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Topic: Let's Play "What's Under This Hideous Tile?" (Updated!)  (Read 3858 times)
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crazy_bc_jen
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2009 09:36:49 PM »

Assuming you are talking about smaller sanders hurting your hand, you can rent giant sanders designed specifically for refinishing hardwood floors.  They get the job done pretty quickly.
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« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2009 07:55:51 AM »

Seems like a waste of money to rent a giant sander for a six foot by two foot space.  I wonder if there's anything in between.
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twodustyboots
« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2009 09:15:43 AM »



Well, the only other options you have are hand sanding or chemical strippers.  With chemical strippers, the job goes fast, but you have to let everything settle out before you can finish.  And you still have to do some sanding, especially between coats of finish.

If you are renting and do not intend to stay, then you can strip and sand.  Then just a couple light coats of finish, followed by wax.  Not too much work involved there.
I just saw an example of chemical stripping on the DIY network online. It looks so simple but I can barely stand the smell of scented shampoos so I think I would have to find someone to do it for me. Hmm, guess it's time to flirt with my single neighbors Grin just kidding (sort of!) What I'd like to do is use something non-toxic to strip up the glue and goo (if that sort of thing exists) then sand, stain, and seal. And do it cheaply.
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« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2009 02:00:10 PM »

I don't know of any chemical stripper that doesn't have a ghastly smell.  I can't use them, myself for that reason.  You might want to look at the Formby's formula.  It's probably the least toxic that I know of.  If the finish isn't too heavy, you might try using rubbing alcohol, just to rough it up a bit, then sand with a 200 grit sandpaper, followed by a 400 grit paper.  That should get you close enough to put on a decent glossover finish.  It's not perfect, but it will get you there.
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kaishabackwards
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« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2009 10:11:02 PM »

Oh good luck!  I hope you post pictures when it's done!
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TheMistressT
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« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2009 06:25:36 PM »

If you sand that door, be sure to use at least a dust mask... if the house is old there is likely some lead paint on there somewhere. Make sure to clean up as much of the dust and larger particles as you can so you don't transfer it with your feet and animals and kids don't ingest it.  If the paint is bubbling a lot you may be able to remove a lot of it with a basic scraper which is hard work, but doesn't vibrate like a sander and takes off larger chunks of paint that's easier to pick up and harder to breathe in.

There is an orange-scented stripper that doesn't smell good, per se, but does smell like really strong orange-like stuff. Again a respirator will come in handy and eliminate the scent while you wear it. 
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RuneAriala
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2009 07:23:17 AM »

Bona makes a non-toxic variety of refinisher/top coat, so that might be worth looking in to.  I know they sell it at Ace Hardware, and possibly also Lowe's (not sure what's available in your area).  I've never sniffed it, so really not sure if it might still have some smell to it.   We also got a cheap hand rotary sander at Harbor Freight for something like $30, which we have been using to sand down the subfloor while putting in our hardwoods (alas, nothing was under our carpet except OSB!  Cry ).  That might work pretty well, assuming they sell a really fine, fine grit sandpaper.  I would also watch Craigslist in your area, you might be able to pick up one pretty cheap if you don't have a Harbor Freight.
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twodustyboots
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2009 09:55:34 AM »

Well, for now the project is stalled. I recently informed my landlord of the wonderful find (of hardwood floors throughout the building) and while he thinks that is great, he is completely uninterested in putting any money or work into it.   I am probably not going to do anything until spring, because it is already fall here and VERY cold, and is only going to get colder. There is no heat on the landing. Darn!
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TheMistressT
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« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2009 11:25:07 AM »

It's so interesting to do a little domestic archeology, isn't it?  If you do decide to tear that out down to the wood (is it hardwood or softwood, it's unusual for hardwood to be in bathrooms) be careful with the old linoleum tiles - asbestos is not an uncommon ingredient in them and unless you can get them up w/o breaking the tiles you'll likely liberate the asbestos if it's in there.
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twodustyboots
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2009 11:37:59 AM »

It's so interesting to do a little domestic archeology, isn't it?  If you do decide to tear that out down to the wood (is it hardwood or softwood, it's unusual for hardwood to be in bathrooms) be careful with the old linoleum tiles - asbestos is not an uncommon ingredient in them and unless you can get them up w/o breaking the tiles you'll likely liberate the asbestos if it's in there.

"domestic archeology" - I love that! A perfect description.  It is hardwood in the bathroom (I was able to see large pieces of it in the closet) and I'm pretty sure it hasn't always been a bathroom, as the apartment I live in is merely the top floor of a small old house.  But now I'm a little freaked because I didn't use any mask when I pulled up the tiles on the landing.  Yikes- I had no idea about the asbestos. I looked it up on Wikipedia and it is astonishing how many places asbestos can be (and how many building materials it can be in.) Good to know.
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