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Topic: Wow. I made a piece of furniture. Ottoman  (Read 9041 times)
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stepitote
« on: April 28, 2005 07:23:45 PM »

So I checked this kind of cheesy book out of the library called "100 Things You Don't Need a Man For." (Lame title, but it has some kind of neat projects, and I love the little British phrases in the captions throughout--things like "Who's a clever girl now?")

Anyway, I decided to try my hand at very basic furniture-building by making the storage ottoman in the book. I think it turned out pretty well. My friends suddenly think I have skills I'm not entirely sure I possess...



I got the fabric very cheap at an outlet north of Minneapolis (it was about $12 total for both the khaki-colored velvet and the green satin for the lining). The sides, top, and bottom are made of particle board I got for less than $10 at Menards. The feet are very large pull knobs (also from Menards) spray-painted gold. The tassle was about $1 at Jo-Ann's. All in all, the project cost me less than $40 (way less than I've seen things like this selling for at Linens & Things and Bed Bath & Beyond). It would have been a bit cheaper if I'd waited for my next 40% off coupon from Jo-Ann to come in the mail and used that for the high-density apolstery foam on the seat. Dang, that stuff is way more expensive than I would have guessed.

Thanks for all the nice comments! I'm happy with how it turned out, too. Parts of it were kind of a pain in the butt, and had me wondering why I bothered to attempt such a thing, but in retrospect, all in all it was pretty easy.

oh man, scan the pages of that book and email them to me! I'm too poor to buy that book!!!
Unfortunately, I'm a bit limited in technology resources (I had to borrow my sister's digital camera just to take the pics), so I don't have a scanner. Check your library, though; that's where I got the book. Also, I noticed Amazon's got some used ones listed for as low as $3 (not including shipping, of course). (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/157145537X/qid=1114874943/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-2582961-4663012)


silly on anyone who thought they actually needed a man to do _anything_ crafty.
Agreed! I have to admit that when I saw the book on the library shelf, I was simultaneously offended and intrigued by the title (and the hot pink cover).  Wink


Nice! I'm guessing construction wise, you make a box, add a lid with hinges, and you're set!...yes? and of course padding and lining and upholstery come into play...but do I have the basics down? For the box, did you use nails, screws, glue, or a combination? Please do share:) It looks great, very professional, and more gratifying than buying a lamer version for way more money.

Yep, that's pretty much the basics. I can kind of summarize the instructions, if it's useful... (I'd attempt a more detailed tutorial if there's enough interest, but I'm hesitant to do so since I didn't take pics during the construction and since I don't know about the legalities copyright-wise, since I followed the book instructions almost exactly.)

1. Assemble the four side pieces to make the body of the box. (Front & back pieces of particle board were 20"x12" and the sides were 18.5"x12" to form a 20" square. All pieces were 5/8" thick.) I reinforced with some glue (liquid nails, since I didn't have carptenter's wood glue on hand) and then drilled in with particle board screws.

2. Glue and screw the bottom piece (20"x20") to form the bottom of the box.

3. Cut a strip of the outside fabric (the khaki velvet, in my case) long enough to wrap around the box (plus a seam allowance), leaving about four inches extra at the top to wrap inward inside the box and a couple inches to wrap under at the bottom as well. I had to piece two strips of fabric together to do this. (I started with 2 yards of fabric, but you need enough leftover for the lid, as well, so keep that in mind before you start cutting.)

4. Sew the big strip of fabric together to make sort of a tube shape and then slide that over the the box to cover the sides all around the box. I stapled a couple of layers of quilt batting around the box before I did this, because I didn't like how sharp the corners still were with just the velvet over them. (This is one place where I varied from the instructions in the book.) Wrap the edges of the fabric over the sides at the top of the box and staple in place inside. Wrap around and staple on the bottom, too.

4. Attach the feet (the giant pull knobs, in my case, since I couldn't find any actual furniture "bun feet" except really big ones that they wanted $8 each for) to the corners on the bottom of the box.

5. Cut the fabric for the lid (about 6" or 7" larger all around than the lid itself, which is 20"x20"). Lay the fabric on the ground, then lay a 20x20" piece of high-density upholstery foam (mine was 3" thick) on it and the particle board lid on top of that. Wrap the fabric around and staple or glue in place. You'll need to fold or gather into pleats at the corners to make it lie flat. I found this part a little troublesome. You don't need to fold the raw edges under, however, since you'll add a square of lining fabric (the green satin, in my case) across the lid to cover those edges.

6. Cut a piece of lining fabric (green satin, in my case) just a bit larger than the lid, turn the raw edges under, and glue in place. I also secured with some brass upholstery tacks (about 79 cents for a little box of them at Jo-Ann's) just because I liked the look better.

7. Make the inside lining by creating another "tube" of fabric to fit around the inside dimensions of the box and then sewing a square to the bottom to cover the base of the box. (I also sewed a seam around the top of the lining, so I wouldn't have to fold the raw edge under consistently when I attached the lining to the box.) Sewing the lining was the most problematic part for me, but I'm not that great a sewer. I ripped out seams three times on this part because I kept screwing it up. But that's just me, I'm sure. Once it all fits just fine, staple or glue it inside the box. I used hot glue, which seemed to hold just fine. I did use a couple staples in each corner for extra reinforcement, but not too many, because I didn't want them to show.

8. Screw in two hinges to attach the lid to the inside of the box. If you're like me, you'll get to this step, be soooo close to done, and then have to wait two hours to add the final screw because your drill battery will die and require recharging. But again, that's probably just me.  Wink

9. Add a tassle to the lid, if you want.

This is much easier and makes a lot more sense with pictures, so I do encourage any of you to locate the book if you want to attempt this. (Then again, you're all crafty and talented folks, so maybe you'll figure it out just fine!)


« Last Edit: March 30, 2011 09:16:37 AM by PixieVal - Reason: added description to title and tutorial to top post » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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littleone1098
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2005 07:35:22 PM »

Nice! I'm guessing construction wise, you make a box, add a lid with hinges, and you're set!...yes? and of course padding and lining and upholstery come into play...but do I have the basics down? For the box, did you use nails, screws, glue, or a combination? Please do share:) It looks great, very professional, and more gratifying than buying a lamer version for way more money.
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"Every morning when I wake up I experince an exquisite joythe joy of being Salvador Daland I ask myself in rapture, What wonderful things this Salvador Dal is going to accomplish today?" -The one and only
knottyjen
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2005 05:50:34 AM »

it is wonderful!!! Cheesy
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2005 05:52:46 AM »

awesome job.  and silly on anyone who thought they actually needed a man to do _anything_ crafty.
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micahstandley
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2005 10:55:14 AM »

EXCELLENT WORK!  That is really fantastic!

If you're into doing other furniture projects, you should check out Todd Oldham's new book, Handmade Modern.  I bought it last week and have been totally obessed ever since...

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0060591250/qid=1114797272/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/102-4193036-5094533?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2005 12:37:40 AM »

oh man, scan the pages of that book and email them to me! I'm too poor to buy that book!!!
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stepitote
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2005 09:17:00 AM »

Thanks for all the nice comments! I'm happy with how it turned out, too. Parts of it were kind of a pain in the butt, and had me wondering why I bothered to attempt such a thing, but in retrospect, all in all it was pretty easy.

oh man, scan the pages of that book and email them to me! I'm too poor to buy that book!!!
Unfortunately, I'm a bit limited in technology resources (I had to borrow my sister's digital camera just to take the pics), so I don't have a scanner. Check your library, though; that's where I got the book. Also, I noticed Amazon's got some used ones listed for as low as $3 (not including shipping, of course). (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/157145537X/qid=1114874943/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-2582961-4663012)


silly on anyone who thought they actually needed a man to do _anything_ crafty.
Agreed! I have to admit that when I saw the book on the library shelf, I was simultaneously offended and intrigued by the title (and the hot pink cover).  Wink


Nice! I'm guessing construction wise, you make a box, add a lid with hinges, and you're set!...yes? and of course padding and lining and upholstery come into play...but do I have the basics down? For the box, did you use nails, screws, glue, or a combination? Please do share:) It looks great, very professional, and more gratifying than buying a lamer version for way more money.

Yep, that's pretty much the basics. I can kind of summarize the instructions, if it's useful... (I'd attempt a more detailed tutorial if there's enough interest, but I'm hesitant to do so since I didn't take pics during the construction and since I don't know about the legalities copyright-wise, since I followed the book instructions almost exactly.)

1. Assemble the four side pieces to make the body of the box. (Front & back pieces of particle board were 20"x12" and the sides were 18.5"x12" to form a 20" square. All pieces were 5/8" thick.) I reinforced with some glue (liquid nails, since I didn't have carptenter's wood glue on hand) and then drilled in with particle board screws.

2. Glue and screw the bottom piece (20"x20") to form the bottom of the box.

3. Cut a strip of the outside fabric (the khaki velvet, in my case) long enough to wrap around the box (plus a seam allowance), leaving about four inches extra at the top to wrap inward inside the box and a couple inches to wrap under at the bottom as well. I had to piece two strips of fabric together to do this. (I started with 2 yards of fabric, but you need enough leftover for the lid, as well, so keep that in mind before you start cutting.)

4. Sew the big strip of fabric together to make sort of a tube shape and then slide that over the the box to cover the sides all around the box. I stapled a couple of layers of quilt batting around the box before I did this, because I didn't like how sharp the corners still were with just the velvet over them. (This is one place where I varied from the instructions in the book.) Wrap the edges of the fabric over the sides at the top of the box and staple in place inside. Wrap around and staple on the bottom, too.

4. Attach the feet (the giant pull knobs, in my case, since I couldn't find any actual furniture "bun feet" except really big ones that they wanted $8 each for) to the corners on the bottom of the box.

5. Cut the fabric for the lid (about 6" or 7" larger all around than the lid itself, which is 20"x20"). Lay the fabric on the ground, then lay a 20x20" piece of high-density upholstery foam (mine was 3" thick) on it and the particle board lid on top of that. Wrap the fabric around and staple or glue in place. You'll need to fold or gather into pleats at the corners to make it lie flat. I found this part a little troublesome. You don't need to fold the raw edges under, however, since you'll add a square of lining fabric (the green satin, in my case) across the lid to cover those edges.

6. Cut a piece of lining fabric (green satin, in my case) just a bit larger than the lid, turn the raw edges under, and glue in place. I also secured with some brass upholstery tacks (about 79 cents for a little box of them at Jo-Ann's) just because I liked the look better.

7. Make the inside lining by creating another "tube" of fabric to fit around the inside dimensions of the box and then sewing a square to the bottom to cover the base of the box. (I also sewed a seam around the top of the lining, so I wouldn't have to fold the raw edge under consistently when I attached the lining to the box.) Sewing the lining was the most problematic part for me, but I'm not that great a sewer. I ripped out seams three times on this part because I kept screwing it up. But that's just me, I'm sure. Once it all fits just fine, staple or glue it inside the box. I used hot glue, which seemed to hold just fine. I did use a couple staples in each corner for extra reinforcement, but not too many, because I didn't want them to show.

8. Screw in two hinges to attach the lid to the inside of the box. If you're like me, you'll get to this step, be soooo close to done, and then have to wait two hours to add the final screw because your drill battery will die and require recharging. But again, that's probably just me.  Wink

9. Add a tassle to the lid, if you want.

This is much easier and makes a lot more sense with pictures, so I do encourage any of you to locate the book if you want to attempt this. (Then again, you're all crafty and talented folks, so maybe you'll figure it out just fine!)

THIS ROCKS   Logged

They say goldfish have no memory; I guess their lives are much like mine, and the little plastic castle is a surprise every time.
littleone1098
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2005 02:27:49 PM »

With such a great explanation, who needs pictures? Thanks so much, I feel as though I need to make one of these some day Smiley
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"Every morning when I wake up I experince an exquisite joythe joy of being Salvador Daland I ask myself in rapture, What wonderful things this Salvador Dal is going to accomplish today?" -The one and only
SKN725
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2005 10:05:40 AM »

Excellent directions!  I have wanted to make about three of these for a long time and a little tray to set on top  so i can throw out the coffee table and have a place to store magazines, etc.  I can do this now!!!! Thanks!!!
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« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2005 12:34:19 PM »

That looks fantastic!  I love constructing furniture.  It's really no harder than most other crafts and the results are so satisfying.  Of course I also have a thing for power tools... My dad taught me that there is no job that cannot be improved with power tools.  Ripping some wood is great for PMS.  And I just noticed how dirty that sounded...  ::ahem:: Cutting wooden boards with the grain on a table saw is great for PMS.  Anyhow, great job!
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