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Topic: sea monster linocut progress shots and some linocut tips  (Read 2835 times)
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saintvier
« on: December 14, 2009 12:12:52 AM »

So I already posted some pictures of the finished print in my last post, but I just found all these WIP shots I took and thought they deserved a thread of their own.

To prepare my linoleum I sanded it with a very fine grade of sandpaper to get rid of any tiny nicks and to take the sharpness off the edges so they wouldn't cut the felts on the press. I then stained it with a mixture of etching inks and mineral spirits so there'd be a larger contrast between areas I'd cut away and areas I hadn't. I used red--it gives just the barest tinge of color to the block.

My original drawing. You can see I didn't take the time to fully plan it out before I started printing, which caused me some headaches later on!


And the back of the drawing, where I traced the image using a light table once I remembered my image would be reversed when printed.


The missing steps here are of me tracing the drawing yet again with a transfer sheet between it and my linoleum, and then going over parts of that drawing with marker so it showed up better/didn't smear, and so that I wouldn't get confused about what I was supposed to carve away and what was supposed to stay.

I've just started carving my plate here--you can see I got lazy about filling in with markers.


An action shot of my bench hook, which keeps the block from sliding away while you're carving, and all of my tools. I had a Speedball tool and a fancy German tool. I used my Speedball most, because it had the smallest and sharpest tip, but the German tool was pretty nice.


A later shot of my plate. I used a wide-tipped marker (in this case, a Prismacolor) to lightly go over the plate in areas after I carved so I could see where ink would go and adjust as necessary.


And a picture of the resultant print.


ETA: I meant to put that if anyone has any questions about the process, feel free to ask!
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009 12:24:49 AM by saintvier » THIS ROCKS   Logged
HandicraftTreasures
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2009 03:48:14 AM »

This looks amazing. Interesting to have a look at the various stages of your work. I just bought a book about different printing methods and I will definitely try out carving linoleum.
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darkladymajesta
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2009 09:36:27 AM »

I did something like this a long time ago (and not nearly as cool or complicated!) Love it Cheesy
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lindsayeris
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2010 02:25:38 PM »

Is it linoleum like a piece of tile?  Like from Home Depot?  A-maze-ing.
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