to transfer to face down (taped so it doesn't move), use the blender pen on the backside of the photocopy, and rub with burnisher/spoon to transfer.  Again, you'll need to reverse the image on the computer first because it will flip directions in this process.  You can get blender pens at some art supply stores ... but the ones with Xylene (which you need for this) are toxic ... make sure to do this in a well ventilated area.

A link on the process with some pictures:

http://www.art-e-zine.co.uk/imageblend.html
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2004 03:24:51 PM »

Both ideas sound like what I am looking for.  I'll have to check them both out at the stores.  Luckily for me the craft store is right next to the woodcrafting store.  Isn't that nice of them? Smiley  Thank you so much for the help!
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Jason
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2004 05:34:39 PM »

the super cheap (free) method is to flip the page over and trace over the entire drawing using thick pencil strokes. (be careful when you do this, as the original drawing will transfer to whatever is underneath it) next, turn the drawing back over and pin or tape into position.  then trace over the drawing again with a sharp pencil point or ball point pen. press hard but be careful not to poke through!  this is essentially poor man's carbon paper, but without the risk of 'slippage' that can occur with the two-sheet carbon paper method.  
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anwa
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2004 06:00:54 PM »

the super cheap (free) method is to flip the page over and trace over the entire drawing using thick pencil strokes. (be careful when you do this, as the original drawing will transfer to whatever is underneath it) next, turn the drawing back over and pin or tape into position.  then trace over the drawing again with a sharp pencil point or ball point pen. press hard but be careful not to poke through!  this is essentially poor man's carbon paper, but without the risk of 'slippage' that can occur with the two-sheet carbon paper method.  

I've done this before with certain images but it doesn't work well on wood. Unless you really rub the heck out of the original drawing, you won't get a very dark line. It's tough if the image has a lot of detail as well. The more you trace over a line, the thicker it becomes
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« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2004 06:15:29 PM »

Ok, I drew a really neat picture that I want to transfer onto a painted wood surface.  The only way I can think of moving it is with carbon paper.  (For those of you under the carbon paper age, it's a paper that you attach to the back of the item you want to tranfer and then stick it onto the target, in this case the wood.  Then with a nice sharp pencil you retrace your drawing and there will be a blue line tracing on the wood left when you are done.)  I'm not sure if there is another option out there for transfering it.  Any ideas?  I do have a scanner and printer if that helps.  I don't want the image decopaged on because I perfer to paint it  once my image is tranfered.  Please help! Smiley

A tracer or projector would do the trick:
http://www.craftster.org/yabbse/index.php?board=42;action=display;threadid=570

Maybe you could borrow one rather than buying one -- they're kinda pricey...
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NynaeveAS
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« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2004 07:30:54 PM »

Tip on carbon paper for anyone who uses it: Use a spray adhesive on the back of the paper that the image is on and then adhere it to the back of the carbon paper.  Then it would slip at that point.  A good tape down will keep the other part from slipping.

The projector was the first thing I considered.  I don't think it will work because the wood surface has a curve to it.  The projector will cause the image to distort.  I've seen it happen once on a painted pottery piece.  Poor woman couldn't figure out why the image looked weird.  The only way around it is  to not work on the curve but on the flate section and readjust for each part of the curve.  Way too much of a pain for this one.  Would work well on flat stuff though.
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