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Topic: Anthropologie Chicken Dishcloths?  (Read 1843 times)
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ImperiestroMary
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« on: April 10, 2005 08:41:08 PM »

My mom was exposed to Anthropologie for the first time a week or two ago, and loved it. Her favorite thing, by far, were these dishcloths, with little crocheted chickens on the bottom edge: http://www.anthropologie.com/jump.jsp?itemID=4204&itemType=PRODUCT&iSubCat=402&iMainCat=374 . Would it be feasible to make one (or two?) of these by mother's day? Does anyone have any insights as to how they were made (you can get a really good look at them by clicking on "Zoom/Additional Views" and zooming twice)? I'm really more of a knitter, but it seems like the shaping requires crochet.

Additionally, if this can happen, does anyone know the best place to get a plain dishcloth like that? This would really be the perfect gift. Thanks for any advice, craftsters!  Smiley
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Lothruin
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« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2005 10:26:11 PM »

They look easy enough.  They might be done with a black and white sock yarn. The bottoms are kinda strange, as they look like they have long loops instead of an actual stitch, but that could be done with triple crochets instead.  Here's what I'd say:

Start off with a chain 4 or so, join with a slip stitch, then chain 3.  Work maybe 16 triple crochets into the loop.  Join and chain one, then work 2 single crochets in each stitch.  When you get back to the beginning (you might want to use a marker) just work 1 sc in each stitch until you've got about 5 rows finished.  You should be able to tell if this is the right proportion.  Adjust as neccessary.  Make sure you end up where you started.  Work sc in 5 stitches, fold the body so that the first stitch is at one point, jump across and work in the stitch directly opposite, essentially cutting out 20 stitches.  Work in a couple rounds to form the neck and head.  On the last row of the head, work the first stitch as a sc, the second as a dc, the third as a tc, then another dc, then two sc, a dc, a tr, a dc and on last sc and join with a slip stitch, then tie off.  To finish, sew the little bump for a head together (you can probably stitch it closed with a quick row of sc, dc, sc, dc, sc in red floss to make the comb) and sew the back together flat.  (This'll make the tail.)  Of course, you should stuff it with something.  Maybe a wadded up bit of towel.  Something that won't come out through your bigger stitches in the bottom.  And then add eyes and a beak.
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mikan
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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2005 10:31:03 PM »

you can use a larger bird pattern and make it in size 20 crochet thread, or for even smaller, one strand seperated from 6-strand embroidery floss.  I can't get my computer to show the close up version Sad   try checking google or another search for chicken patterns in crochet.

I would make your own towels from a nice cotton, just cut rectangles and hem the edges with a sewing machine.  I've bought the plain ones from the store before and it is really hit and miss on the quality and they can be much more expensive than they need to. 
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2005 02:44:17 AM »

There is a knitted chicken pattern in "the World of Knitted Toys", that is pretty tiny already but could be made tinier by using crochet thread and tiny needles. The original pattern takes about 15 minutes for me (an average speed knitter). Check out the book and make sure you post when your finished; that towel is cute!
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ISBN=0715312243
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ImperiestroMary
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2005 04:25:33 PM »

Thanks to everyone for the good tips! Especially Lothruin; thanks a bunch for going through the trouble to write all that out! I whipped one up according to your instructions this afternoon, and it's adorable and looks just like the real thing! It will be a cinch to finish before mother's day. I'll have to look and see if I have any good material for the towel itself.
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Lothruin
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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2005 07:57:15 PM »

Ooh!  So glad it worked out right!! 

If you don't know what to make the towels out of, I might suggest just buying some pre-made "bar towels", which are also called "tea towels" by some.  They're basically just plain white cotton, pre-hemmed, so you don't have to worry about it.  They're what most people I know who do embroidered tea towels use.  I don't know the best place to get them, but they come in big packs usually.  I always get mine at Sam's, but of course, you'd have to have a membership.  There they come in packs of maybe 12 or 16 for a ridiculously small pricetag. 

Anyway, have you thought about whether you'll add a border as well?  The towels from anthropologie also seem to have that little semi-lacy border of white crochet.  That'd be easy to do as well.  I just got two books of crocheted and knitted edgings.  One's from 1946 and the other from 1952.  (I think those are the right years.  Anyway, they're old.)  I think I even know that one of them has instructions for an edging very much like that one. 

My mother's kitchen is all in roosters, and I think it would be fun to make her little hen towels.  Wouldn't this be cute:  Do most of the hens in the black and white, but do one red one on each towel, then embroider quotes from "The Little Red Hen".  Like, "Who will help me bake this flour into bread?" and "Then I will do it myself."
« Last Edit: April 11, 2005 08:01:02 PM by Lothruin » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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ImperiestroMary
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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2005 01:02:25 PM »

We happen to have a membership to Sam's-- I'll have to figure out what to do with 10-14 more of them though!

That border is what I've been thinking about. I wanted to make something like it, not only for aesthetics, but because it seems like the ideal chicken-hanging apparatus. I'll need to check out my local library for anything good; that border looks simple enough, doesn't it?

That's a cute idea, and it would be fun to make roosters too; you could just add a piece of fringe to the tail end, perpendicular to the back.
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