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Topic: Scratch Resistant Sealant?  (Read 3008 times)
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mei
« on: April 05, 2010 01:52:42 PM »

Everyone's using resin because apparently it dries super rock hard. I prefer to stay away from resin because it takes way too long to cure. Unless there is a quick-drying resin that I don't know about?

I heard (more like read) Diane B. say that clear polyurethane would work well to make an item more scratch proof. What brand and type would you recommend?

I've tried 3D Crystal Lacquer and embossing powder and know that these two scratch easily. I've read that Diamond Glaze can give people nightmares with their bubbles, so I steer clear away from that too.

Help?
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Diane B.
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010 02:37:21 PM »

Quote
I heard (more like read) Diane B. say that clear polyurethane would work well to make an item more scratch proof. What brand and type would you recommend?

Well, polymer clayers like the brand Varathane (now by Rustoleum), and the indoor gloss version has something special called IPN (interpenetrating network) too, as well as being UV-resistant to avoid later yellowing from UV light or heat.  (The same product is probably being re-bottled these days under the Studio by Sculpey gloss finish name, but would be more expensive of course.)
Clear acrylic fingernail polishes are tough too.
Or for a thinner finish that isn't UV-resistant, floor polishes like Future or Mop'N Glo are also tough.

Quote
I've tried 3D Crystal Lacquer and embossing powder and know that these two scratch easily. I've read that Diamond Glaze can give people nightmares with their bubbles, so I steer clear away from that too.

Any polyurethanes (from the hardware store, and sometimes rebottled at art/craft stores) or those things just mentioned though will be better than any of the "white glue" based finishes (including the dimensional ones like Diamond Glaze or 3D Crystal Lacquer, etc) or than clear embossing powders, gloss acrylic mediums, etc.

Polyurethanes are also often used as a final coat to create stronger finishes over epoxy resin items (like Envirotex Lite, Easy Cast, etc), decoupaged items, Diamond Glazed areas, etc., as well as just being used alone.


Diane B.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2010 08:59:31 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Bionic Dingo
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010 10:58:09 PM »

Envirotex Lite makes a decent epoxy resin/glaze/whatever. I've actually seen it self-heal a few minor scratches on things I've made.
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mei
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2010 10:27:17 PM »

Quote
I heard (more like read) Diane B. say that clear polyurethane would work well to make an item more scratch proof. What brand and type would you recommend?

Well, polymer clayers like the brand Varathane (now by Rustoleum), and the indoor gloss version has something special called IPN (interpenetrating network) too, as well as being UV-resistant to avoid later yellowing from UV light or heat.  (The same product is probably being re-bottled these days under the Studio by Sculpey gloss finish name, but would be more expensive of course.)
Clear acrylic fingernail polishes are tough too.
Or for a thinner finish that isn't UV-resistant, floor polishes like Future or Mop'N Glo are also tough.

Quote
I've tried 3D Crystal Lacquer and embossing powder and know that these two scratch easily. I've read that Diamond Glaze can give people nightmares with their bubbles, so I steer clear away from that too.

Any polyurethanes (from the hardware store, and sometimes rebottled at art/craft stores) or those things just mentioned though will be better than any of the "white glue" based finishes (including the dimensional ones like Diamond Glaze or 3D Crystal Lacquer, etc) or than clear embossing powders, gloss acrylic mediums, etc.

Polyurethanes are also often used as a final coat to create stronger finishes over epoxy resin items (like Envirotex Lite, Easy Cast, etc), decoupaged items, Diamond Glazed areas, etc., as well as just being used alone.


Diane B.


Thanks Diane!
I tried using the varathane polyurethane you recommended. I've let it sit for a little over 2 days now with 2 coats of the polyurethane. When I run my fingernails lightly across the surface, however, it scratches it terribly Sad Am I not doing something right?
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Diane B.
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2010 12:21:18 PM »

Quote
I tried using the varathane polyurethane you recommended. I've let it sit for a little over 2 days now with 2 coats of the polyurethane. When I run my fingernails lightly across the surface, however, it scratches it terribly  Am I not doing something right?

That doesn't sound right at all!  Did you perhaps not get the indoor version (water-based?)...and btw, what material is it that you're coating?
Or perhaps your environment is very humid or cold? (in which case many finishes could take longer to dry completely).  Or did you maybe not wait for the first coat to dry thoroughly before adding the second coat?  

You can put it back into the oven at around 225-250 for about 5-10 minutes if you want though, which will further "harden" any similar finish (including the floor polishes).  This is called "rebaking" the finish when the item is polymer clay, and you can read more about it if you want on my Baking page or Finishes page.  If your item is made from something that can't go into the oven at that temp, then just wait a few more days (hopefully in a warm, dry, area), or perhaps just apply some heat to the surface with a hair dryer or something.

Report back!
Diane B.

« Last Edit: April 11, 2010 12:24:17 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
mei
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2010 12:55:43 PM »

I got the interior water-based type. On the instructions on the can, it says it'll work best above 50 degrees fahrenheit and below 90 degrees f. My room temperature is 70 degrees fahrenheit and I would say that there's a good balance of coldness and humidity - kind of in the middle. But technically I can't say for sure.

It says to recoat only after 2 hours when the first layer has dried and feels hard, which is how I did mine.
It also says that you can subject the item to light use after 24 hours, but for normal use, you'll have to wait 3 days. It's almost been three days for me and it seems to take to scratches a little better now. When I apply some pressure with my fingernail and drag it across lightly, it seems more resistant than it did 1-2 days ago!

I guess that since it doesn't say that it's flammable, I'll take your advice and try to heat it in my toaster over for a bit. I hope it works Smiley

I'm using this on shrinky dinks, the inkjet type.
I'll work on it and let you know what I find out!
« Last Edit: April 11, 2010 01:34:26 PM by mei » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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mei
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2010 03:33:03 PM »

I put my item in my toaster oven for 5 minutes at 200 degrees f as stated here: http://www.polyclay.com/varathane.htm

When it came out, I let it cool and tested a scratch with my fingernail on the surface. It still created marks Sad Don't think that worked! Also, as of today, it should be day 5 or 6 of being dried. No difference, still scratches.

After I baked it for a bit, the existing scratches that were on the surface was supposed to make them disappear (polyclay.com mentioned minute brush marks disappearing, so maybe scratches are too deep?) but they were still there.

Failed experiment it looks like!
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sandracb
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2010 06:57:12 PM »

Diane: you seem very knowledgeable in this topic!  You mentioned baking wax covered polymer clay, can you also bake resin? I have a bunch of items that i've waxed but wanted to seal it in so to speak. Can you bake that too?
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mei
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2010 07:06:57 PM »

I've read that you should never bake resin because doing so will release very toxic fumes. I've read one person say she actually bakes it all the time though, but you have to do it at a low enough temperature so as not to burn the resin.
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sandracb
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2010 08:11:46 PM »

I've read that you should never bake resin because doing so will release very toxic fumes. I've read one person say she actually bakes it all the time though, but you have to do it at a low enough temperature so as not to burn the resin.

Yeah, that's what I thought too, i've been too afraid to bake it! 
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Diane B.
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2010 10:42:43 AM »

Quote
  It still created marks  Don't think that worked! Also, as of today, it should be day 5 or 6 of being dried. No difference, still scratches.

Well, 200 F for 5 minutes is a shorter time and lower temp than usually used but it's possible that Sarajane's page on it was written long ago and never updated?  You could at least try 225-250 for 10-15 min if you are using an oven thermometer.

Otherwise, I don't know what's going on.  I suppose it's possible that the shrink plastic, or something you used on top of it, was not water-based so is reacting with the plastics or not itself drying.  I know mostly about using it on polymer clay or on some of the mica or real-metal powders and other things we sometimes use on polymer clay.

Quote
You mentioned baking wax covered polymer clay, can you also bake resin? I have a bunch of items that i've waxed but wanted to seal it in so to speak. Can you bake that too?

sandracb, I'm not sure which thing you're referring to by "wax."  I don't remember saying that actual waxes could be heated on baked clay, though those aren't used that frequently on polymer clay.  When they are, I suppose that the heating would just melt them a bit and make them smoother, but waxes will never be glossy clear finishes.  Let me know where you saw that so I can be reminded, and see just what I was talking about.

As for "baking" resin, that usually isn't advisable because too much heat will yellow most clear resins (UV light will do the same).  (They can be coated with a UV resistant polyurethane though.) 
The "wax" you used on the resin was part of buffing it, or what?

Diane B.
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POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
guerra_marta
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2010 11:08:46 AM »

I saw this thread and maybe I can find an answer about the ideal resin to apply on rubber surface. It's been 1 year I am researching on this!!!

I want to paint on a piece of rubber and I already found a primer to sand the material. What I need to know is I paint on the rubber and after (protection). It needs to be FLEXIBLE SO IT WONT CRACK!!!

I would also like to find a resin that is flexible BUT ALSO supports a 400F temperature for 20 seconds (So I Can use in Sublimation process (using transfer paper and a Heat press).

Can you name the products that I can start my tests?

Any recommendation would help.

TKSSS!!!

Marta
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