A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Did you know you can view all images posted by a member? Learn how here!
Total Members: 296,625
Currently Running With Scissors:
662 Guests and 31 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Charity Knitting Dilemma  (Read 2287 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
lolaforpresident
« on: November 22, 2009 12:44:23 PM »

I like to knit and I love homeless people (I was one). But when I look at charities that want knit donations to give to the homeless I look at it from the perspective of being homeless. It is nice to have a handmade warm hat, but style is not important on the street. In fact the nicer the stuff you have, the more of a target you become.

Also, people tend to knit with really fancy yarns which are possibly not machine washable and so expensive you could buy the entire stock of hats at the dollar store. Blankets especially unnerve me. I have seen blankets left on the street by other homeless people to be thrown away by the street clean up people.

I hate to think of people putting so much work into something that will be thrown away after one use or worse yet get someone robbed (why people rob homeless people I will never know).

I don't mean to criticize anyone or imply that I will not be donating to these charities because I believe homeless people should be able to have something that took time and care to make. I was just wondering if it is worth the effort and cost. I wonder if it wouldn't be better to make an item, sell it, and then use the proceeds to buy backpacks or something. I don't know though. I am probably going to be donating red heart creations to my local shelter or leaving them around town for someone to find. I just wanted to see what others thought.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
kittykill
Global Moderator
Guest Blogger
Needlework Moderator
Occasions and Holidays Moderator

Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 28942
Joined: 25-Sep-2004

I got 99 problems, but a stitch ain't one.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2009 06:12:49 PM »

That's a really interesting perspective and I think one to consider for your area. Maybe contact the shelters first would be a good idea? I am always down for a good craft show-maybe one for different agency would be good too. Thanks for sharing your thoughts-definitely something to think about Smiley
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Idle Hands
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2009 04:54:03 PM »

I would not have thought the nicer the donation the more the receiver might be a target.  That is really sad that the homeless can't have something nice without having to worry about their safety.

I have been making scarves and hats with basic acrylic yarn for the annual warm-up clothing drives we have at work.  As much as I enjoy making the items, I do see your point with buying basic clothing.  Maybe I'll do a combination of making and buying winter wear going forward. I'll keep an eye out for the end of season sales too.

Thank you for your perspective.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

What would you get if you crossed a goat and a sheep?
An animal that eats tin cans and gives back steel wool.
smittenheart
Offline Offline

Posts: 3419
Joined: 10-Jan-2008

Let go of what's already gone..


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2009 06:37:18 PM »

I was totally wondering about this the other day..I was thinking about what happens to the blankets and such after the weather warms up..shelter is a good idea..

I ALWAYS wonder about when donating to a cause either how much directly goes to the person in need and also how usable is the item that is donated .. though the intention is good..I want the gift to be as useful as possible..
THIS ROCKS   Logged

its ME!!
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=327537.0
 
http://cowandpigdesigns.etsy.com
http://cowandpigdesigns.blogspot.com
Soap licking is dangerous..please dont try it at home

will trade some soap for a superhero cape which will be used by the kid in my avatar ^^
Cibo
Offline Offline

Posts: 34
Joined: 18-Nov-2009

Registered since 2004, but forgot log-info. :B


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2009 11:50:24 PM »

I've never heard of organizations accepting knitted goods, before.

Though, I have heard that one of the easiest things homeless people can acquire is clothing. I imagine one way is to go through the clothing/shoe donation metal boxes.

In contrast to that, things that would be hard to find is fresh, hot food, toiletries, a place to shower, and a place to sleep. And the things beyond that - such as a permanent home and a steady income - are highly difficult. I don't have personal experience, but I imagine that what can be done is to offer a hot meal, a shower, and a comfy bed. At least for now before we start addressing the bigger stuff. 

Anyways, I like the idea of selling the knitted goods and giving the profits to organizations, maybe to shelters.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
lolaforpresident
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2009 12:43:39 PM »

In my experience food is relatively easy, at least in Portland OR. What is hard is finding backpacks, deodorant (for work when you cant get to the laundry), laundry, showers (usually very restrictive on when you can get one), shelters for men (but we always slept outside together), and razors.

The worst part is the way services often treat you like you are a criminal. And they have restrictive rules like curfews and requiring you to watch a sermon before eating. If you miss the sermon, you can't eat, even if they have leftovers. Everyone blames the individual for being homeless, but that is my rant.

Another thing you wouldn't think of is tampons/pads. There were some nice girls who gave me a bag of them, but I don't know how available they were. And shoes that fit and are waterproof and clean socks are absolutely necessary. But I would also like to stress a good backpack. I had a over the shoulder bag (ouch!).
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Buns
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2009 07:29:09 PM »


The worst part is the way services often treat you like you are a criminal. And they have restrictive rules like curfews and requiring you to watch a sermon before eating. If you miss the sermon, you can't eat, even if they have leftovers. Everyone blames the individual for being homeless, but that is my rant.


.... that's so crappy and sad.   
THIS ROCKS   Logged
kittykill
Global Moderator
Guest Blogger
Needlework Moderator
Occasions and Holidays Moderator

Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 28942
Joined: 25-Sep-2004

I got 99 problems, but a stitch ain't one.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2009 07:36:00 PM »

In my experience food is relatively easy, at least in Portland OR. What is hard is finding backpacks, deodorant (for work when you cant get to the laundry), laundry, showers (usually very restrictive on when you can get one), shelters for men (but we always slept outside together), and razors.

The worst part is the way services often treat you like you are a criminal. And they have restrictive rules like curfews and requiring you to watch a sermon before eating. If you miss the sermon, you can't eat, even if they have leftovers. Everyone blames the individual for being homeless, but that is my rant.

Another thing you wouldn't think of is tampons/pads. There were some nice girls who gave me a bag of them, but I don't know how available they were. And shoes that fit and are waterproof and clean socks are absolutely necessary. But I would also like to stress a good backpack. I had a over the shoulder bag (ouch!).


The agency I work for in Portland provides bath/personal stuff like that. I'm definitely gonna pass along the backpacks though, and make sure we have them. There are definitely not enough couples shelters in any city.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

fantasticmio
Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Yarn Hacker
Offline Offline

Posts: 3013
Joined: 01-Nov-2006

Smells like chicken!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2010 11:42:11 AM »

During my time with Blankets For Canada we ran across the problem of "nice looking" blankets being rejected. The problem, as we heard it, was that the homeless people were being accused of stealing them, so they'd bring them back and ask for a less-nice looking one. Sad

I think there are different types of donations we can make, and that they all have their place.

Donating money is usually the best because agencies can usually buy more with that money than we can.

Donating items (like deoderant and pads and such) is good when you have that stuff and don't need it.

Donating handmade goods is good for adding that personal touch. Like, "people are thinking of you". You have to be careful about what you make, and what you make it out of, though, as described above.

Your best bet with any of this is to find out what the charities need, and try to fill that need.  Don't just try to foist some wool hats on a charity that is only dealing with acrylic blankets... Know what I mean?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Craftsunderground
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2010 12:42:58 PM »

Our area has a newspaper that is published and sold by the homeless. They write articles and reviews, submit photos, and are profiled in each issue. I have learned a great deal about being homeless from this newspaper. Many of my preconceived notions were proved wrong.
Money is what the people need most, donated through reputable organizations. Purchasing the newspaper pays the vendors directly. They purchase their newspapers for $.35 and sell them for a dollar, keeping the profit. But to really change things, the organizations that provide health services, job counseling, and basic shelter must be funded. Not all of us can donate money, so calling a shelter and asking what they want is the best thing to do. Rather than picking a cause and trying to fit your craft in, try looking for charities that are soliciting items that you already craft. There are definately charities that are looking for blankets and hats for hospital patients, for example. There is plenty of need to go around.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Teesha Moore inspired patches--anyone want to swap?
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Learn Devil Went Down to Georgia on Fiddle Part 2
Learn Devil Went Down to Georgia on Fiddle, Part 1
How to Print a Coloring Book Using Personal Photos
Violin Lessons - How to Use the Violin Bow
How to Learn Basic Blackjack Strategy
Latest Blog Articles
Winner of Craft Challenge #100-Pottermouth
July 23, 2014 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Fabric and Felt Bird Ornament

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.