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Topic: TRANSFERS...new easy technique using PARCHMENT paper  (Read 3146 times)
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« on: February 06, 2009 09:21:19 AM »

Recently there appears to be a new hopefully-foolproof method for doing transfers onto polymer clay that has been discussed in the polymer clay community. I haven't even had time to add the info to my glassattic page on Transfers as of today.
This one involves using baking parchment paper, especially with images from toner or the new permanent inkjet inks (no liquid clay required for a direct transfer to clay, no solvents/soaking required), though the parchment should be as smooth as possible (Reynolds is a bit too textured/bumpy for the best results).

Here is the info I have so far:


transfers using baking parchment paper

(orig. suggested by Valerie Aharoni)

Valerie's lesson: http://valerieaharoni.com/2008/12/those-elusive-transfers.html
(no water or other release agent needed)
...print image onto parchment paper ...reverse image if want, or if it contains words/letters/numbers
......(you won't see the image well on the baking parchment because the paper is translucent. Trish H.)
...cut the paper to the image (size?)
...lay the image onto a sheet of raw clay...once the image makes contact it begins to immediately transfer... can't reposition the paper so I always use a large sheet of raw clay and trim excess later
...burnish (does need to be too hard)
...remove paper... all of the ink will have transferred! (while burnishing you can see the ink moving off  the paper, leaving it looking more like plain parchment paper). Valerie
(or, lift one corner to make sure it's transferring, then burnish more if not)

Trish H's video lesson (slightly different?--DB check)
http://www.polyclayplay.com/Products/Parchment/ParchmentVideo.htm

mostly from Valerie:

...I've used a Brother bw laser and a Samsung color laser with great results (laser printers use toner instead of ink, like a photocopier would).
...I have used an Epson and HP inkjet --does work, but not as vivid...(and coverage may not be complete... some newer inkjet printer use special "permanent inks" though which do work well)
..... Canon inkjets are the most temperamental so some adjustments in the process may need to happen. I am hearing that the print is transferring but that the transfer is not permanent so a layer of liquid clay set by heat gun should work (or in oven?) to make the transfer permanent.
...don't make your ink (or toner?) setting too thick on paper bec. may then smear (author?)

...I have used 3 different brands of baking parchment paper... all 3 work but one worked better.
... The smoother the parchment paper, the better the transfer.
... my parchment paper choice is BAK-O-MATIC by Dixie.
........my Bak-O-Matic is 'silicone' treated "from vegetable oils"?
... Bak-O-Matic is available thru restaurant and commercial kitchen suppliers.... it's used to line huge pans (and comes in a box? ...DB check Smart & Final)
....Valerie is also selling this paper at cost through her etsy site:
http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=19975920
...(anonymous said) Reynolds parchment paper from the grocery store has a little too much texture on it for perfect transfers...not all parts of it will lie flat on the clay, and may leave parts not transferring.
..."baking" parchment paper is the same on both sides...the reports of paper being used that is different one side from another has me wondering what paper is being used in those cases
...The paper I use is flat.... When I tried the papers on the roll, I simply put the cut sheet into the printer with the curl opposite to the feed path.... Some who are using paper from a roll are finding that if you take a plain piece of copy paper and put a fold about a inch from the short end, then tuck the baking parchment into that, it will feed better, but I simply find the 'straight' feed path, the one where the paper does not need to go around the roller. It may be in the back, or a drop down door in the front.

It's amazing how good the transfer is, and I was also able to apply texture (stamping) on top of the transfer as the toner color stretches and gives with the clay.... other transfer methods leave more of a decal on the top of the clay so stamping cuts and tears the transferred image. Susan

========================================================

Valerie Aharoni's blog http://valerieaharoni.com

========================================================

Trish H's trick for loading small-size, or thin, or slippery, papers into copiers (and printers?)...

 ....I came up with away to feed the (thin, slippery? baking parchment) paper without having to tape it to another sheet.
I folded over about 3/8" of the top of a plain sheet of paper.
I creased the fold using my finger nail to get a very sharp crease.
I slipped the parchment paper under the fold and loaded it in the paper tray.
I used the printer setting for Thick Paper (under the Paper Tab) and kept the Best Quality set (under the Graphic Tab).
This tricked the printer into thinking it was a heavy piece of paper.
Note: Be careful to design your image so it's low enough on the page to miss the 3/8" top of the folded paper. Trish H.
(also see below for other techniques that can work)

============================



Diane B.






« Last Edit: March 01, 2009 10:43:42 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
jessartisan
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2009 01:09:47 PM »

Thanks for the info!  I just bought some to see how it goes.
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Bakeneko
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2009 08:06:20 PM »

This method does not work with Cannon inks   Angry Stupid unhelpful printer of mine
« Last Edit: February 25, 2009 03:15:01 PM by Bakeneko » THIS ROCKS   Logged

KellyLiz
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2009 02:39:51 AM »

 I can see some fantastic applications for this technique, particularly with brooches and beads. Going to give this a try and will post results. Thanks for posting this info and the video link.
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ahwi
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2009 10:44:48 AM »

Thanks for the info! will definitely try this Cheesy
Thank you! Smiley
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2009 11:59:29 AM »

Quote
Thanks for the info! will definitely try this
Thank you!

Just be sure you noticed (either below or in the other thread where this was discussed**) that regular inkjet inks don't work all that well even when using the best parchment papers; those inks really require special transfer papers of various kinds to work their best. 

The special waterproof inks that some of the newer inkjet printers use do work well though, and toner always works well (photocopiers, laser printers).


**http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=293136.0


Diane B.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Lylyfai
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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2009 01:24:30 PM »

Vellum paper also works really well and goes in the printer with fewer problems.
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2009 03:53:54 PM »

But does vellum give highly saturated transfers when placed directly on clay, using regular inkjet ink?   Or does it just work well for the "good" inks and for toners, when making liquid clay decals that have to be soaked, etc, like many other slick papers do?

Diane B.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2009 03:55:41 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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