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Topic: Mini Art Nouveau Mirror  (Read 2201 times)
Tags for this thread: real_metal_powder , mica_powder  Add new tag
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2010 09:09:40 AM »

It seems like since the real-metal clays have been created, fewer clayers are using the faux metal techniques.  It's good to see more of them since they can be so convincing and of course much cheaper than using metal clay.  
 
Have you tried any of the real-metal powders yet too?  They're even more of a "hard, sharp" metal look than the mica powders so great when that kind of look is needed...of course no reason those powders shouldn't look that way since they are actually metal particles.  The main two brands are Mona Lisa's Real Metal Powders (in about 10 metal-type colors) and I think the old original ones, made by Eberhard Faber, are discontinued now but they used to sell them in colors like red, blue, green, purple, etc, too:
http://craft-supplies.misterart.com/store/view/003/group_id/8953/Mona-Lisa-Mixing-Metal-Powder.htm
http://polymerclayexpress.com/powders.html
http://www.jons-all-sorts.co.uk/hi/67/66929/x0529-ama.jpg
(do be more careful of not getting the real-metal powders into the air and then into your lungs if you use them though)
These real metal powders are also used in some of the metallic waxes used on polymer clay.  Since they are real metal though, most of them will oxidize unlike mica powders so need to be sealed.

...this lesson on making a faux cloissone pin uses real-metal powder for the double-molded bezel (with tinted liquid clay in each cell for the "enamel"):
http://www.hgtv.com/crafting/clay-cloisonneacute-pin/index.html
...and made into a paint:
http://www.polymerclayexpress.com/images/wreath14.jpg
...brushed onto a mini sculpt or cast
http://pcpolyzine.com/0301january/robc5.jpg
...more tips for ways to use (most would apply to mica powders too):
http://www.queensink.com/Products/houstonartmetallicpowder.html

Diane B.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2010 09:12:15 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
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Blitherypoop
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2010 10:46:15 AM »

Diane, I'm worried enough about breathing in the Pearl-Ex.   Tongue  The metal ones would make me too nervous.
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2010 10:23:58 AM »

Quote
Diane, I'm worried enough about breathing in the Pearl-Ex.     The metal ones would make me too nervous.

I wouldn't worry about the Pearl Ex at all unless you were actually a worker manufacturing it, over a lifetime, and weren't using any safety precautions at all.  It's no worse than breathing in much of the soil/sand/rust/etc you happen to be close to or that's present in your wider environment. 

The real metal powders are actually tiny corkscrews in shape though, so they can work down into the lungs in a way that's more permanent.  Even that isn't all that bad unless it's in a long-term or high-quantity situation.  Still, it's just a prudent lifestyle choice to apply it with a finger, not to brush on with vigor using a fluffy brush getting some of it airborne or at least not do that a lot for years, to pour gently if pouring is necessary and use paper underneath that can be discarded, or to wear a light-dust mask of some kind and eyeglasses. 

(Unfortunately, there's a load of insoluble particulate matter we inhale in an industrialized country all the time that we'd rather not have in our lungs, just no choice.  But we can often at least limit the obvious and more serious ones with laws and educated prudence.)

Diane B.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Blitherypoop
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2010 12:40:24 PM »

Yeah, for simple shapes I use my finger, but with crevices like this project that doesn't work.  I essentially hold the project as far from myself as my arms allow and prefer to do it under the vent hood for my stove, near an open window, in the center of a room away from where I was working, etc.
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