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Topic: What kind of embroidery is this?  (Read 1187 times)
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Mrs_Boats
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« on: June 30, 2009 12:54:59 PM »

I found this (I think it's a dresser scarf) at a thrift shop, for 25¢. I thought the embroidery was cool-I've never seen anything like it. It's almost like drawn work, or at least, that's the closest thing I can come up with to compare it to, even though I know that's not what it is. It's not on aida cloth, but whatever it is does have an even, slightly raised weave. There's *nothing* on the back of the fabric, not even knots.  Shocked

This design is on one end. It looks like the gray is variegated; it fades in and out over the length of the work. This is most of the center piece (the whole thing didn't fit in my scanner).



This is a close-up; I tried to pick a dark spot so you can see the thread go under the weave.



So...what is it? Huh If I knew what to call it, I could maybe find some basics about it. I'd love to give it a try!
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2009 01:14:09 PM »

The stitch itself looks like
Couching- Lay a thread along the line of the design and with another thread tie it down at even intervals with a small stitch into the fabric.  The tying stitch can be of contrasting color to the laid thread if desired.
As for the pattern of the design itself, I'm stumped...
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2009 01:40:37 PM »

I think this is Swedish huck weaving.  It is mostly used for table linens and it is done on a special kind of cloth.  Nice piece you found!
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Unstylish, clichéd, or outmoded.

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Mrs_Boats
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2009 01:56:57 PM »

I think this is Swedish huck weaving.  It is mostly used for table linens and it is done on a special kind of cloth.  Nice piece you found!

Thank you! According to Madame Google (knows all, tells all), this is in fact Swedish huck weaving, on (surprise!) huck cloth. Learn something new every day-that's why I love this board!

mafiosagrrl, I don't know what the pattern is called either, but from a quick look at google images, that kind of triangle motif seems to be common.

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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2009 03:29:26 PM »

this is huckwork.  on 'huckaback' cloth.  The thing about huck work is its actually amazingly easy to do, and a great starter embroidery for children around 5 years old.  This is because you use a dull needle, or dobbin, and don't ever pierce the cloth- all the threads are woven through the 'floating' loops on the surface of the cloth.  There's a good rundown on it in the reader's digest complete guide to needlework, which came out in the 70s.  (i picked one up at a thrift store for $2.  if you see it BUY IT it is a great resource, although there could be a bit more detail in some of the sections it has awesome stitch diagrams for almost any needlework you would want.)
  Huck embroidery was popular up through the early 50s, although it was really big from the 30s and 40s, due to the fact that it used less thread than many other kinds of embellishments and the huckaback was cheap.  Nowadays its tough to find it anywhere, but it is a neat technique to do.  The motifs in your example are made up of stitches called "offsets".
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2009 04:36:56 PM »

Huckwork made a mini comeback a couple of years ago. Go to Nordic Needle or Mary Maxim to get the cloth and patterns. It is sometimes called Monk's cloth, as well as huck cloth.
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longtimegeek
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« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2009 05:15:18 PM »

Yes - my mother-in-law did a lot of this kind of work.  This is a very common pattern.  My sister-in-law put some of the tea towels she was given as a wedding present in her garage sale for a quarter too.  I bought them mostly to not have it not go out of the family. 
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« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2009 04:52:42 PM »

Hobby Lobby also sells Monk's cloth.

This is lovely, you made a great score!
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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2011 02:40:18 PM »

What you have is a piece of Swedish Weaving on Huck (I think). Swedish Weaving is a surface embroidery (counted needlework) that usually uses floss or #5 Perle cotton yarns on a Huck fabric.  Then there is the standard Monk's Cloth 100% cotton 7ct fabric that usually uses 4 ply worsted weight acrylic yarns.
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