A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: When you post a project, remember that you can always click the Modify button to edit the post and add additional information.
Total Members: 298,777
Currently Running With Scissors:
424 Guests and 6 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: 1 2 [3] 4  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: What you need to know to screen print (General Info. and Tutorial)  (Read 45185 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
Amy Lou
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2006 05:01:19 AM »

First I want to say THANKYOU for that awesome tutorial... I have made loads of mistakes but I did finally complete a run of two silkcreen shirt styles...the only snafu is how to get the veratex ink to stay on the shirts? i iron them and iron them but they still seem to fade? should i use the fixer (i have only read about it) or do you have any other suggestions or ink choices....also glad to hear about another kind of emulsion!  thanks again amylou
ps i am printing on regular old tshirts
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Amy Lou
« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2006 05:05:27 AM »

oh and where do you get your supplies from...especially the roll on emulsion? thanks again. amylou
ps i have a blog if you want to check it out?

www.ifthebirdsknew.blogspot.com
THIS ROCKS   Logged
HeathenPeddler
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2006 08:49:39 PM »

C. Stencil(Emulsion):  You have several different choices with these.
        1.  Direct emulsions is a liquid that you coat both sides of the screen with. There are two types, go with Diazo. This type is pretty cheap.
      2.  Capillary comes in sheets that are fast and fabu to apply to the screen (these are my favorite).  They are more expensive but easier and more consistent to use.

Does anyone have any info on these capillary sheets? Particularly in the UK? They sound like the best way to get started, even if they are not so cheap.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Wassail!
HP

Heathen Tees from The Heathen Peddler

FEW FIND FORTUNE, BUT WORK IS HARD TO AVOID.
speedingpullet
« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2007 09:44:40 AM »

I've got a couple of questions - as a total, total newbie...?

I'm looking to print a simple design on the soles of the knitted kid's slipper/socks I'm making in puff ink (you know like "Toastie" socks, only...better), so that the soles have some grip for leetle feets.

As a complete ignoramous, is there anything arcane/inherintley evil about puff ink? Do I need to worry overmuch about fine detail? Anything else you'd reccommend? Know the name of a good puff ink for just this purpose?

Sorry for the clueless questions, but I'm, well, clueless. I missed the screen printing lesson in school art class (though I make a mean lino-cut), and have been trying to catch up since 1976...
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Nizzy
Getting Crafty in PA
Offline Offline

Posts: 16
Joined: 07-Jun-2007

View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2007 02:54:00 PM »

I know this is old, but about how expensive would the materials be for this craft.  I am currently looking to do about 4 t-shirts and I don't want to spend too too much on something I may not use again or very often.

Thanks!

Nizzy
THIS ROCKS   Logged

pfirsch
Offline Offline

Posts: 575
Joined: 02-Aug-2004

Una vida de miedo es una media vida


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2007 07:21:20 PM »

I know this is old, but about how expensive would the materials be for this craft.  I am currently looking to do about 4 t-shirts and I don't want to spend too too much on something I may not use again or very often.

Thanks!

Nizzy
From what I saw at Instructables, I figure that you could spend less than $20 for everything.  Please take into account that I have no idea how much the emulsion costs.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Sanderpoo
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2008 10:29:36 AM »

Holey moley guacamole! I get eaten by classes and life for a couple years, come back, and this topic is a sticky. Im going to be blushing for days.

Here are some horrifically late answers to all your questions:


how to get the veratex ink to stay on the shirts?


I tried to research veratex ink to find out exactly what it was made out of, but I couldnt find anything. So, Im going to guess that it is a photopolymer ink.

Photopolymer inks have to be heated to 320 degrees Fahrenheit  before they cure. Now, in professional screen printing shops they have big dryers that look like pizza ovens. Ive never tried this, but I think you could heat up your oven and place the shirt in there for a minute or two.

Just remember that you need the ink to reach 320, so the oven will probably have to be considerably higher.


where do you get your supplies from...especially the roll on emulsion?

My college is nice enough to supply all the things I need to screen print. Im not sure who they are getting it from.

However, www.ulano.com gives listings of their distributors by region all over the world. Also, they make capillary film emulsion, so the dudes they list are probably going to be able to get some for you.



Does anyone have any info on these capillary sheets? Particularly in the UK?

www.ulano.com has all kinds of information about the capillary sheets they make. If you click on products, you can read all about them and how wonderful they are.

Here is the page with the list of all their UK distributors: http://www.ulano.com/dist/dist_europe.htm

I think that should be enough to get you started.


is there anything arcane/inherintley evil about puff ink?

Yes. In order for it to actually puff up it has to reach a certain temperature and remain there at a certain amount of time. I think this would be difficult to do at home.


Do I need to worry overmuch about fine detail?

No, holding fine detail in textile printing is difficult. You can only hold a dot as small as the holes of the mesh on your screen. The only think you can do is move to a finer screen mesh, but then youll be laying down less ink and not getting the puff you want.

Anything else you'd reccommend? Know the name of a good puff ink for just this purpose?

Nope, but those were some damn fine questions. I had to consult my notes on the puff ink. Also, Im totally jealous that you can do lino-cuts.  Hope your adventures in screen printing go well.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"I'm not sure if that was a man or a woman, but I'm attracted to it." - My bestest friend
Sanderpoo
« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2008 10:34:52 AM »

And here is the last bit that I wrote for this topic. I wrote this on April 21, 2005. It's taken me almost three years to get around to posting it. How embarrassing!

Last up is random little tidbits and advice that I have.

1.  Here is how to get your image the perfect distance from the collar of your shirt.  Lay your hand flat on the shirt with your index finger at the bottom of the collar.  Now look at where you pinky is.  That is where the top of your image should be once you print.  You can mark it off with a piece of masking tape or something then eyeball it when you print.

2.  Print a couple of times on a piece of paper before you do the really thing.  This way you can tell it is going to look fabu.  If there are any spots where there is a hole in your stencil and ink is coming through, just take some masking tape and cover it up (on the bottom side of your screen).

3.  If you are using enamel inks, you need to work speedy fast.  If you dawdle, your ink will dry in your screen.  Not can. Will.  Look at what you are printing, and if the edges and little lines arent printing, then your ink is drying in.  To combat this, keep your screen flooded while you arent printing.  If it is already dried in, do a flood stroke and then take your squeegee and rub it on those areas a little bit to knock that dried ink out.  Now, if that doesnt work, you are going to have to pull out the big guns and put some Press Wash(or whatever you are using in place of it) on a rag and rub it on the bottom side of your screen where you have drying in.

4.  Plastisol ink is not water soluble.  This means that if you get some on your hands(cheek, floor, etc.), it wont just dry on there.  You need to wipe it off with a rag.  This applies to your squeegee also.  Dont try to wash it off, it wont work.  Believe me, a rag is the way to go. Also, dont leave it to dry, because it wont, it has to heat up to 320 degrees before that happens.

5.  Process color is CMYK color, with these colors you can mix and make lots of different colors. For example, in Photoshop, when you are picking a new color, there are all these letters with number values next to them.  Most of you have probably seen colors have something like R-52 G-34 B-18.  Look and see if you can put in values for the CMYK.  Now if you make a color that you like, record the values for each of those colors and then you can use those numbers to reproduce the color when you print.  For example, you make a color that has the values of C-60 M-10 Y-30 K-0.  When you decide to make this color, use 6 parts Cyan, 1 part Magenta, 3 parts Yellow, and no Black. (K stands for black in CMYK)

Ive checked out prices for kits and things to see how much this is all going to run you.  Here are my findings, these prices and everything were found at dickblick.com:
Speedball Fabric Screen Printing Tool Kit:
-10" 14" frame
-fabric squeegee
-screen filler, 4 oz
-drawing fluid, 4 oz
-Diazo photo emulsion, 4 oz
- g sensitizer
-paint brush
-screen printing instruction book

Cost:  $32.99
I dont know what the drawing fluid is.  Im guessing that it is just block out or can be used that way.  The sensitizer is part of the Diazo, so I think that with that they are just trying to make it sound like you are getting more.  If you get this, you are still going to have to buy some inks.  But over all, this look fairly decent.

Speedball Ultimate Screen Printing Kit:
-8" 10" frame
-10" 14" frame
-graphic squeegee
-fabric squeegee
-Screen Filler, 4 oz
-Drawing Fluid, 4 oz
-Diazo Emulsion, 4 oz
-sensitizer, g
-accessory kit
-Acrylic Screen Printing Inks 4 oz each of Process Cyan, Process Magenta, Process Yellow and Black
-Fabric Screen Printing Inks 4 oz each of Red, and 4 oz Black[/i]
   Cost: $96.00
I dont like everything in this package. It looks like the type of thing where you are going to end up getting things that you are never going to use.

Naz Dar Inks (Im going on a tour of this company on Friday. Hoorah for field trips!)
These are for graphics printing, like paper, metal, cardboard, flat things.  There are lots of colors and different types. They look to be running about $30.00 a quart, but Im thinking that they might be cheaper if you go through a different company. Also, this is a super professional company. If you are wanting to print posters and what not at home, then you can use regular old house paint.

Speedball Textile
These are for textile printing, they look fairly easy to use.  A quart of one of these will set you back about $17.00.  But there is also a starter kit that has six colors in 4oz. jars for $17.00.  The starter kit seems like a good idea to me. Also, if you look around, you can find 8 oz. jars for around $8.

Union Maxopake Plastisol Ink
These are plastisol, so if you are going to use them you need a way to dry them properly.  They cost about $17 to $21.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"I'm not sure if that was a man or a woman, but I'm attracted to it." - My bestest friend
goofipinay
« Reply #28 on: March 04, 2008 04:24:37 PM »

Ive checked out prices for kits and things to see how much this is all going to run you.  Here are my findings, these prices and everything were found at dickblick.com:
Speedball Fabric Screen Printing Tool Kit:
-10" 14" frame
-fabric squeegee
-screen filler, 4 oz
-drawing fluid, 4 oz
-Diazo photo emulsion, 4 oz
- g sensitizer
-paint brush
-screen printing instruction book

Cost:  $32.99
I dont know what the drawing fluid is.  Im guessing that it is just block out or can be used that way.  The sensitizer is part of the Diazo, so I think that with that they are just trying to make it sound like you are getting more.  If you get this, you are still going to have to buy some inks.  But over all, this look fairly decent.

Speedball Ultimate Screen Printing Kit:
-8" 10" frame
-10" 14" frame
-graphic squeegee
-fabric squeegee
-Screen Filler, 4 oz
-Drawing Fluid, 4 oz
-Diazo Emulsion, 4 oz
-sensitizer, g
-accessory kit
-Acrylic Screen Printing Inks 4 oz each of Process Cyan, Process Magenta, Process Yellow and Black
-Fabric Screen Printing Inks 4 oz each of Red, and 4 oz Black[/i]
   Cost: $96.00
I dont like everything in this package. It looks like the type of thing where you are going to end up getting things that you are never going to use.

I wanted to ask if anyone's ever used that...
Because I took a class on screenprinting, but since I'm not in the class anymore, no free access to the screenprinting press! Plus, my teacher's not used to hearing DIY kinda screenprinting or kits or anything...

Oh yea; when you said to expose the emulsion; do you have a dark room and anything special to expose it with??
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Charrr
« Reply #29 on: March 11, 2008 11:09:29 AM »

Is this photo style screen printing? I'm using profilm/stemflex which I trace onto, cut away the paper layer with a craft knife and iron onto my screen.

I can't get massively detailed images this way, certainly nothing like some of the prints I've seen on here.

Is it possible to use the photographic method at home?
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Kd 101: How to Make Homemade Buttermilk Pancakes
Making Steak Seasoning at a Texas Ranch Steakhouse
How to Make Prosciutto Wrapped Game Hen
Easy Ways to Impress Your Holiday Dinner Guests
Roasted Chicken and Cauliflower Recipe
Latest Blog Articles
Tute Tuesday: Dark Chocolate Bacon Pecan Pie
Amazing Altered Puzzles
Meatless Monday: Cottage Cheese Mousse

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.