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Topic: sewing machine cabinets - advice  (Read 709 times)
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dilettante
« on: October 18, 2009 03:44:06 PM »

So I've been coveting a sewing machine cabinet for a couple of reasons. They're expensive, but I find affordable used ones at a local thrift store and on craigslist pretty regularly. However, I don't know what I'm doing!

Does anyone have any advice on:

- choosing a cabinet (I'll probably have to evict a nice antique machine, will try to get a non-working machine in it to reduce the guilt)

- installing the machine? I wrote to my machine's manufacturer (Singer) to make sure it can be installed in a cabinet, and they said I'll have to buy a couple of little parts. The manual didn't have anything about this.

- operating the lift?

Many thanks!
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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2009 04:43:25 AM »

Keep in mind that most of the vintage cabinets are designed to hold flat bed sewing machines with hinge pin holes in the rear of the bed. Modification and fabrication will be required to get a newer, free arm machine to occupy the space that the vintage machine was in.  It also won't fold down with the free arm machine.

Here is what most vintage cabinets will look like with the machine removed:



Unless you plan on figuring out and executing something to hold you machine in the hole, I suggest that you look for a free-arm cabinet and contact a dealer for guidance as far as adapters, parts and fitment.

 
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dilettante
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2009 01:56:40 PM »

My machine isn't a free-arm machine, as far as I can tell, but the email I had from Singer did say it would need a free-arm cabinet. The cabinet I had my eye on currently has a Singer Touch and Sew 638 in it, but I can't find out whether that's free arm or not. I'd guess not.

I'm piecing things together from your answer and answers I had elsewhere, so there are some things I now realize are relevant that I didn't at the time I asked the original question.

Thanks!
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« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2009 05:54:01 PM »

What model is your machine? 

Here is a Singer 638 Touch & Sew:


http://www.tias.com/8128/PictPage/1922921258.html

It's a FLAT BED machine.  Meaning there isn't a part that comes off of the bed to reveal an "arm"- hence the term free-arm. Below is a drawing of what an example of a free-arm type machine.  It has a bed extension that is removable.  With the extension removed, you can access a cylinder type sewing arm.

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dilettante
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2009 06:02:17 PM »

Thanks, that's the clearest image of the 638 I had seen. They were making free-arm machines by that time, so I had been hopeful. On looking back a little after I had replied, I found my machine is a free-arm machine (the seam for a little container is the same as the seam for the arm). It's a Singer Precision 7444. It does have holes in the rear of the bed.

Damn, I like the older cabinets much, much more. Guess I'll keep it on the little tray table it has now.
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dilettante
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2009 03:20:13 PM »

So if I find an empty cabinet in a thrift store, how can I tell if it's a free-arm cabinet?
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« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2009 09:43:54 AM »

It will have some manner of sturdy platform for the machine to bolt onto.

Go to your local sewing machine shop and look at cabinets that will fit your machine and have the features you want.  That's the easiest way for you to learn what it looks like- see one in person first. 
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