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Topic: Cold Porcelain Clay  (Read 12493 times)
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aethelberga
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2010 12:16:54 PM »

This looks like fun. Thanks for turning me on to this.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2010 03:06:16 PM »

Very nice job! All look really good.
But sorry you can't find any polymer clays where you are. Grin  (You can always mail order any of the polymer clay brands and lines from other countries if you want though --e.g., from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Philippines, etc):
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/supplysources.htm (click on Non-USA)

Quote
Clear nail polish, by the way, has no longevity (I found that out the hard way) so until I order in some Sculpey Glaze, I left the rest unpainted/unglazed

I'm not sure why that happened (and what exactly did happen re "longevity"?) since all air dry clays should be fine with most all clear sealers (or acrylic paints, etc), including clear fingernail polishes, as long as they are completely dried first.  Since cold porcelain can take a more than a day (or even up to a week to thoroughly dry), did you perhaps just coat the cold porcelain too soon?
(Btw, the newest version of Sculpey Glaze is just a clear gloss "polyurethane" so you should be able to buy that at any hardware store--for sealing bare wood-- and use that, cheaper too.  For non-polymer items, made from air dry clays, even the non-water based clear finishes can be used.)

Quote
Has anyone else experimented with Cold Porcelain clay before?

Yes, but not so much in the U.S. as in the East, Far East, and Brazil where polymer clays aren't as easily available.  We do have a few jars of it around though if one looks --not cheap though--and not as cheap as other air-dry clays.

There's a bunch of info on cold porcelain-type clays on these pages of my polymer clay site, if you want to check them out:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/sculpture.htm (...click on Air Dry Clays, then scroll down a ways to Cold Porcelain Clays)
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/armatures-temp.htm (...click on Cold Porcelain)

As for colorants, you should be able to add color into the raw cold porcelain as well as painting or coating it with other colorants after it dries, if you want. 
I'm impressed that you were able to make your own though and have it handle well since mostly I've heard the stuff made completely at home has many more problems than the premixed stuff, or even the paste that's mixed at home.

Some of the other disadvantages I've heard for cold porcelains are like other air-dry clays, but some are a bit different... e.g.:
...dries in 24 hrs - 3 days, depending on thickness (full cure, one week?)...though can also be oven-dried after just dried to the touch
...does not allow for much highly-detail so more useful for making objects and sculpts that do not have fine details (than polymer clays)
...dries out pretty fast while working with it
...shrinks around 10% while drying (but that's less shrinkage than with many other air-dry clays which can be as high as 30%)
...the raw paste-clay can have color incorporated into it, or it can be painted after drying ....at least one brand has several colors already mixed
...some of its characteristics can vary from packet to packet, or due to shelf life
...must be very well sealed after drying ...otherwise will be dissolved with water, and will absorb humidity over time

Diane B.




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sprinklez
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2010 03:23:42 PM »

Those look really nice. You did a lovely job painting them, at first I assumed the clay itself was colored.
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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2010 03:39:31 PM »

Looks great!
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McJulie-O
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2010 07:03:51 PM »

I didn't know anything about them  before now, but I'm fixin' to.  Smiley
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starmumplus
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2010 03:37:11 AM »

wow they r grate iv never worked with cold porcelain befor i didnt even know you could make it your self way to go
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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2010 03:42:50 AM »



Quote
Clear nail polish, by the way, has no longevity (I found that out the hard way) so until I order in some Sculpey Glaze, I left the rest unpainted/unglazed

I'm not sure why that happened (and what exactly did happen re "longevity"?) since all air dry clays should be fine with most all clear sealers (or acrylic paints, etc), including clear fingernail polishes, as long as they are completely dried first.  Since cold porcelain can take a more than a day (or even up to a week to thoroughly dry), did you perhaps just coat the cold porcelain too soon?

I didn't suspect it would take longer than a day to dry actually. I glazed them over the next day. The reason I said that it doesn't last long is because for the one piece that I glazed it with and wore, the polish wore away and the paint underneath started chipping off. I figured that it was because I used nail polish since... the same thing happens on our nails. Undecided

This is it only three days of daily wear (showers included... maybe that's why?) :



 Sad

I'm definitely looking into polyurethane! THANK YOU for making it so much more simpler. And also for your tips and those links, they contain loads of useful information - I've been checking them out since last night!
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« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2010 08:52:15 AM »

That's an awesome idea for your situation. That's awesome! It would be fun to play with.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2010 11:08:31 AM »

Quote
This is it only three days of daily wear (showers included... maybe that's why?) :

I think in this particular case, the problem might have been the hole(s) rather than the finish/glaze.  

Notice that the chipping away of the paint and sealer on these pieces is right next to the hole you made for the eye pin rather than anywhere else.  I'm assuming that the water got into the clay from around the pin (or U-shaped wire), and even just a little water will undermine air-dry clays.  
If you hadn't been taking showers, it might not have happened though since the amount of humidity (vs. shower water) getting into the hole would have been a lot less.  

If you want to try again with an air-dry clay, I'd suggest putting a lot of clear finish around the eye pin where it goes into the hole and hope there won't be enough stress on the eye pin to allow a tiny crack to form there to let water in (or don't take showers with the jewelry on at least).  
You could even repair these by letting the clay that's exposed dry out thoroughly (maybe even a week or so), then add more paint and much more sealer.

You might also be able to figure out a way to seal the entire inside of the hole before gluing in an eye pin or U-shaped-wire, or something (in that case, I'd probably use a strong clear glue like a 2-part epoxy, or maybe E6000 or a strong white glue... or you could just make sure that the entire hole is filled in with the glue as well as the opening areas).
Single-shank connectors like eye pins, etc., will hold best in polymer clay if there will be any later stress if they also create a mechanical hold than just an adhesive hold though, so clayers often bend the shanks of their eye pins before inserting into the clay then snug the hole (or slit) back around the shank.  That might work with air-dry clay too as long as the area around the entry area are also well sealed.

What do you think?

Diane B.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2010 11:09:05 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2010 06:00:17 PM »

I've never tried this... and it looks fascinating. Your work is lovely!  Smiley
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