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Topic: pot holder assembly - advice please  (Read 819 times)
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bookwormbethie
« on: June 26, 2009 06:58:17 AM »

Hi y'all.  I plan to make a pot holder using 2 pieces of coton fabric, 2 layers of cotton batting, and 2 layers of terry cloth (for my insulating layer) inside.

I do not want to use insul-bright for my insulating layer as I find it quite strange (and a bit like nails on a chalkboard) that it makes that weird crinkly sound when touched --- that is why I am going to use 2 layers of cotton terry cloth.

I would prefer not to sew a potholder "sandwich" and finish by covering the raw edges with bias tape.  So now I am wondering the best way to put the pot holder together.

(1) Should I sew it all the layers together (in appropriate layers of terry cloth batting fabric fabric batting terry cloth) and leave a large hole for turning, sew around all sides, OR will the seams turn out to be way to bulky?

OR (2) should I sew the 2 pieces of cotton, right sides together, leaving one side completely open, and then tuck in pre cut squares of batting, terry cloth, terry cloth, and batting, fold the raw edges of the cotton pot holder in, and stitch all around the square?Huh?


Advice appreciated!  thanks
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Ashling
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2009 07:24:01 AM »

I think option 2 is better.  Sewing and turning will leave you with  very bulky seams.
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soorawn
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2009 08:07:15 AM »

When you sew several layers together, the way to lessen the bulk is trimming the allowances in an escalated manner, for instance: 1st layer left with a 5mm allowance, 2nd layer with a 4mm allowance, 3rd layer with a 3mm allowance (these measures here are only for illustrative purposes).

If you chooose option 2 though, I recommend quilting the item so that the inner layers don't get misplaced later.
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elijor
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2009 08:24:20 AM »

I would recommend something similar to soorawn's idea. Decide on the finished size of the potholder. Cut the insides (batting & terry) to that size and the outter fabric 1" larger. Center one layer of batting and terry on the wrong side of each outer fabric. Baste in place. Put the stacks right sides together and sew around using a zipper foot to get close to the inner fabrics (don't get too close or there won't be enuf room for the inner fabrics - 2 or 3 "threads" should leave sufficient room). Leave an opening to turn - make sure the opening is at the center of one of the sides not the corner (it is much harder to get that corner looking nice if you have to try to "tuck it in"). Turn, press, topstitch around at least twice (once real close to the edge to close the opening nicely and a second about 1/2" in to hold the inner layers in place). You could also do the close topstitching then some sort of quilting to keep the layers in place. Remove the basting.

If you try option 2 you should not "leave one side completely open". Sew it least 1" into each side. The corners are hard to get turned in nicely. and you should still have plenty of room to get the inner layers in.
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donniesgirl
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2009 09:05:55 AM »

You could also use fabric in place of the bias tape & slip stitch both sides, but then quilt through the whole thing.  Like a quilt.
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bookwormbethie
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2009 09:15:54 AM »

oh thank y'all for your prompt replies!  i will focus on option 2, and take a closer examination about what elijor said after lunch!

i did try using a layer of ironing board material once in a finger tip mitt but ouch! it didn't work, the finger tip mitt does work well to lift pot lids off of hot pots and such, but not for taking anything out of the oven. 

i really want functioning pot holders.....  just out of curiosity, what do y'all use for your insulating layers in pot holders?  do y'all like insul bright and find that it works well despite it's noise making?

thanks again!
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Ashling
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2009 11:57:11 AM »

Well, the last time I made potholders, I didn't have money to buy insulating material, so I cut up some cotton pants that were too small for my husband.  I think I used 3-5 layers for insulation.  That was years ago, and I haven't burned myself with them yet!
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KLKing
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« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2009 01:40:04 AM »

Cut the insides (batting & terry) to that size and the outter fabricf the pothold 1" larger. Center one layer of batting and terry on the wrong side of each outer fabric. Baste in place. Put the stacks right sides together . Leave an opening to turn - make sure the opening is at the center of one of the sides not the corner (it is much harder to get that corner looking nice if you have to try to "tuck it in"). Turn, press, topstitch around at least twice (once real close to the edge to close the opening nicely and a second about 1/2" in to hold the inner layers in place). You could also do the close topstitching then some sort of quilting to keep the layers in place. Remove the basting.                               ...                                             I agree with a lot of this post. I do have one idea for bulk reduction, that you machine quilt the batting and terry layers together, then trim down the thicker of the two, so it is not caught inside the seam allowance. It can actually be 1/8 " away all around, if you stabilize it this way. then say you leave the batting larger, trim that down after it is stitched together. I think the idea of assembling the two halves, of equal layers is best, because the seam allowances are centered and the bulk is not on one side. Don't forget to clip the corners. a rounded corner notched out slightly would turn better than a squared off corner. and do leave as small an opening as possible. Finish as stated previously.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009 01:41:24 AM by KLKing » THIS ROCKS   Logged

elijor
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2009 07:32:16 AM »

Quote
I do have one idea for bulk reduction, that you machine quilt the batting and terry layers together, then trim down the thicker of the two, so it is not caught inside the seam allowance.


Actually in my "recipe" you wouldn't have either the batting or terry in the seam allowance. That is why the "topstitch 1/2" in or quilting" would be required.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2009 12:54:24 PM by elijor » THIS ROCKS   Logged
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