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Topic: Learn to Spin. Step 2: Drafting  (Read 14834 times)
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Ravenau1
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2010 10:13:20 PM »

themuppet, a felt smile is a great idea! I love it  Grin

I am having a laugh at the idea of your little one hugging the fibre lol.  My Hubby is the complete opposite.  He HATES wool of any description lol.  He won't touch it at all, says that the feel of it "gives him the creeps".  I was knitting some squares once and a ball of wool fell off the pile and rolled toward him on the couch, I've never seen him move so quick lol. 


So, I watched the vids and read Jane's instructions so I had a go this morning.  The only issues I had are that I didn't split the fibre quite evenly, and one piece was thicker than the other three, so to get it the same thickness as the others it actually ended up being longer.  Does that make sense? lol.  I have a few thicker and thinner bits going through but I am assuming that's a matter of practice.  I don't want to make it any thinner as I am worried it will break.  Each piece of the original fibre ended up being twice as long after it was drafted.  Is that ok?

Here's what I started out with:




After I divided the 1/2 yard (ish) length and drafted each piece.   You can see the longer piece here!  Embarrassed




Bit closer:








I hope that's not too many pics!  If it is, let me know.

Smiley



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Jane Doe
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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2010 02:28:04 AM »

Say I wanted to make worsted weight yarn.  How thin would be drafted roving have to be for my spun yarn to come out as thick as worsted yarn instead of, say, bulky yarn or sport weight?  Is there a way I can determine how thick my finished yarn will be at the drafting phase?
(Can I get an estimate of the thickness of the yarn by twisting the drafted roving or something?)

Well, the reason you mightn't have found it in a tutorial, is that there's not really a straight forward answer to your question. But I'll have a stab at answering it Smiley

What determines the thickness of the final yarn
When you pre-draft your wool, it does indeed thin out your drafted roving.
But it will become thinner again, when you spin the wool. By how much, depends on the spinner. Truly, everyone has a different style even when taught by the same teacher. It's about what feels right for you.

When you are creating plied yarn, there are more factors again.
The blue and the yellow are both "singles" and the one on the right is plied

The plied yarn has the same factors as the singles, then twisted together (double the thickness) then has more thickness again, because the two singles have less twist in them now that they're plied.

Oh, and did I mention bloom?
Bloom is when the fibers fluff out a little after soaking the yarn, and setting the twist.
This happens with both types of yarn (singles or plied yarn)

So, how do you get what you want?
         Know thy self
Pre-draft, spin, set the twist, measure it's thickness.
Have a look at what you've created, check out it's WPI, but also knit with it.
I find that I like to work with slightly larger needles when working with my handspun. Reason being, unlike machine produced yarn, there will be texture to it.
But you might be different. That's why it's important to know what you create, and then see what works for you.

When you see what your handspun is like to work with, you can then work backwards to change your next yarn.  Smiley
Your style will mostly be evident during the spinning process, so I've found it's easier to control the thickness in the pre-drafting stage. So either pre-draft more or less for your next yarn. When spinning even 2ply yarn, I like to stay true to my spinning style, and alter the other factors to change the yarn.

Thanks for asking the question, and do let me know if this has raised more questions.
Spinning is quite a personal thing.
Every tiny part of your yarn is closely scrutinized and manipulated as it passes through your fingers at least twice if not more while creating it.
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sarahj2001
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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2010 05:22:48 AM »

Those videos are great..I wondered what to do with the batts. 

When spinning even 2ply yarn, I like to stay true to my spinning style, and alter the other factors to change the yarn.
My problem has been I spin my yarn soo thin and I try so hard to do thicker..you say "alter the other factors to change the yarn"  So...you mean draft less?  or are there other factors too?

Also, while I'm asking questions...I know you're not covering carding here but it's along the same lines as batts/roving....maybe you can answer this here or at least point me to the right place.  When I card my wool with hand carders, I make rolags, right?  So, would I just spin straight from those or is there a nice way to make those into roving (maybe not the right term...but make them into a longer piece)?
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Jane Doe
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« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2010 06:16:55 AM »

He won't touch it at all, says that the feel of it "gives him the creeps".  I was knitting some squares once and a ball of wool fell off the pile and rolled toward him on the couch, I've never seen him move so quick lol. 

Hehe - this had me giggling. ^_^

The only issues I had are that I didn't split the fibre quite evenly, and one piece was thicker than the other three, so to get it the same thickness as the others it actually ended up being longer.

You have excellent intuition - that's the perfect thing to do.
Judging by your pictures, it looks like you've done a great job on your drafting  Smiley

I have a few thicker and thinner bits going through but I am assuming that's a matter of practice.  I don't want to make it any thinner as I am worried it will break. 

When you come to spinning the drafted wool, you'll have a second chance to smooth out any unevenness in your yarn. I agree that as a spinner we should aim for perfection (in that aim, we become better spinners with more control over what we spin) but I think that in that aim, we sometimes we overlook the beauty of texture.
However your yarn looks at the end of your spinning, learn from it, but also love it for what it is   Grin
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Jane Doe
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« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2010 06:53:21 AM »

My problem has been I spin my yarn soo thin and I try so hard to do thicker..you say "alter the other factors to change the yarn"  So...you mean draft less?  or are there other factors too?

For a thicker yarn, there are a few things you can do
Split less and draft less is one, but also putting a little less spin in your singles is another.
If your yarn is twisted too tight, it can turn out a little like rope.
If you're done quite a bit of spinning and you'd like to try something a little more difficult, you could also try spinning the fibers a little differently. Traditionally there are 2 ways to spin. (there's more now with the advent of art yarns). The types are called woollen and worsted. Spinning from the tip of the fiber, the way you probably already spin, is called worsted. It's the way that we're going to spin in this tutorial. But a different style that involves spinning from the middle of each fiber, and blends more air into the yarn, is called woollen. I don't know where you're at with your spinning skill, but you've mentioned that you're spinning from rolags.
Spinning from the loop with rolags is spinning worsted style.
It will add more air into your yarn Smiley

However, if you'd like to make your hand-carded wool into something that looks more like roving (so you can spin worsted style) I think you could do it using a diz.....
Hopefully someone more experienced with the hackle & diz can give you more help.
Basically, it's drawing out the fiber through a little hole.
This process will skip the drafting process, and give you fibers that are ready to start spinning from.
In the following clip: in the first half of the clip, she is loading the hackle.
From half way along (at about 2:40), you can see her using the diz.
In her case, she's using a wooden heart with a little hole as her diz, ad she pulls the fibers through.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8u_Or5vIrM

Untouchableface has shown pictures on craftster of her own homemade hackle & diz set
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=308767.0

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Cheyenneswthrt07
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« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2010 06:57:56 AM »

I understand about predrafting, but it didn't really work for me in the begining, I got lots of thin spots and odd spots that didn't feel right.  I split my roving and then when I park I draft to get the thickness I'm looking for.  I hope that's OK for this lesson.
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Jane Doe
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« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2010 07:05:34 AM »

Heh- I'm not going to mark you on your homework Wink
But I'm happy to help if you like.
I'm more providing the info on drafting etc so everyone has the opportunity to make design choices later on in their spinning.

Picture time!
I've taken a foot of roving, split it in half (just the once) so I had two identical pieces.
I drafted one piece so you could see the difference.





Kind of like before and after pictures to compare  Smiley
« Last Edit: January 29, 2010 01:45:44 PM by Jane Doe » THIS ROCKS   Logged

themuppet
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« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2010 09:13:37 AM »

whoa that's quite a difference... the color change is fascinating!
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Jane Doe
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« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2010 01:53:55 PM »

If I hadn't split the roving, and drafted from the full thickness of the roving, the color change would be more gradual.
I've seen spinners draft from the whole thickness of roving, to preserve that color change effect in their final knitted project.
I'd love to knit a hat with yarn made in that style.


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Belladune
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« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2010 04:45:21 PM »

I'm going to admit that, Ravenau1, your drafting is much better then mine... are you sure you haven't done this before? I'll have to try and be more patient I guess.
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