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Topic: Cutting a knit sweater....  (Read 474 times)
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PrutsPrinses
« on: May 20, 2009 02:56:40 AM »

Hello everyone Smiley
I have a question, I want to do a sewing project in fact but I thought the knitting people might know more about this.
I have a sweater (I can't post pictures yet, so here's a link): http://www.craftster.org/pictures/data/500/medium/Foto_71.jpg
It's too short. So I want to make a bolero / shrug out of it, those have to be short anyway Smiley But I am wondering:
How do I cut this and not unravel the whole thing?
Do I have to tie knots after cutting or sew them tight in some way?
What do you do to stop knit from unravelling after cutting through?
Thank you for helping Smiley
PS: do tell me if it's not possible anyway, I'll give the sweater to Goodwill then... But I really really love it so I'm trying to find a way to wear it without looking dumb Smiley
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lapoli
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« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2009 05:55:25 AM »

What is it made from?  If it's wool (or something kind of sticky) you can steek it--since you're a sewer, it may not scare you as much as it scares knitters! Smiley

If it's made from cotton or acrylic, I'm not sure if it can be steeked because the fibers may be too slippery to stay put, though perhaps someone else around here can advise better?
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redwitch
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2009 10:02:54 AM »

Hiya

Your best option is probably to sew a line of stitches beside your cutting line: let's say you had a square of knitting and you wanted it to be circular. You could sew a circle of stitches in the fabric (outline of a circle) and cut around it (on the outside). The fabric outside the circle would fall apart. The circle would be intact. The stitches must be capable of holding the yarn stitches together though so fairly small and tight.

Sarah
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albarinos
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2009 12:50:58 PM »

Hiya

Your best option is probably to sew a line of stitches beside your cutting line: let's say you had a square of knitting and you wanted it to be circular. You could sew a circle of stitches in the fabric (outline of a circle) and cut around it (on the outside). The fabric outside the circle would fall apart. The circle would be intact. The stitches must be capable of holding the yarn stitches together though so fairly small and tight.

Sarah



ditto to that. I usually use a zig-zag stitch on my sewing machine, though, not a straight one. Just for a little more prevention.
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Riki
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2009 07:13:14 PM »

Then, adding to what the others have said about stitching and then cutting, you would want to sew some sort of binding around it. If it were me (as a knitter and crocheter), I would either crochet or knit an edge using the sewed line to anchor the stitches. As a seamstress, you could simply get some binding material and sew around it - using it as a decorative addition.
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PrutsPrinses
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2009 01:51:36 AM »

Quote
What is it made from?  If it's wool (or something kind of sticky) you can steek it--since you're a sewer, it may not scare you as much as it scares knitters!

If it's made from cotton or acrylic, I'm not sure if it can be steeked because the fibers may be too slippery to stay put, though perhaps someone else around here can advise better?

It's made from a cotton-acrylic blend... I had to look up the word steeking and found some interesting things, still it seemed to concern mainly wool... One of the methods was the one redwitch and albarinos suggested.
But if I do that and then cut it off, I will have rough edges, right?
It seems like after steeking or sewing a line next to the cutting line, people usually attach it to another part, and I will have to leave it open...

And redwitch, when the stitches outside the circle fall apart, won't the stitching fall off when it everything outside it has fallen off?

Riki, the binding idea sounds good! And if you would crochet or knit an edge, would that mean you don't cut off the material until where you want it to be, but keep some spare bits to make the finish? If you crochet or knit an edge, is that like making some kind of knots? Where do the loose ends go?

Thank you all for your good ideas Smiley
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lapoli
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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2009 03:53:05 AM »

The reason why most of the steeking information is about wool is because most wools are sticky enough that when you cut them, although you still have to anchor stitches, the fibers have enough grip to not slip further.  Cotton, Acrylic, Bamboo, etc., are all fibers that are more slippery and so you're going to have to fight with them more in order for your plans to work (which is why most people don't recommend cutting knitting/steeking for garments made of something other than wool).  If you DO cut it, I would just take every precaution imaginable to make sure the fibers are fully stabilized and secure.

I did some research, too, and you may want to run to a bookstore or library to look for No Sheep For You.  The book gives a lot of detail about working with non-wool yarns and has provided a section detailing steeking with plant-based fibers.  Hope it helps!
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