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Topic: I think trhis is a 60's Kenmore machine, One of the generics mfg in Japan  (Read 3063 times)
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markywmurray
« on: August 21, 2009 09:28:19 AM »

 We recently purchased this machine and have been unable to locate any information on it. There is a yellow paint stamp on the inside base that appears to spell out KENMORE with the following next to it, possibly a model #? SW132 or SW 332(very faded)
The machine was cleaned and lubricated by my husband and operates very smoothly but, it has a trap door for cams on the top however we do not know what type or where to find them. the machine weighs about 30 pounds and I would like to set it up alongside my rocketeer so I don't have to swap machines during sewing sessions. If the machine images do not come through, they are in my Craftster member gallery in my name, markywmurray. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks, Marky









« Last Edit: August 21, 2009 10:30:08 AM by sweets4ever » THIS ROCKS   Logged
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« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2009 11:19:25 AM »

http://sewing-machines.blogspot.com/2006/05/japanese-clones-of-40s-50s-and-60s.html

Yes, it looks as if you are right: according to that guy's blog though there are literally thousands of different clones that were produced in  post war Japan for export.  The upside is that these were mostly really well made.  I hope you get it running right and remember to check and probably service any wiring that has been in the cabinet: I bought one similar from a thrift store and the machine itself was pristine, but where the wiring went through the wooden cabinet it was terribly worn and damaged (chewed through!) and needed professional service. 

My mom has an early 70's kenmore that she has been using regularly for almost 40 years, has never had it serviced, because she babys it with very regular and thorough maintenance- it runs better than my Brother 600i and sews through leather like butter.  So it may be a pretty good investment for a reliable machine you have there.
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markywmurray
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2009 11:28:59 AM »

We thought so too, but could not find the exact machine.  Many close to it, but not quite the same.  That would be fine, but really would like a users manual and know what attatchments to use.  My hubby bought some cams he thought would work, but they did not work...have to figure out how to resell them on e-bay!!

Thank you so much for the help...will look at the site you sent!!

marky

P.S.  My hubby can do electric, so no problems there!!
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« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2009 01:27:28 PM »

Identify the Type of Feet for Your Sewing Machine
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Jenny
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markywmurray
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2009 04:08:37 PM »

It has a straight long shank foot.  Only one foot came with it a zig zag..all purpose foot.  Does that help, or were you just sending general information to the group??

Thanks for the help!!   Cool
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markywmurray
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2009 05:47:34 PM »

Any idea how I would tell which attachments and cams this machine would use??

Thanks!!
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candacerae
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2009 10:34:59 PM »

You need to go to University of Oklahoma'sDept. Of theatre website and get in touch with their costuming Dept.  These machines are what they use in their costume shop if i am not mistaken...it has been 10 years but i remember that wonderful machine very well.  Coopie Mason was the shop head when I was there.
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markywmurray
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2009 11:24:00 PM »

Thank You.  I sent her a brief message and a couple of photos.  I hope she will take the time to respond.

marky
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« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2009 04:18:30 AM »

Any idea how I would tell which attachments and cams this machine would use??

Thanks!!

The class 15, side loading Japaneese zigzag machines of that era (such as the one pictured in this thread) either used a low shank or high shank foot.  This page tells you how to determine which one your particular machine uses. that is why I provided the link in my earlier post.

Also, having a left needle position (rather than center) is also not uncommon on these side loading machines.  For certain feet and attachments, you need to make certain that you get the type appropriate for the needle position of your machine. (buttonhollers, rufflers and stratigh stitch feet would be an example).

ETA- the machine shown in this thread isn't a Kenmore, but it is possible that is was made in a factory that made machines with a variety of labels or badges on them.  You can look for a "JA-___" or  "JC-___" number stamped on the underside.  Sometimes it can be determined which factory it came from with that number.  If it were a Kenmore machine, it would have a metal plate that said Sears Robuck and a model number.  The first three digits of the model number would be Sear's source code.   For the Japaneese made Kenmores, the code will either be 148 for the Soryu company or 158 for Maruzen/Jaguar.

Cams for this machine will be a trial and error project.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2009 04:27:04 AM by Sew-Classic » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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markywmurray
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2009 12:47:24 PM »

Yes it has a long shank.  I measured after your first post.  I am not sure if the post I wrote that gave the following information got to this group or not.  I had so much trouble getting the pics in!!  Technotard...a definition of my computer abilities...but I am learning!

The reason we thought it was a Kenmore is because on the front lip it is stamped in yellow paint "Kenmore #SW 3_2...not sure what the middle number is maybe another 2.  Beside that the ingraved # is JZ 51426  Under the machine molded into the metal is a large GNS.  Other than that there is a decal that says City of Los Angeles Building and Safety Department. Nothing else that might hint at her place of manufacture.

There are two screws that were obviously meant to hold a brand plate of some kind on the front to the left of the dials.  Hub. said they had never been used...screws are in place, but no sign that they had ever held anything in place.

The art deco type cabinet it came in has a stamp that says Sears Kenmore Model #5662025.

Sigh.  I purchased one set of cams that did not fit, I will try another...the ones I got were too large, so now at least I have a baseline!!

Perhaps this little machines origin will remain a mystery forever!! 

Thank you all for your help!!  marky
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