A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Did you know you can view all images posted by a member? Learn how here!
Total Members: 298,750
Currently Running With Scissors:
639 Guests and 29 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Homemade Black Walnut Syrup (same method for making maple syrup)  (Read 15276 times)
Tags for this thread: black_walnut , syrup  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
nikschaf
« on: March 28, 2010 09:41:42 AM »

Ooh, my first post in the cooking forum!

I had to show off my batch of homemade black walnut syrup.

I had wanted to make maple syrup, but don't have a maple tree in my yard.  But I learned the little-known fact that you can tap and make syrup from black walnut trees!  (I think you can also tap birch trees.)    So I tapped my black walnut tree and here are my results.

First, here's a pic of the finished product.  The garden gnome seems to approve of the golden syrupy goodness:


I had a nicer collection vessel for the sap (an official maple sap collection plastic bag) but the bag sprung a leak, so I have gone with a free low-tech replacement, a gallon milk jug.  My syruping book, called "Back Yard Sugarin'" by Rink Mann, calls the milk jugs "Idlenot Dairy Low Fat Sap Buckets" which cracks me up. 

I won't reinvent the wheel with a huge tute, because there are lots of good instructions for tapping trees for making syrup.  Here's a good link:  http://ohioline.osu.edu/for-fact/0036.html  And here is a link to the book I have:  http://www.amazon.com/Backyard-Sugarin-Complete-How-Guide/dp/0881502162/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269793990&sr=8-1

Basically, you tap a tree, collect the sap, then boil the sap down to the desired sugar content.  Syrup needs boil at a temperature that's 7 degrees fahrenheit higher than the temp at which water boils.  This temp can vary from day to day due to barometric pressure, so you'll want to boil a small pot of water, measure that temp, and then make sure your syrup boils 7 degrees higher than that.  If you can't boil your sap the same day, keep it cool, because it can spoil just like milk.  I kept mine in the fridge for about 5 days, until I had enough to make it worth boiling.

Here are a few pics from the tree, showing the spout in the tree, and my fancy sap bucket.  About 2 gallons of sap boiled down to a pint of syrup.  I feel quite proud of myself knowing I have my own stash of homemade syrup to enjoy this year, and it was fun including my 3 year-old son in the process.





THIS ROCKS   Logged
alwaysinmyroom
Craftalongs Moderator
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Life is Moving Along Splendidly
Online Online

Posts: 29863
Joined: 12-Feb-2006

Make all things!!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2010 09:53:38 AM »

Thank you for posting this...I have at least half a dozen black walnut trees on my property and had no idea you could collect the sap...I am in the frugalalong and have been trying to find ways to be independent and find ways to cut food costs!

I will definitely look at the links and the book...now I will have two uses for my trees!!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

sum1smuma
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2010 09:55:14 AM »

You Craftsters never cease to amaze me! Bet it is super yummy.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Ya just can't stop a crafty girl!
noturavggeek
"This is my art, and it is dangerous! Do you think I want to die like this?" Delia Deetz
Offline Offline

Posts: 489
Joined: 14-Nov-2008

I want to live 'til I die. No More, No Less


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2010 10:02:42 AM »

I've never had black walnut syrup, but my parents make their own maple syrup, and the stuff is awesome! I can't even stand the idea of store bought syrup anymore, it has me truly spoiled!


BTW...a weird and awesome thing to try, is when you're boiling down the sap, throw in some hot dogs or try making some hard boiled eggs. It doesn't affect the sap and you get a sugary treat!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Wulf
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 2635
Joined: 07-Oct-2009

Smalltacular is bestter.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2010 10:42:17 AM »

I like everything about this including the milk jug. It's almost the perfect collecting vessel: lightweight, clean, easy to carry, enclosed, spill-resistant and cheap! I didn't know about walnut syrup either, and it makes me wonder if there are any broadleaf deciduous trees that you can't get at least some syrup from. And two gallons of sap from one middle-sized tree seems a pretty good amount.

Wulf
THIS ROCKS   Logged

nikschaf
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2010 11:04:25 AM »

Thanks for the nice comments!

alwaysinmyroom:  Do you harvest the nuts too?   I've done that, and though they're hard to crack, they're super tasty!  I'm in Minneapolis, and the sap run seems to be petering out here.  I've only had a tiny bit of sap the last few days -- same for my brother who lives across town and tapped his maple tree.  The sap is fickle and weather conditions have to be right for it.  If you want to try it this year, you could always tap just one tree to see how the sap's flowing.  I'd love to know if you end up making some!

noturavggeek:  that sounds like a yummy treat!!  Good to know if you do that the finished product doesn't taste like hot dogs.  Though there might be a niche market for hot dog flavored syrup, you never know!  :-)

Wulf:  I've also heard of tapping hickory trees.  My brother tapped his maple.  I wish he'd also try his birch tree so we could taste the differences.  Black walnut syrup tastes quite different from maple syrup.  It smells and tastes a lot like cotton candy -- not as edgy a flavor as maple.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
alwaysinmyroom
Craftalongs Moderator
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Life is Moving Along Splendidly
Online Online

Posts: 29863
Joined: 12-Feb-2006

Make all things!!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2010 11:18:36 AM »

I probably would not do it now..the trees need everything they have to make leaves and food!  I do collect the nuts...I find that if you let the green shells "rot" off, you can then take the hard nuts and put them into a tarp and run them over with your car to crack them...the green shell pieces are wonderful for making dyes as well...

we have so many that the squirrels can't get them and many of our neighbors ask to collect them as well...

I was wondering if you know if I collect the leaves if they would make a good weed killer?  I know a lot of plants will not grow around black walnut trees...

Hickory trees?  I really need to get that book!  I am just now learning how to make use of the things on my land...I appreciate all the info from you guys!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

nikschaf
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2010 12:17:26 PM »

Oh yes, I've heard of running over them with your car but never tried it.  I bought a special nutcracker -- the "Nuclear Nutcracker" from Duluth Trading Co.  Also known as the "Get Crackin" nutcracker.  It works well!  I have heard the hulls are good for dyeing.  I've just started getting into spinning and dyeing wool, so that might be an experiment for this summer!

I don't know if the leaves would be a good weed killer, but it makes sense that they could be!  Probably a good worm killer.  Have you ever noticed that when you wash the walnuts after hulling them that all the worms come out of the ground?  The walnuts are toxic to them.  I seem to remember hearing that the leaves could be brewed into a tea for stomach ailments and to kill tapeworms, but I've never tried it.  I also know that some folks grind up the dried green hulls and put them into capsules to take them and kill tapeworms and other digestive parasites.  (Never tried that either.)

The book only mentions birch as an alternate tree, but I found info about hickory somewhere else in my web surfing while researching the black walnut.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Wulf
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 2635
Joined: 07-Oct-2009

Smalltacular is bestter.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2010 06:53:00 PM »

I don't think the leaves would work as a weed killer, as the toxin that prevents other broadleaf plants from growing under walnuts is spread though the roots. The effect of the nut washings on worms might be from the high level of tannic acid in the hulls. That might be what gets the tapeworms, too.

I have a big Manitoba Maple (you might call it a Box Elder) in the back yard that I've been meaning to tap for years. They apparently produce perfectly good maple syrup, just not in the quantities that you get from Sugar Maples. Too late now of course, but now that I know about the milk jug collectors, maybe next year.

Wulf
THIS ROCKS   Logged

alwaysinmyroom
Craftalongs Moderator
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Life is Moving Along Splendidly
Online Online

Posts: 29863
Joined: 12-Feb-2006

Make all things!!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2010 07:00:08 PM »

oh thanks for that info Wulf--I am excited to try this syrup method this fall as well!!

THIS ROCKS   Logged

Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Make a Tulle Skirt
Top 5 Holiday Designer Dresses You Can Rent
Save Vs. Spend: Holiday Edition
An Affordable, Complete Autumn Look
Playful Polish in a Giulietta Dress
Latest Blog Articles
Tute Tuesday: Dark Chocolate Bacon Pecan Pie
Amazing Altered Puzzles
Meatless Monday: Cottage Cheese Mousse

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.