A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Need help? Click the HELP link at the top of the screen to read the docs or ask at the Help Desk.
Total Members: 297,038
Currently Running With Scissors:
470 Guests and 13 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Holy Smokes, Batman!!!  (Read 562 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
Cheyenneswthrt07
I cann't quiet the creative monkey in my head!
Offline Offline

Posts: 1224
Joined: 25-Nov-2007


View Profile WWW
« on: July 20, 2009 03:24:47 PM »

AAACCCKKKK.  The motor burned out on  my Gilda today  Cry My father rewired her but alas there was no saving that part of her.  I'd like to say that I'm sad about it but really I always knew she was ment to be human powered, she started out life that way as a treadle and she should be again.  I'm going to buy her a hand crank for now so that I can still utilize her awsomeness.  For now I"m going to rest my poor wrist, I was in the middle of a hem when the smoke started, and I hand spun the wheel to finish what I started off  Shocked
THIS ROCKS   Logged

PeanutPaterooski
Stitch B!@#$
Offline Offline

Posts: 172
Joined: 22-Jun-2009

To thine own self be true.


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009 01:39:39 AM »

she's a 99 right? if so, you might be able to find another 99 or motor for a 99 or 185 on craigslist. Where you at chica? I'll keep my eyes peeled for ya.

EDIT: Found : She's a 66. Anyway, a motor for a 99 or 185 should work. You can usually find them (older singers) on CL cheap or in thrifts. Send me a PM with your info. If I see one, I'll holla and let you know if I can snag it and send you the motor. Easy as pie to replace just the motor. Also call around to the repair shops. You might be able to get a deal.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009 01:42:09 AM by PeanutPaterooski » THIS ROCKS   Logged

If you wait to be happy to do happy things, you'll be waiting to be happy forever.
Fight corporation. DIYDS. Make and wear clothes
you made yourself with pride, and win against recession, and more! PM me for details.

Wanna trade some sewing notions/fabric for scrapbooking/stamps? PM me.
Sew-Classic
Sew-Classic.com
Offline Offline

Posts: 552
Joined: 03-Nov-2008

Sew-Classic.com


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009 05:09:29 AM »

A new, aftermarket motor can be purchased for under $20 to fit on any of the belt driven Singers with a motor boss under the hand wheel.

You may not be able to use the same electrical terminal (part that the light fixture and motor wires go to and the power cord and controller cord hook up to) that is currently on your machine with the new motor and it's bracket.  But, for about $30-$35 you can ge a new foot controller, terminal, foot controller and block and cord set as well as the new motor.  This would only leave you the task of wiring the ligth fixture into the new terminal. Just some options.

Often on the old Singer motors, people make the mistake of oiling the motor bearings when they rewire them or when they are cleaning and oiling the rest of the machine. Unlike most sewing machine motors, these Signer motors weren't meant to be oiled, but instead they have wicks inside of grease tubes at the bearing points. If oiled, the oil will run into the motor, coat the brushes and cause smoking and/or motor failure.

When I refurbish one of these types of motors, I clean the wicks and bearings, and repack the grease tubes with clean, fresh grease.  It also helps to clean any old oil , grease and carbon built up from the armature and to clean the brushes and brush tubes.   Once they've gone over this treatment, they are good to go for another 50 years or so! Grin  If you end up with a used motor off of a vintage Singer, you may want to consider giving it a similar workover.

Also, The motors on the three-quarter sized Singers such as the 99's are usually rated at about 0.5 amps, and the motors on the full sized Singers are rated at about 0.6 - 0.7 amps (they did vary a bit over the years).  You may prefer to stick with the motor from another full sized Singer if you are going the used route. When I've used new motors as replacements, I've gone with a 0.9 amp version.

If you want you can set it up as both a hand crank and an electric machine even if it has a solid wheel.
A Little Convertible for Summer - Singer 99 Hand Crank to Electric & Back Again!
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009 05:13:46 AM by Sew-Classic » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Jenny
Blog.Sew-Classic.com
Sew-Classic                                                                Sew-Classic  
Cheyenneswthrt07
I cann't quiet the creative monkey in my head!
Offline Offline

Posts: 1224
Joined: 25-Nov-2007


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009 07:26:05 AM »

I watched my dad as he put oil down the little holes in the motor........I wonder now.  I don't feel confident in my mechanical inclinations to tear it apart but I guess at this point what am I really going to hurt, broke is broke right lol. 

I shall look around to see what I find.  We have a sew dude here in town, where we got the belts from, he may have something in the motor dept or know someone.  His clerk scared me, I pointed to the old Featherweight sitting in the window and said I have a 1920's machine, not much different than that one and she shrugged and looked at me like I had 14 heads.  I guess with some people it has to be spanking new and have 1284757579332 stitches to be worth noting lol. 

Amazingly my Gilda has a spoked wheel, I don't have to replace that part of her if I wish to add on a hand crank. 


Peanut, I live in Nor Cal.  Thanks for your help.   Grin
THIS ROCKS   Logged

PeanutPaterooski
Stitch B!@#$
Offline Offline

Posts: 172
Joined: 22-Jun-2009

To thine own self be true.


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2009 11:57:03 AM »

you got it lady. i'll keep my eyes peeled here for a 66 or a motor for one and let ya know if i can grab one for ya.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

If you wait to be happy to do happy things, you'll be waiting to be happy forever.
Fight corporation. DIYDS. Make and wear clothes
you made yourself with pride, and win against recession, and more! PM me for details.

Wanna trade some sewing notions/fabric for scrapbooking/stamps? PM me.
Sew-Classic
Sew-Classic.com
Offline Offline

Posts: 552
Joined: 03-Nov-2008

Sew-Classic.com


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2009 05:13:48 AM »

I watched my dad as he put oil down the little holes in the motor........I wonder now. 

From over here, I can't say the extent of the damage to the motor, but it is possible that not all is lost.  Yes, excess oil can cause smoking and it can lead to severe damage, but sometimes a little clean up will make things right again.

If it were me, I'd open up the motor , remove and clean the brushes, and clean up any oil on the armature or coil.  Be sure to use electrical contact cleaner that is safe for plastic parts.  The other stuff will melt away protective coatings on the field coil and armature windings.  There's not much to loose at this point??
« Last Edit: July 22, 2009 05:26:03 PM by Sew-Classic » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Jenny
Blog.Sew-Classic.com
Sew-Classic                                                                Sew-Classic  
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Make Glittering Valentine Buckles
How to Make a Heart-Shaped Bag
Fringing a Cashmere Blanket
Assemble the Perfect Sewing Kit
How to Make Lavender Sachets
Latest Blog Articles
August 20, 2014 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Faux Cross Stitch Sweatshirt
More Great Crafts Using Cardboard Tubes

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.