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Topic: An amazing find at Goodwill  (Read 1989 times)
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Obsessed Knitter
« on: June 30, 2009 04:00:10 PM »

So I had an amazing find at Goodwill today. A gigantic bag packed to the brim with different amounts of lace trim. There are hundreds of different kinds, wide and thin, simple and complicated, and in a variety of different colors.



Look at all that lace! I've never used lace before, and am an advanced beginner sewer. I love skirts, so I was thinking of adding the lace to some skirts. Does anyone know of some good patterns that use lace? Is there anything special I need to consider?

It has a bit of a musty smell; very light and kind of like an antique shop. I'm assuming washing lace is okay? I mean, it would get washed anyways with the garment.
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Alexus1325
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2009 04:11:58 PM »

THATS INCREDIBLE!!!! Why of why does Value Village have to be so chintzy on how much goes into a baggy???

BTW, I wash trims by hand in the sink with warm water and hand soap Tongue

PS: send it all to me! LOL!
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Ludi
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2009 04:26:42 PM »

Here are links to some lacy inspiration:

http://gibbousfashions.com/shop.php?inv=3

http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5104063

http://www.firstview.com/collection.php?p=80&id=18824&of=

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bluebutterflyart/2335592500/
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N30Nb100d
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2009 04:31:30 PM »

I lost the ability to form coherent thoughts right when I saw this. That's a lot of lace!! Some of it looks like it's high quality too. Nice lace is insanely expensive so I really wish the Goodwill here had things like this, but I've never found anything good there.
I'm not sure what your clothing preferences are, but try looking for lolita patterns. They call for yards upon yards of lace/trim, and the skirts are usually quite straight forward to sew. You can adapt them to your style fairly easily too if you're not interested in lolita (by choosing a different fabric for instance or not making them as wide).
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edelC
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2009 09:13:07 PM »

polyester type lace will wash fine with a garment, cotton lace should too, but it might be best to prewash it in case of shrinkage.

I would wash the whole lot, in a gentle cycle in the machine (put it all into a pillowcase or one of those bags you use to launder underwired bras) I would tend to do this rather than be overly gentle with it at this stage (ie gentle hand wash) becuase if you work hard and make it into a garment, you dont want it to fall apart at the first washing! At least if you have washed it first you know it will stand up to regular laundering once you make it into clothing
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Obsessed Knitter
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2009 11:51:26 PM »

polyester type lace will wash fine with a garment, cotton lace should too, but it might be best to prewash it in case of shrinkage.

I would wash the whole lot, in a gentle cycle in the machine (put it all into a pillowcase or one of those bags you use to launder underwired bras) I would tend to do this rather than be overly gentle with it at this stage (ie gentle hand wash) becuase if you work hard and make it into a garment, you dont want it to fall apart at the first washing! At least if you have washed it first you know it will stand up to regular laundering once you make it into clothing

Sounds like a good plan of attack. I was planning to start wrapping these up (against themselves or cardboard) and doing a bit of organizing, but I might as well just put them back into the bag until I get a laundry bag. I'll wash them all before I start cataloging what exactly I have. Pretty much all of the lace is at least a yard (great for purses, cuffs, etc), and most of them are a great deal more than that, so when I wrap them I'm going to measure them so I know what I have. There's no point in wrapping/measuring before I wash them, incase they shrink.

So, wash in warm water on gentle cycle inside a lingerie bag?

Ludi - Thanks for the great links!

N30Nb100d - How do you tell if a lace is of high quality? Pattern complexity? Starch-iness? Width? Softness?

« Last Edit: July 01, 2009 12:01:07 AM by Obsessed Knitter » THIS ROCKS   Logged

edelC
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« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2009 01:16:33 AM »

high quality...look it and feel it, if its scratchy polyester its just regular. higher quality wiill look better, feel better (often softer as they tend to startch cheaper fabrics to make them hold their shape) detail, look at the back as well as the front, if there is very little difference then it is higher quality. All else being equal width will then dictate how much it cost. wider=generally more expensive,

try and wrap them up and tie off with a safety pin (make sure you take out the pins immediately and make sure they are bright shiny ones) before you put them into the lingerie bag, otherwise you will have lace macrame!!
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N30Nb100d
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2009 05:12:28 PM »

Generally, softer, cotton lace is considered higher quality while lace that looks like tulle/netting isn't as good. edelC pretty much covered it, but here is a guide I think describes the types/quality of lace pretty well, with a couple pictures for reference: http://lolita-handbook.livejournal.com/1955.html
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Obsessed Knitter
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2009 05:46:21 PM »

Generally, softer, cotton lace is considered higher quality while lace that looks like tulle/netting isn't as good. edelC pretty much covered it, but here is a guide I think describes the types/quality of lace pretty well, with a couple pictures for reference: http://lolita-handbook.livejournal.com/1955.html

What a great reference! Thanks for the link; I'm a very visual person so it really helped. From what I saw as I dug through the bag initially it looks like probably half to three quarters is high quality lace. I never knew about looking on the back, N30Nb100d , that's a good idea. Some of them are pinned off already, but safety pins (instead of straight pins) might minimize the potential for ouchies.
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N30Nb100d
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2009 06:00:24 PM »

I'm a visual person too and that's why I like that reference. Glad I could help!

PS. edelC suggested to look at the back of the lace, but it definitely is a great idea  Smiley
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