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Topic: What kind of loom is this?  (Read 1600 times)
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Tailte
« on: March 29, 2011 11:31:15 PM »


I bought a second-hand loom the other day but I have no idea what kind of loom it is or how to use it.

The red and white things were evenly spaced but they got bunched up when travelling.



It also came with some sort of tapestry frame with a tapestry someone has made in it:

And some other bits and pieces:


I'd love it if someone can help me identify this so I can eventually use it.
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smallhold
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2011 03:41:50 AM »

There's something I've never seen before!
Ok, the red and white strings are heddles. I don't know how much you know about weaving so I'll just say what I see ok? The heddles are to create the gap where your weft goes through.  You see in the middle, between the two notches? That's where your warp goes through.
On top is a beam with notches on the right that is for your warp to be tied onto and turned up to have as long a fabric as you can make.
On the bottom there's a similar round beam to attach the other side of your long warp at.
And it's not clear but it looks as if the reed is at the bottom now? Could you take a pic of the bottom but that's standing in an angle?  It ought to be at waist height to have the warp through and slam that weft to make fabric.

In the 3rd pic you see op top a piece of wood with nails in right? That's to evenly space your warp threads and make sure you have equal threads for centimeter (or inch).  Translated from Dutch we calls it an equator.
The sticks with the notches at the ends are for the weft. To pull from left to right.

If you could take more detailed pics maybe I can tell you more. But it's an interesting loom for sure.
Don't know if you are in the USA or near here?  Here being Holland.
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Tailte
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2011 10:06:23 PM »

Thanks smallhold, I'll definitely take some more photos and post them. The loom isn't all that tall, though, the whole thing doesn't even come up to my waist. I don't know much about weaving at all, haha, except that it's results are pretty.  Tongue I'm in Australia, so quite a ways form Holland.
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Tailte
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2011 12:05:16 AM »

Ok, I took some more photos, I hope they're helpful.


This is the whole thing with bottom bit up, there are screws with things that you turn to change its position.
The loom is 24 inches tall and 28 3/4 inches wide, so it's not very big.
The top and bottom bars have a cog like this on each end:

They also have three small holes, like this:

And I found out that the bits with the red and white things can change position too:

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smallhold
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2011 12:53:24 AM »

Ok, I took some more photos, I hope they're helpful.


Right, fascinating. This seems to be a vertical loom. You start tying your warp (vertical threads) on the top. I say top cos later on the threads need to be stringed through the heddles. Easier from thread hanging down than from working them up.
When you attach the warp to the top, I recommend you are with two people. You will need to keep that warp as taut as possible to avoid problems later on. It's possible on your own but than you need something to weigh those threads down heavily.
Loads of tips to make life easier once you get to that stage.
http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/133862_31Mar11_loom5.jpg
The notches are to turn your woven fabric up further and keep the tension on. What is more interesting, is the shadow at the right of your in-build reed. It's the thing you bang against the fabric to make a nice even fabric. Horizontal thread goes in(weft), bang with the reed. And right now I have no real idea how that piece works.
If the reed only moves downwards it would mean you have the weft thread (horizontal one right) ABOVE the warp. Cos the majority of the warp is rolled up at the bottom, you weave a weft through above the reed and bang it to the top to make it tight. Only to make fabric and roll it to the upper pole with notches on.
If the reed moves also upwards, it can be the other way around.
Would it be possible to make a pic with you sitting in front of the loom and the red on your lap? Or someone the same height at least?


This is the whole thing with bottom bit up, there are screws with things that you turn to change its position.
The loom is 24 inches tall and 28 3/4 inches wide, so it's not very big.
The top and bottom bars have a cog like this on each end:
http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/133862_31Mar11_cog.jpg
They also have three small holes, like this:
http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/133862_31Mar11_loom3.jpg
No clue what the holes are for but we'll get there  Smiley
And I found out that the bits with the red and white things can change position too:
http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/133862_31Mar11_loom2.jpg

Ah very important. As you can see there are no handles or pedals to move the heddles. Together with the way the warp is guided through the heddles, the heddle movement makes the pattern of the fabric. As it looks now you can make a linen binding.  You know the way embroidery fabric looks? One up one down? That's the kind of fabric at least possible.
I've got loads of weaver's pattern books and once you get the hang of working this contraption, I can send you examples of how to make more complicated patterns with just a "one down one up".
http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/133862_31Mar11_loom4.jpg

The way the heddles (the red and white threads) are moved could make it a very nice loom. Definitely one to try.
If you could detail the reed, maybe we can figure out how the weft is to go.
I'm beginning to think maybe the reed (with the slits yeah?) might rest on your lap and you bang it upwards....
Hmm wait till further notice.

Nice find there girl.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2011 07:59:58 AM by kittykill - Reason: Quoted Image » THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Hi, my name is Smallhold and I compulsively collect looms."
"Hi Smallhold."
ShoelessJane
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2011 10:50:08 PM »

I think you may have it sitting on its face.  It's a pretty straight forward two-harness table loom.  I think.

Here's what I see: the back beam is up in the air, out of view in the first photo, and the warp beam would be just below it.

The red and white strings are, indeed, heddles, and the reed is below it (Not clear in any of the photos, but you can see the shadow of it in the photo of the ratchet.)  It looks like it may pivot back and forth to beat the weft, though that looks awkward.

It is resting on the breast beam, and the cloth beam is visible just above it.

The warp is wound it around the warp beam, over the back beam, through the heddles, through the reed, over the breast beam, and is tied onto the cloth beam (or, usually, tied onto a stick that is tied parallel to the cloth beam)

Weaving is done in the space between the reed and the breast beam. As you weave, you wind the cloth onto the cloth beam, and pull more warp forward from the warp beam.
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smallhold
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2011 01:00:47 AM »

Lol Jane, that's why I couldn't figure out where the reed went.
Of to buy new readingglases.
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"Hi, my name is Smallhold and I compulsively collect looms."
"Hi Smallhold."
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