A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: You can now organize your bookmarks into folders!  Read more here.
Total Members: 297,470
Currently Running With Scissors:
547 Guests and 33 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Tutorial: How to pattern foam costumes  (Read 28189 times)
Tags for this thread: tutorial  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
Ludi
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

May the Ghost Squid be with you
Online Online

Posts: 7704
Joined: 06-Jan-2008

Team Wordy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« on: October 19, 2009 05:24:18 PM »

A couple people have asked how to make costumes like this Blue Whale:

Below is a brief tutorial on how to pattern an object to turn it into a costume. I'll be posting several times in a row to post the whole tutorial, since I have to upload pictures. Usually I sculpt a model, but here I'm using a toy Allosaurus.  This toy is about 9 inches long which is about the minimum size for this method of patterning.  The larger the object, the more detail you'll get in the pattern.

Step 1:  Gather tools and supplies

For patterning:

toy or model
cellophane/clingwrap
wide masking tape
cutting board
rotary cutter
xacto knife
scissors
graph paper
clear tape
butcher paper or other large size paper
ruler/yardstick

For costume:

1/2 - 1 inch thick mattress foam (the green foam from Joann will work)
box cutter/utility knife
spray glue
polar fleece
upholstery or automotive thread
long needles



Step 2:  Decide how to fit costume on wearer

Here we're patterning a toy Allosaurus for a dinosaur costume to fit an adult.  We want to line up the dinosaur arms and legs more or less with the human arms and legs.  On the model, the shoulders and hips are about 2 inches apart.  On the wearer, the shoulders and hips are about 18 inches apart.  That means our scaled up dinosaur needs to be 9 times bigger than the model.  This will make the costume almost 7 feet long - an impressive size.  





« Last Edit: October 19, 2009 06:23:41 PM by Ludi » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Ludi
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

May the Ghost Squid be with you
Online Online

Posts: 7704
Joined: 06-Jan-2008

Team Wordy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2009 05:36:45 PM »

Step 3:  Cover model with cellophane.  Any kind of very thin plastic or clingwrap will work.  Just put one layer on, so as not to add bulk.  It serves as a separator between the model and the tape in the next step.



Step 4: Tape over cellophane on model. 

First cut narrow strips of masking tape on a cutting board, using rotary cutter.  You want narrow strips to conform to the shape of the model, about 1/4 inch wide.





Cover the model with the thin strips of masking tape, being careful to smooth it around the contours and not make wrinkles.



Model covered with tape.  I've not covered the arms and legs because we're using the human's own arms and legs in the costume:





THIS ROCKS   Logged

Ludi
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

May the Ghost Squid be with you
Online Online

Posts: 7704
Joined: 06-Jan-2008

Team Wordy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2009 06:02:11 PM »

Step 5: Marking the pattern on the taped model

First mark the center line all around the model.  We'll only pattern one side because the model is reasonably symmetrical. 



After marking the center line, mark a line to show the large parts of the object - in this case the head, body, and tail.



Then divide each part into smaller sections, drawing lines along the contour.  IMPORTANT NOTE:  at this point you must number each section and make hatch marks to show where they line up with each other.  You MUST take a photograph or draw a detailed map of the position of each part on the model, otherwise you will not be able to figure out how the parts go together once they're cut apart!

The more parts you make, the more detail you'll get, and a less boxy shape, but the more complicated it will be putting it together.









Step 6:  Cutting apart the pattern

Carefully cut along the lines of the pattern pieces with a very sharp knife.  Here's where you see you don't want to use a precious toy for a model, because it will likely get cut during this step.





We forgot to number a couple of parts!  But it wasn't too late to add the numbers and document their placement on the model:



All the small pattern pieces are cut apart and taped down on graph paper.  if you tape them down in logical relation to each other, they'll make more sense later on:



The pattern on graph paper:







THIS ROCKS   Logged

Ludi
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

May the Ghost Squid be with you
Online Online

Posts: 7704
Joined: 06-Jan-2008

Team Wordy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2009 06:10:09 PM »

Step 7 : Enlarging the pattern.

 Most people who make things are familiar with the process of "gridding up" to enlarge patterns.  You can do it the old fashioned way, or you can take the pattern to your local Kinko's and ask them to "enlarge this 900%" (or whatever your factor is). 

Tomorrow I'll try to post about cutting out the foam and assembling the costumes.  Unfortunately I don't have time to make a life-size example, so there probably won't be many, or any, photos.

Hope this tutorial is helpful!   Smiley


THIS ROCKS   Logged

KarenLouiseM
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 1153
Joined: 21-Oct-2006

Put me in coach, I'm ready to play


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2009 07:03:31 PM »

That is incredibly impressive!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

It's not that I don't want to swap, it's that I often don't have time.  But feel free to ask (especially if it's one that's not too time consuming).
edelC
Tutorial Contributor

Offline Offline

Posts: 4454
Joined: 20-Jun-2006

find love everywhere


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2009 05:48:23 AM »

this is an excellent tutorial, well done
THIS ROCKS   Logged

dntysgrplm
Make Things With Stuff
Offline Offline

Posts: 274
Joined: 30-Sep-2004


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2009 07:14:35 AM »

Amazing!  Thank you so much.  Now I have to make one!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Ludi
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

May the Ghost Squid be with you
Online Online

Posts: 7704
Joined: 06-Jan-2008

Team Wordy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2009 09:48:22 AM »

Thanks!  I hope this will encourage folks to try this advanced technique.

Later today I will show how to cut out and glue the foam pieces together.  I didn't think I'd be able to, but it looks like we might have the materials lying around for me to make a scaled-up dinosaur head from this pattern  (it will be 4 times bigger than the model, not 9 times as in the above discussion).  So more photos and info to come later.....  Smiley

Special thanks to my husband, a professional foam sculptor, who is taking most of the photos and providing some of the hand modeling, as well as expert guidance. 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Ludi
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

May the Ghost Squid be with you
Online Online

Posts: 7704
Joined: 06-Jan-2008

Team Wordy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2009 10:01:44 AM »

You can also make mascot-style heads and body shapes using this technique, like this Zebra we made for a client:


THIS ROCKS   Logged

edelC
Tutorial Contributor

Offline Offline

Posts: 4454
Joined: 20-Jun-2006

find love everywhere


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2009 12:45:15 PM »

oh wow. I want your job!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Use a Flat Iron For Perfectly Straight Hair
Celebrity Inspired Wedding Hairstyles
7 Hairstyle Toppers For Your Wedding
6 Sizzling Wedding Hair Accessories
9 Knockout Wedding Hairstyles
Latest Blog Articles
Winner of Craft Challenge #102-MissingWillow
September 17, 2014 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Sandwich Wrap

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.