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Topic: Tutorial: How to pattern foam costumes  (Read 28265 times)
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Ludi
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« on: October 19, 2009 05:24:18 PM »

A couple people have asked how to make costumes like this Blue Whale:

Below is a brief tutorial on how to pattern an object to turn it into a costume. I'll be posting several times in a row to post the whole tutorial, since I have to upload pictures. Usually I sculpt a model, but here I'm using a toy Allosaurus.  This toy is about 9 inches long which is about the minimum size for this method of patterning.  The larger the object, the more detail you'll get in the pattern.

Step 1:  Gather tools and supplies

For patterning:

toy or model
cellophane/clingwrap
wide masking tape
cutting board
rotary cutter
xacto knife
scissors
graph paper
clear tape
butcher paper or other large size paper
ruler/yardstick

For costume:

1/2 - 1 inch thick mattress foam (the green foam from Joann will work)
box cutter/utility knife
spray glue
polar fleece
upholstery or automotive thread
long needles



Step 2:  Decide how to fit costume on wearer

Here we're patterning a toy Allosaurus for a dinosaur costume to fit an adult.  We want to line up the dinosaur arms and legs more or less with the human arms and legs.  On the model, the shoulders and hips are about 2 inches apart.  On the wearer, the shoulders and hips are about 18 inches apart.  That means our scaled up dinosaur needs to be 9 times bigger than the model.  This will make the costume almost 7 feet long - an impressive size.  





« Last Edit: October 19, 2009 06:23:41 PM by Ludi » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2009 05:36:45 PM »

Step 3:  Cover model with cellophane.  Any kind of very thin plastic or clingwrap will work.  Just put one layer on, so as not to add bulk.  It serves as a separator between the model and the tape in the next step.



Step 4: Tape over cellophane on model. 

First cut narrow strips of masking tape on a cutting board, using rotary cutter.  You want narrow strips to conform to the shape of the model, about 1/4 inch wide.





Cover the model with the thin strips of masking tape, being careful to smooth it around the contours and not make wrinkles.



Model covered with tape.  I've not covered the arms and legs because we're using the human's own arms and legs in the costume:





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« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2009 06:02:11 PM »

Step 5: Marking the pattern on the taped model

First mark the center line all around the model.  We'll only pattern one side because the model is reasonably symmetrical. 



After marking the center line, mark a line to show the large parts of the object - in this case the head, body, and tail.



Then divide each part into smaller sections, drawing lines along the contour.  IMPORTANT NOTE:  at this point you must number each section and make hatch marks to show where they line up with each other.  You MUST take a photograph or draw a detailed map of the position of each part on the model, otherwise you will not be able to figure out how the parts go together once they're cut apart!

The more parts you make, the more detail you'll get, and a less boxy shape, but the more complicated it will be putting it together.









Step 6:  Cutting apart the pattern

Carefully cut along the lines of the pattern pieces with a very sharp knife.  Here's where you see you don't want to use a precious toy for a model, because it will likely get cut during this step.





We forgot to number a couple of parts!  But it wasn't too late to add the numbers and document their placement on the model:



All the small pattern pieces are cut apart and taped down on graph paper.  if you tape them down in logical relation to each other, they'll make more sense later on:



The pattern on graph paper:







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« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2009 06:10:09 PM »

Step 7 : Enlarging the pattern.

 Most people who make things are familiar with the process of "gridding up" to enlarge patterns.  You can do it the old fashioned way, or you can take the pattern to your local Kinko's and ask them to "enlarge this 900%" (or whatever your factor is). 

Tomorrow I'll try to post about cutting out the foam and assembling the costumes.  Unfortunately I don't have time to make a life-size example, so there probably won't be many, or any, photos.

Hope this tutorial is helpful!   Smiley


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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2009 07:03:31 PM »

That is incredibly impressive!
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« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2009 05:48:23 AM »

this is an excellent tutorial, well done
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« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2009 07:14:35 AM »

Amazing!  Thank you so much.  Now I have to make one!
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« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2009 09:48:22 AM »

Thanks!  I hope this will encourage folks to try this advanced technique.

Later today I will show how to cut out and glue the foam pieces together.  I didn't think I'd be able to, but it looks like we might have the materials lying around for me to make a scaled-up dinosaur head from this pattern  (it will be 4 times bigger than the model, not 9 times as in the above discussion).  So more photos and info to come later.....  Smiley

Special thanks to my husband, a professional foam sculptor, who is taking most of the photos and providing some of the hand modeling, as well as expert guidance. 
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« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2009 10:01:44 AM »

You can also make mascot-style heads and body shapes using this technique, like this Zebra we made for a client:


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« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2009 12:45:15 PM »

oh wow. I want your job!
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cute_anarchy
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2009 01:33:12 PM »

These are awesome!  I can't wait to see the rest of the steps - you must have the most impressive Halloween costumes every year!
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« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2009 04:02:08 PM »

We never make costumes for ourselves* - we live in the country and there's nowhere to wear them.  Huh  But we do think of ideas - our favorite so far is human-sized Punch and Judy hand-puppet costumes.  I still think it would be a fun thing to make!


*However, I often wear the costumes we make for our clients during photography sessions, so I get to enjoy them that way - or suffer, if it's hot!   Tongue
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« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2009 04:25:55 PM »

Step 8:  Marking the foam pieces

Cut out your enlarged pattern pieces, and trace them on the mattress foam.  Here I'm using 1/4 inch foam because this head is so small.  Trace the pieces and transfer numbers and alignment marks, then flip them and trace the mirror image (other side). Make sure you number and mark the other side too.  You can trace and mark each side with 2 different colors to keep track of which pieces are for which side.



Step 9:  Cutting the pieces

Because I used only one color of pen to mark the pieces, I'm only cutting out one side of the head at a time.  Use a very sharp xacto or other knife.



How you make the cut into the foam can help you shape the piece.  If you cut on a bevel, the pieces will either make an edge (convex) shape, or a valley (concave) shape.  A straight down cut will make a smooth curve or a flat shape, depending on the shape of the pattern piece.  You should make some test pieces to see how you might want to cut out your pattern pieces with a bevel.  This is hard to describe, so you'll just have to play with it to see how it works.

Bevel cuts:



Concave shape or valley:



Convex shape or edge:



In this example I cut a bit of a bevel on the edge of the lower jaw (pieces 9 and 10) and the eyebrow (piece 5) to make a sharper edge along those contours.




Step 10:  Gluing the pieces

Using the glue you prefer (we use spray glue or a paint-on glue called Fastbond), glue the pieces together, carefully matching the edges and alignment marks.  Refer to the photographs or maps you made earlier to make sure the pieces are going together properly.




I glued one half of the head together:



Then I cut out and glued the other half:



Then glued both halves together.  There you go, a rudimentary dinosaur head!





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« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2009 04:30:07 PM »

When I next have some time I'll show how to cover the head with fleece and detail it with quilting, plus teeth, eyes, etc.


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« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2009 07:53:31 PM »

that looks awesome!  thank you so much for posting this.
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« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2009 08:41:26 PM »

This is so cool!! I'm so excited to try this for a costume next year!
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« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2009 10:23:24 PM »

A girl at my college used this technique to make horses heads, they were incredible! As is your dinosaur! I would looooove to use this one day!
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« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2009 09:54:09 AM »

Please let me know, anyone, if you have questions about any of these steps.  Smiley


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RedMenace
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2009 09:10:55 PM »

This is a totally awesome tutorial, thanks so much for sharing! Can't wait to see Mr. Dino finished Cheesy

Are there any glues that you've tried that you would recommend against using? Like, if they make the finished product unnecessarily stiff or they eat away at the foam or they just plain don't get one piece to stick to the other?
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« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2009 06:05:12 AM »

I would avoid hot glue, and elmer's glue.   Avoid any kind of glue that doesn't stick right away or that takes a long time to dry.  Don't use Super Glue.

What you want is some kind of contact cement.   If you use spray glue but don't want to try to spray it along a thin edge, you can spray it in a cup and paint it on.  Personally I prefer paint-on contact cement to spray glue.
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desm88
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2009 06:33:23 AM »

this is a fantastic tutorial! thanks so much for sharing, Ludi Smiley
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« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2009 05:49:16 PM »

Thanks for all the nice comments!


I added upper and lower palettes of foam to the head to help define the shape of the muzzle and provide a mouth interior.



Covering with fleece:

I used polar fleece fabric to cover the Blue Whale.  You can also use faux fur, or any other fabric you want.  I prefer fleece because it is so pleasant to handle, and makes relatively invisible seams.  The Zebra is "plush" short pile synthetic faux fur, which is also pleasant to use.

We learned on the Blue Whale that sometimes the "facets" of the foam shapes show through as hard lines under the fleece, so to avoid this and make a smoother shape, cover the costume first with a layer of poly batting.  I didn't have time to do it on the Whale, so he's a little lumpy. Sad  If you're making a small shape and/or you can tell the facets won't show through, you might not have to do this.

I used the palette patterns to cut shapes from pink fleece for the mouth interior, and sewed them to the foam with matching thread.    For a costume in which the wearer sees through the mouth, you need to make sure there's enough of an opening at the back of the mouth to see through, and cover it with dark netting so the wearer isn't visible.



Sometimes it's better to finish the mouth interior last, so you can get inside the head easily.

Then drape the costume with fleece, and pin it in place.  You can make a muslin pattern if you want, but I find it easier and faster to drape directly on the object, cutting and fitting the fabric on the shapes.  This can be wasteful of fleece, though.  I try to conceal seams in anatomical features, if possible.  Don't pull the fleece too tight around the shapes because it can distort the foam, just smooth it over the contours.

I leave extra around the mouth to fit around the lips.




Carefully pin down and trim. You'll get the smoothest seam if you trim the fabric so the edges just meet.




Sew seams using small even stitches.  I use automotive upholstery thread for most costume projects.  I'm using regular thread for this little guy.




Depending on how fussy you are, you can get the seam to almost disappear by teasing the fibers with a pin.





Here's the head with the basic covering.  I made a tongue from fleece also:




More in the next day or two about detailing.





« Last Edit: October 27, 2009 05:51:04 PM by Ludi » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #22 on: October 28, 2009 06:31:18 PM »

I sewed some eyelids and nostrils on the little guy, using crescent-shapes cut from fleece.  For a larger sculpture you might need to make foam shapes to cover.  For a larger creature I would definitely turn the edge of the eyelid so the cut edge doesn't show.  These are glass taxidermy eyes. You can make eyes from any spheres or half-spheres - on the Whale we used plastic half-spheres used for home-made Christmas ornaments, I think.  Ping pong balls are a fine traditional choice for creature eyes.



You can add skin texture and wrinkles by quilting the fleece down to the foam.  Here I've added a few spots using applique.  You can also paint the fleece with an airbrush, but I prefer the look of the clean fleece.  You can spend the rest of your life adding details with quilting and whatnot.  I've decided to just do this little bit to give an idea of a couple techniques.  He's going to be toothless after all!



Ok, next Halloween I expect to see a lot of fabulous foam-sculpted costumes posted by you all!   Grin
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« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2009 07:59:50 PM »

Thank you so much for the fantastic tutorial... I can't wait to try this out! Cheesy
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« Reply #24 on: November 23, 2009 12:21:03 PM »

Awesome tutorial!
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« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2009 10:26:34 AM »

Looking forward to seeing your projects!  Cheesy
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librarylolita
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2010 07:10:36 AM »

Thank you for the awesome tutorial.

Do you think it would be possible to smooth the "facets" out by shaving them down with an electric turkey cutter?  That's what they used at Joanns to cut a panel of foam for me.

I love the quilted details on the underside of the whale.  Is it being held up with any kind of harness?
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« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2010 05:37:20 PM »

The whale had an aluminum armature inside with pieces that rested on the wearer's shoulders like a backpack.

Re: carving the facets with a turkey cutter - I think there might be problems because of the adhesive holding the pieces together - it would likely gum up the knife.  Maybe worth doing a test though.  Smiley
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librarylolita
« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2010 10:32:18 AM »

Re: carving the facets with a turkey cutter - I think there might be problems because of the adhesive holding the pieces together - it would likely gum up the knife.  Maybe worth doing a test though.  Smiley

Well, if I can get a hold of a turkey cutter, I'll do a test run.  Thanks again for the tutorial!!
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« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2010 09:13:30 AM »

Thank you SO much for shareing, this is fascinating. I'm going to have to have a try now  Cheesy
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« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2010 12:56:46 PM »

You're welcome!   Cheesy
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« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2010 05:05:20 PM »

That is so cool! I really want to try now.
Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin
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« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2011 06:44:45 PM »

bumping this for Halloween!
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« Reply #33 on: November 01, 2011 03:02:23 PM »

Thank you so much!  This is going on my inspiration board!
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« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2011 10:25:23 AM »

Still totally awesome!
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« Reply #35 on: November 08, 2011 12:47:12 PM »

This is really awesome! Now I'll be looking for reasons to try making something like this.  Grin
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« Reply #36 on: November 08, 2011 06:04:05 PM »

Thank you!  Looking forward to your projects!   Smiley
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« Reply #37 on: November 27, 2011 02:13:23 PM »

This is awesome. I don't understand how you fit the costumes on the wearer, and how does the wearer see?
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« Reply #38 on: November 27, 2011 03:26:40 PM »

You 'll need to put a zipper in somewhere so the person can get in, and usually the wearer sees through the mouth or sometimes you have to put a hole somewhere which can sometimes be hidden with netting.  Obviously there's a lot more to making costumes than just the foam patterning part!  Smiley

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« Reply #39 on: December 07, 2011 10:56:14 AM »

OMG how did I miss this? Oh man, if I get started now maybe I can have something finished by next Halloween. LOL!
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« Reply #40 on: December 07, 2011 01:03:56 PM »

You better!   Cheesy
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« Reply #41 on: February 24, 2012 01:15:37 PM »

I want to do this for plushie making.  How do you know where to add additional segments to the tape pattern?  Like, just on curves?
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« Reply #42 on: February 25, 2012 07:57:26 AM »

Yes, wherever a contour changes you should add a seam.  If there's a large curve, you might need to break it up into several sections in order to keep it from flattening out.  The minimum number of sections for a large curved shape like a head or torso is 5 if you don't want it to look "faceted." The more detail you want, the more sections.    Smiley
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« Reply #43 on: February 25, 2012 11:49:06 AM »

Thanks!
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« Reply #44 on: April 27, 2012 02:25:13 AM »

You have just absolutely blown my mind. This is so simple...but so brilliant. Thank you so much!
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« Reply #45 on: April 29, 2012 05:51:37 PM »

You're welcome!  Smiley
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