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Topic: Boning Tutorial  (Read 6530 times)
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desm88
« on: May 14, 2009 04:57:26 AM »

Oh Noes! Boning! Aaaaaahh!
Does this sound like you or someone you know? It used to sound like me, but not any more.
So don't hide under that table - boning isn't hard at all! You can do it!

 Bone? As in whale bone?
Originally the 'bones' in corsets were whale teeth. Today, you don't need to borrow any teeth at all. There are several kinds of imitation teeth available, in lots of different widths:

Steel boning:
These come in different stiffnesses. They usually have quite a bit of bendability, but still offer good support and shape to a garment. They come in pre-cut sizes with coated tips.


Spiral steel boning:
Made of, you guessed it, spirals of steel, these bones bend both ways.




Plastic boning:
These are usually pre-encased in some kind of cotton or polyester cover. You can leave them in and sew directly onto the fabric case, or you can take them out and use a stronger casing. 


Rigilene boning:
This is the lightest boning available, mostly used for shaping rather than support.
It's also the only kind of boning that you can sew on directly.


Wire boning:
If you're feeling particularly thrifty, you can go down to the local hardware store and pick up some metal wire. If you use this, remember to put it in a pillow case or something like that when you cut it, so shards don't fly into your face. Also, you'll need to finish the tip either by melting it or coating it in plastic or rubber.
And remember: since it's not flat, it won't blend in to the garment as well. It's best used for something like a corset where you don't mind highlighting the boning.


 How does it go on?
Unless you're using the pre-made case on plastic boning or sewing through rigilene, you'll need some fabric to use as a case to hold the boning on to your garment.
My personal favorite is double fold bias tape:
It comes pre-folded in a strip that forms a neat, strong non-raw edged strip. You can also make your own.



You can apply the casing in different ways:

directly on to lining fabric, boning on the inside of the lining


directly on to lining fabric, boning on the outside of lining


onto the seam allowance of a seam



 How do I apply the casing?

1) Decide where you want the boning to go, measure the length of where it will lie. This should be about half an inch longer than the bone you are using.

2) Cut a length of bias tape (or whatever you're using for casing) to your measurement from step 1, plus one inch.
 
3) Fold down half an inch at each end of the casing and press. This will enclose the raw edges at each end.


4) Pin the casing to your fabric.

5) Leaving enough space for the boning in the casing:
a) Sewing directly on fabric: Sew down one side of the casing, along the bottom, and back up the other side.
b) Sewing on seam allowance: Fold the fabric away from the seam, leaving one side of the seam allowance. Sew along this side. Repeat on the other side. Hand sew the bottom to the seam allowance, leaving the outer side of the garment alone.


6) Insert bone

7) Sew along the top of the case.

That's it!

I hope the fabulous paint illustrations were helpful. Let me know if anything's unclear Smiley
« Last Edit: May 14, 2009 07:56:50 PM by desm88 » THIS ROCKS   Logged
kriminie
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2009 06:52:53 AM »

OMG thank you so much!!  Grin Grin
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2009 02:03:27 PM »

oh Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! I've been really considering working on a corset, I ever found the most perfect fabric at a thrift store, I was just scared to death of the boning! you are a saint!
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ScotSkipper402
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2009 03:35:08 PM »

Bone? As in whale bone?
Originally the 'bones' in corsets were whale ribs. Today, you don't need to borrow any ribs at all.



I hope the fabulous paint illustrations were helpful. Let me know if anything's unclear Smiley

BRILLIANT tute. Thanks!

Here's a fun fact I learned recently. Originally the 'bones' in corsets were not whale ribs, but the strange stringy krill-filtering fibers from baleen whale (?) jaws. Boneish, and absolutely skeletal, and even stranger than rib bones.
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kriminie
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2009 05:05:00 PM »

sssooo.. whale teeth??? so we are really ... teething our clothes?Huh

LOL
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desm88
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2009 08:03:38 PM »

Bone? As in whale bone?
Originally the 'bones' in corsets were whale ribs. Today, you don't need to borrow any ribs at all.



I hope the fabulous paint illustrations were helpful. Let me know if anything's unclear Smiley

BRILLIANT tute. Thanks!

Here's a fun fact I learned recently. Originally the 'bones' in corsets were not whale ribs, but the strange stringy krill-filtering fibers from baleen whale (?) jaws. Boneish, and absolutely skeletal, and even stranger than rib bones.

aaah you're right, they are!  Embarrassed That would be one ginormous corset if it was made with whale ribs
I blame it on the late hour of posting.. corsets cinch in ribs, but they're not made of ribs
Thanks for catching my mental hiccup Grin

it's now edited, as well as the step for taking measurements for the casing cover.. so there's room for the case to close on the top and bottom.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2009 08:04:12 PM by desm88 » THIS ROCKS   Logged
Alatarial
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2009 12:21:16 AM »

Thank you soooo sooo much!
You just might be my new hero.
I am so bookmarking this
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Juniper_Ann
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2009 02:36:38 PM »

Great advice.  If you want heavier boning than the kind you can get in the fabric store, but you're not will to pay steel boning prices, you can use cable ties for boning, which you can get from Home Depot for a couple of bucks (a google search reveals a lot of Elizabethan costumers who use this).  However, cable ties can't be used for very curvy late Victorian patterns because they don't bend side-to-side like spring steel.

Another interesting possibility is hemp cord boning:

http://www.festiveattyre.com/research/cording/cord.html

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desm88
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2009 04:02:40 PM »

Great advice.  If you want heavier boning than the kind you can get in the fabric store, but you're not will to pay steel boning prices, you can use cable ties for boning, which you can get from Home Depot for a couple of bucks (a google search reveals a lot of Elizabethan costumers who use this).  However, cable ties can't be used for very curvy late Victorian patterns because they don't bend side-to-side like spring steel.

Another interesting possibility is hemp cord boning:

http://www.festiveattyre.com/research/cording/cord.html


cable ties! that's what I was thinking of when I wrote 'wire from the hardware store' Grin
thanks for the correction! I've never used them myself, though
however, you could use them for victorian corsets. usually any corset will use the steel boning that doesn't bend sideway. Spiral steel is usually more for a bodice or something else that doesn't really cinch.

the hemp cord is interesting. that sounds like something usable for a tudor farthingale, since they did use rope (at least in the early ones)

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