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Topic: How to measure woven cloth on Rigid Heddle Loom??  (Read 4024 times)
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subloke
« on: February 05, 2009 11:36:01 AM »

I know this will probably end up being one of those really obvious answers, but I am a self-taught weaver and it's kind of all a mystery to me. 

I have a Schacht Flip Rigid Heddle loom and I love it.  One thing I never seem to be able to get right though is the actual measurement of my finished cloth while weaving.  Is there a way to keep track of the finished length of the cloth as I go?  Does this even make sense?

Thanks.
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009 01:30:52 PM »

You know, I was thinking this very thing the other day.  I thought perhaps you could take a tape measure and wind it on the beam as you wind on the finished material, lining up the end of the tape with the bottom edge of the finished cloth and letting them wind on together.  Does that make sense?  I haven't tried it out, but thought that might be a solution.
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009 03:17:26 PM »

That TOTALLY works, nicolassa.
Also, if you have a fabric tape measure, you can pin it as you go so you don't have to wind it up and if you run out of tape measure you can start it over.

Keep in mind that while you are weaving, the fabric will be under tension and will loose some length when loosened. I remember working on a project where I HAD to have a certain length and I actually released the tension, unwound the fabric and measured. (This was also on a floor loom, I assume you can do the same with a RH loom.)
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subloke
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2009 03:29:20 PM »

Thanks!  The tape measure sounds like a good solution.  I'll have to give that one a try. 
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Weddy_in_Paris
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2009 12:39:52 PM »

The tape measure is surely the best way, but if you don't have any or if it's too short, you can pin on the edge of your weaving a cheap ribbon (like those which are for reinforcing the seaming - well, at least in the good old time -  I don't know how they are called in English) or a thick yarn (contrasting in color is better) the length you want your fabric to be. When there is no ribbon left, then you are done.
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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2009 07:11:51 AM »

Ooooh, nice tip, Weddy!   Smiley
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subloke
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2009 05:15:21 AM »

Thanks Weddy!  That's a great tip!  I'll give it a try when I warp my loom on the weekend.
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knittinbug
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2009 08:04:43 AM »

I'm self taught Rigid Heddle Weaver too.  I haven't tried winding on a tape measure, but I do use removable stitch markers (they look like orange and blue plastic safety pins made by Clover I think) to keep track of my length and keep a ruler or tape measure at hand.    Once I knit 5 inches in length, I clip an orange removable marker on the selvedge of the work at that point to mark the first 5 inches.  At the next 5 inch mark, I place a blue to mark 10 inches.  I then alternate orange and blue.  I sometimes keep a record of my accumulated length on scratch paper, sometimes I just make sure the markers protrude from the edge so I can count them.  I then know how much I've knit.  I don't always just mark 5 and 10 with the markers.  Sometimes I just measure, mark, record length on scratch paper -  and then when I advance I place another marker or just move the one I had and record the new length.

If I am doing a pattern, I do what Betty Davenport advises in one of her books.  I use a strip of paper to make a template ad mark the distances between color changes so I can get a match on the other end.
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subloke
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2009 09:48:57 AM »

knittinbug- thanks for this tip!  I think this may be what i end up doing as I don't have a spare measuring tape around. 
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ni
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2009 02:52:11 PM »

knittinbug, that's a great idea for the color change. I always try to keep track of exactly how many rows I knit, which can be tedious when knitting something like a blanket. I'll have to try this out.
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henofthewoods
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2009 07:17:51 AM »

I had to make 11 identical squares for class. The first square was released from tension and measured and compared to measurements under tension. I repeated the measurements under tension for the next ten.

I used a tapestry needle to put in a piece of yarn every two inches (they were only 11 inch squares.) This worked pretty well.
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calebsb
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2009 10:53:49 PM »

In the weaving studio where I used to work we cut a narrow 36" long strip off our roll of packing paper and pinned it to the work.  When after a couple of advances the pin reached the breast beam we would release tension and move the pin to the top of the work without moving the paper tape.  As long as we remembered to make a note on the tape each time we finished a yard and went back to the bottom of the tape we were able to have pretty accurate measurements even with 50 yards on the beam.  Some people were a bit paranoid about coming up short and would bump an inch or so with each yard but I never bumped by more than a pick and I don't think I ever finished short.  The problem I see with actually winding on a measuring tape is that the finished cloth will gradually stretch and the tape will not.  With this method I would expect a long piece to turn up much shorter than you think when it is finally unrolled.  Whatever you do I don' t recommend any measuring while the piece is under tension, even for comparison.
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peachymanaangel
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2009 06:58:58 PM »

If you are near Ikea they have yarn long paper measuring tapes for free. They are great to pin to the cloth as you weave.
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textilejnkie
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2010 11:54:09 AM »

This may not help, becuase I have a 4 shaft table loom....

I wind an extra warp with a contrasting color, and I tie that onto the back beam in the center of the warp before I wind onto the beam.   Then I take my spare boat shuttle bobbin and I wind that with the extra warp.  I let that sit on my castle.  As I advance the finished cloth I wind the bobbin, also.  Then I can unwind the bobbin to measure how far I have woven.  I put a little overhand knot at the point where I am starting and stopping if I have multiple projects in the same warp (dish towels, Rugs, excreta).
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