A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Do you know about all of these Craftster features?
Total Members: 297,060
Currently Running With Scissors:
557 Guests and 8 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: interfacing in clothes?  (Read 417 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
bookwormbethie
« on: April 29, 2009 01:12:58 PM »

I'd like to do a mock up of this dress in view C using either muslin or broadcloth in case i mess up.
http://www.mccallpattern.com/item/M5654.htm?search=5654&page=1

Although it does not mention it on the package envelope (unless I overlooked it) in the directions is says to apply 'facing' to 2 rectangular pieces of fabric  that end up going behind the front and back upper edges of the dress.

The only interfacing I have ever used is the sew-in kind when I make zippered pouches.  I do understand how iron on interfacing works, I just have no idea what kind to use for this dress, the directions do not give any clue as to what type to use.

any advice much appreciated!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Cheyenneswthrt07
I cann't quiet the creative monkey in my head!
Offline Offline

Posts: 1224
Joined: 25-Nov-2007


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2009 01:55:39 PM »

OMG I have that pattern in cue for myself too, I just need fabric! lol

In step 13 it starts with the fusable interfacing.  Your to apply it to the wrong side of pieces 6 and 7, which are the back facing of the top part, I'm guessing for more stability for the straps.

Personally I detest iron interfacing and take the few extra minutes to sew regular facing in and trim it.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

soorawn
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2009 02:05:38 PM »

I would use a light to mid-weight for that.  It also depends on the fabric you're going to use.  I'm sure the shop assistant will be able to help you with the choice, they are supposed to know what to use with what.  Iron-on or sewed on, it depends on your taste.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

50 projects for 2011:  15/50
bookwormbethie
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2009 03:43:08 PM »

OMG I have that pattern in cue for myself too, I just need fabric! lol

In step 13 it starts with the fusable interfacing.  Your to apply it to the wrong side of pieces 6 and 7, which are the back facing of the top part, I'm guessing for more stability for the straps.

Personally I detest iron interfacing and take the few extra minutes to sew regular facing in and trim it.

oh hurrah i don't like iron on interfacing either!  i have heard that it can be quite tricky to iron, and then over time it can pucker and not adhere anymore!

i would LOVE to know how to "sew regular facing in and trim it."  Can you kindly point out a few web linkies for me that explain why garments are faced and how to use sew regular in regular facing (do you mean the plain ol sew in kind?Huh) and not use iron on facing? 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Cheyenneswthrt07
I cann't quiet the creative monkey in my head!
Offline Offline

Posts: 1224
Joined: 25-Nov-2007


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2009 04:43:55 PM »

By regular interfacing I ment the sew in kind.

Here is how I do it, I put the needle in the position all the way to the right, then I use the edge of my foot and sew around the interfacing pinned to the piece, then when I'm done I carefully trim the interfacing edge closer to where I sewed, leaving the material edge as bare as I can, then I give it all a good ironing. 

I've had horrible experiences with iron on interfacing, on shirts I made for my son and husband where I eventually just ripped it all out. 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

bookwormbethie
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2009 06:06:27 PM »

oh hurrah, I have used sew in interfacing before and have some in my stash!

I think I understand what you are saying, I will consult my manual to see if my machine has the capability of different needle positions.

Are you leaving the material edge as bare as you can to keep your "seam allowances" free of unneccessary material and such?  So that it wll be easy for the needle to sew in the seam allowance when it's time?

If so, then I might try using sew in interfacing on this sewing machine cozy pattern I have.  It calls for fusible poly fleece or something but if I can sub sew in interfacing and just keep my seam allowances "naked" then I might try the sew in interfacing!

Oh P.S.  What kind of color/pattern were you thinking of for your fabric?  I envision making mine in navy blue and then maybe making a second one in a bold pattern but didn't know how important it would be to try to line up the pattern's motif for the seams like you would do for plaid or stripes.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Cheyenneswthrt07
I cann't quiet the creative monkey in my head!
Offline Offline

Posts: 1224
Joined: 25-Nov-2007


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2009 06:19:04 PM »

OK this is going to sound so anal, especially considering I seal almost all my seams with a serger, but I trim away the interface so that it looks cleaner.  That's the only reason why. 

I'm going to use this dark green sheet I have sitting in the linen closet, I figured what the hay, we don't use flat sheets anyways.  The next time I use it, I'll aim for a bolder pattern.  I'm trying hard to cut back on my trips to Jo-ann's, this month alone I've dropped $50 in two trips  Undecided 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

bookwormbethie
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2009 08:29:42 PM »

wow that you have a serger!  tomorow i'm going to have to try to look at the pics in your profile so i can see the fancy things you've done!

i just noticed on the sewing machine cozy directions for poly fleece interfacing it talks about applying it but still leaving letting the seam allowance all around be "naked"  I suppose to making sewing easier if you are using heavy interfacing.  I'll have to try that with the sew in interfacing when I make my sewing machine cozy.

So I don't think you are anal at all for trimming your interfacing edges as it probably makes sewing the seams easier since there is less bulk, right?Huh

Yes I've been to JoAnns quite a few times last week, taht daffodil dash and the coupons they mail you, give you at the store in advance, and e-mail you were too crazy good to pass up!!!!!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Thesingingllamas
Queen of the Waffles
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108
Joined: 10-Feb-2005


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2009 10:56:35 PM »

Use a fusible knit interfacing. It is a little bit different and not quite as tricky. If it isn't sticking use a little steam or a damp cloth or spray it with a little water. The package calls for 5/8yd fusible interfacing for sizes 6 to 16 and 3/4 yd for 18 and 20. It is right under the dress yardages.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Best & Worst Beauty
DIY Fuller and Longer Lashes
Supermodel Secrets: Coco Rocha on Taking the Perfect Selfie
Surprising Beauty Uses for Baking Soda
Tips For Full and Voluminous Hair
Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Decoupaged Table Top
August 20, 2014 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Faux Cross Stitch Sweatshirt

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.