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Topic: Interfacing on purse.  (Read 750 times)
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ikissedmadonna
« on: April 18, 2005 01:55:16 PM »

  Hello, Im currently using simpllicitys 5151 pattern. Its a purse. On the list of materials, it says this:

Fabrics: 45" wide with or without nap such as : Broacloth, Calico, Chambray, Lightweight Denim, Tiole.

B Bag (the one I am trying to make) : 1 5/8 yd
Interfacing - 1 5/8 yd of 22' to 25' wide medium weight fusable

Alright, I have a few questions.

To make the bag, I bought plenty of two fabrics : A plain, patterned cotton one, and a quilted 2 ply.

What in the world is interfacing? and is the fabric I bought interfacing-able-ish?

And, fusable. Are my fabrics fusable? I mean, can I fuse them by stitching in place a bunch of times?

Im really confused. On my pattern it says cut 4 of fabric, and 2 of interfacing. Which is wich? and will I have a lining? I am planninng on using both fabrics. As the outside fabric, and a lining. Raw, this is too sscary.

Thanks  Kiss Sorry for my confusing-ish state of mind.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2005 02:03:34 PM by ikissedmadonna » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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junquette
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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2005 03:42:46 PM »

hi interfacing is used to stiffen a fabric to make the finishied peice look a little crisper so to speak. It will be used in your collars or cuffs on a shirt for example.  Fusible means iron on interfacing. You use you iron to fuse it onto the wrong side of your fabric. So many people screw up with interfacing and end up melting it to thier iron.
Look at it close and you will see that there is a texture to it. Rub your fingers over it and you will feel the difference between your textured side and the right side.  Then you lay the textured side on the fabric.

Your pattern says cut four of fabric and two of interfacing.  They are infering you will use the same fabric for the outside and the lining.  But you said you have a two ply quilted fabric so this will be strong enough for your
bag. YOu won't need the interfacing if you use this and your other fabric.

But to answer another question your plain patterned cotton could be interfaced if you want to but you won't need it if using the quilted fabric. With this fabirc you wouldn't probably notice the interfacing anyway.
But if your cotton is going to be the outside  of your purse then you could use your interfacing. But with the quilted fabric I wouldn't worry about it. I think your two fabrics together would be enough for strength and durability.

DOes this help?
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ikissedmadonna
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2005 03:48:15 PM »

Yes...thank you soooo much!!! But one more question, what do i cut? I want to use the quilt-ish fabric for my lining, and cotton for outside. Do i cut 2 quilt, and 4 cotton? Is the fabric I have to cut to "interface" like lining?
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ikissedmadonna
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2005 03:50:20 PM »

Wiat, another question popped up. You said that they were assuming that my cotton would be for both the lining and outside. How do I make the quilt my lining? So I just go about acting like my interfacing is my quilt. Like, when it says "PIN INTERFACING TO FABRIC" do I "PIN QUILT TO FABRIC" Raw, sorry, im really confused. Thank god your helping.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2005 03:53:06 PM by ikissedmadonna » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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junquette
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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2005 04:14:48 PM »

I checked the pattern on the internet and it looks like either of the bags are two pieces. Just a front and a back. So you will cut two of your fabric and two of your quilted fabric. You won't cut four of your fabric. But you don't have to cut two of interfacing. Skip that part I'm sure your fabric will be firm enough.
 So instead-yes- you will pin your quilt fabric to your fabric. Then when they say to turn it right side out you won't have to worry about the interfacing. So once you get the two layers together you just finish by following the rest of the instructions.
DOes this make sense for you?
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ikissedmadonna
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2005 04:49:08 PM »

Ohhhh thank you sooo much. You could not imagine how confused I was. Well, actually, my kibber jabber may have convinced you. Thanks for your patience.
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