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Topic: How do you make a winter coat warm?  (Read 3397 times)
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gopoundsand
« on: November 11, 2009 08:05:19 AM »

I bought plaid wool from a local flea market and taffeta lining. I want it to be legitimately warm, but how do I do this? I've been told to sew polar fleece inside to line it, but will it be that warm? I saw this stuff that is used for quilting called warm and natural. Would this be okay to line a coat with?

Thanks!
Rebecca
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FriendlyJas
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2009 12:12:23 PM »

The quilt batting would need to be sewn in somehow. You have to sew on batting every so many inches or it will fall apart inside your garment when washed. Fleece would add some extra warmth. Wool is pretty warm, so if it is thick, it may be enough on its own. (My winter jacket is just wool with a regular lining fabric, but it doesn't get too very cold where I live.)
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soorawn
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2009 07:50:24 AM »

Didn't you say it is wool?  Real wool?  Then it IS already warm.  I don't quite understand the question.  Why would you want to put batting between the material and the lining?  Is it to achieve a snow jacket effect?  It would be a pity to do that to a beautiful plaid wool piece.
For the record, I made myself a coat with wool fabric last winter and it is, of course, very warm.  I lined it with silk.  I live in an area where it snows a little in winter.
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donniesgirl
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2009 04:03:17 PM »

I wouldn't use Warm & Natural - that is quilt batting & it'd be pretty bulky.  I'm one of those people who's always cold in the winter, so I can see how a wool coat wouldn't be that warm, especially depending on what climate you're in.  Taffeta is cool to the touch, so it'll tend to not feel warm.  Fleece would help warm it up.  If you want a coat that's super warm, like performance level snow coat, I would just buy one.
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gopoundsand
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2009 09:00:13 AM »

I live in Pennsylvania.. it gets pretty cold. Thanks for your help, I'm glad I didn't purchase batting without someone's input. haha that would suck to mess up.. although I'm sure I'll make a mistake somewhere along the way.. Thanks again!!
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donniesgirl
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2009 01:56:43 PM »

My DH lived in PA for five years & his winter coat is a trench coat lined with a removable wool lining.  Wool is warm. 
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I am collecting cotton Hawaiian fabric scraps for a quilt if you wanted to send any my way!
***
http://www.pinterest.com/donniesgirrl
Ashling
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2009 08:52:19 AM »

Wool is very warm, but sometimes not quite warm enough by itself.  I have a nice, long wool coat, but I get too cold wearing it below 30F.  And living in Chicago, it gets well below that.  Underlining it with fleece will add some warmth, but doesn't have to make it look like a puffy ski jacket. http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=285069.0 is a great example.
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nonesuch
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2009 04:22:18 PM »

There is a product called Thinsulate.  It is denser than batting, and made to hold its shape.  It could be used as an interlining.

Another option would be to make a button in or zip in lining of  tightly woven wool covered with lining fabric.  You'd want lining fabric against your clothing side so the coat slides on and off well.  Remember the buttons near the hem of the sleeves so the sleeves stay in place.
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pixidance
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2009 10:35:03 AM »

I live where it gets pretty cold in the winter and my wool coat is all I have.  It's pretty thick wool, though.
How about just sewing in a fleece lining instead of the taffeta?  If you do that, though, make sure your pattern is roomy enough.
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