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Topic: London hood - historic pattern and super cute! *img heavy* ...now with TUTORIAL  (Read 50408 times)
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pseudo_pix
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« on: October 08, 2008 01:06:08 PM »

I've been making a ton of hand sewn hoods for selling in a local medieval unions market shop. I don't have picture of every one I've made as several was sewn on the markets.

I really love this headdress. It's so cute on both women and children. It covers the shoulders, back, breast and head and it's open in front. Compared to the regular kind of hood used in medieval reenactment the London hood is really nice especially for the women who has to wear other kind of headdresses. The hood is pretty all sized but I do make it in a smaller than on the pictures. In size 2-3 years. But normally the regular fits everybody.
A little research has shown that it has been used by men too, but men wearing a certain style of clothes that was very snug - all over Tongue

The basic London hood is very simple and I make it with and without lining and with a little band around the edges. Historically the little band isn't correct, I haven't found any sources on them at least. But as the band makes the hood fall much better - and more practically I make it that way. The edge is made heavier and the wind don't toss it around. Actually the one with band is most popular.

Here a red with slate gray edging (on my good friend Susanne - much more photogenic than me Tongue )




A yellow/slate gray just like the red, made for a local business woman who sells me the wonder wool:


The recent three for the market stand:



A green/green worn:


All is of course made in 100% wool. Edging in 100% wool. Lining in 100% flax.

I must admit I have one for use when I ride my bicycle in autumn and winter and it rocks^^ Cute, different and it warms better than just a hat.

What do you think?

love, pseudo

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SIMPLE TUTORIAL

So as planed and as many of you asked I'm adding a tut for the London hood. Firstly a bit about the historic pattern.
My pattern is based on the historic find in London. In a larger archaeological excavation in London a smaller hood was found IE the name.

Here is a picture of the original find:


Quote from this site (http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/londhd1b.html):
"Hood design based on no. 247, as presented in Textiles and Clothing. It was in a late 14th Century deposit, and was of a tabby woven cloth. Two triangular pieces, apparently cut from the "chin" of the hood, are inserted as gussets in the sides of the hood. The button "holes" are loops sewn into the edge."
Some Sources: Crowfoot, Elisabeth; Frances Pritchard and Kay Staniland. Textiles and Clothing, c.1150-c.1450. (Medieval Finds from Excavations in London: 4) London: HMSO, 1992.
Some Clothing of the Middle Ages - Hoods - London Hood, by I. Marc Carlson, Copyright 1996 This code is given for the free exchange of information, provided the Author's Name is included in all future revisions, and no money change hands.

My pattern is simply made in free hand and then smoothed and corrected - that I find the best way of making patterns unless you want to construct it with calculations and stuff.

Here picture of my children and adult pattern:


Here along with my pattern for little child and infant/doll:


Fabric choice
The hood is originally made in 100% wool. I normally make the in 100% as well. If with lining then either with thin wool (100%) or with 100% flax. I do this as it is historically correct. I have made a few in 2 layers of 100% flax - as summer/children version of the wool. Though one layer of wool is good in summer to.
If you want to make the hood in other kinds of fabric you should look for a thicker piece as some fabrics simply will fall too much around your head.

Fabric needed
My pattern is 47 cm (18.5") high therefore I need 1 meter (1.1 yd) if you wish the hood to have a folded seam on the head. If not you only need 50 cm (20").
If you want lining, the same measurements goes for that.

Sewing the darn thing



1. Sew red - if you have this seam and not a fold.
2. Sew green seam.
3. Sew yellow seam and blue seam. If you aren't good at sewing gussets ind 'just like that' here is a little suggestion: Sew the seam on each side and then sew the angle in one seam. I have found this to be best when learning others not so experienced in gussets to sew this hood. A picture to show it:



Important: you fit the gusset on the hood. Make sure to let the bottom of the gusset be aligned with the bottom of the hood.

Lining
Sew exactly like the hood. Hold the two right sides together, so you are looking at the wrong side, and sew around the edge. DO NOT sew all the way around - cos then you can't turn the thing ;P. Sew all sides but one of the two neckline seams. Turn the hood right side out and sew together the last seam in hand.

Edging
Is sew on just as the regular kind. A good idea if you cut out your own: cut it out in a 45 grades angle of the fabrics edge. Then it will be MUCH easier to fit where the pattern is curved.

Without edging
If you want to make a hood without lining and edging you fold the hood edge twice and then sew.

Buttonholes/straps
I normally make regular buttonholes sew in hand with buttonhole stitch. But the original was made with straps. The infant/doll hoods I sometimes make with a little ribbon instead.

Buttons, historically
There is a couple of ways of making buttons historically. The ones we use in my union is: 1. fabric buttons, 2. wooden buttons upholstered with fabric, 3. pewter buttons, 4. wooden buttons. Normally we use fabric buttons.
On the adult hood I normally make 5 buttons, but the red/slate gray has only two and it still works. Some hoods has several more.


I think that is all. If anything is missing or you need me to write more about one thing or the other pm me or ask here in the post Smiley

hood love, pseudo


PS. please share your London hoods! Post them on craftsters Smiley
« Last Edit: October 09, 2008 11:41:06 AM by EmilyFlew - Reason: edited to fit on hot new topics page! » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2008 01:23:57 PM »

These are super cute!  I could totally see myself wearing one of these hoods.  Is there any chance you'd be willing to offer a tutorial on these? 
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pseudo_pix
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2008 01:27:18 PM »

Sure I'll look at it tomorrow. It's super simple ^_^
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2008 01:28:37 PM »

I love this!  I'm definitely thinking about making one, now...
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2008 01:39:30 PM »

Those are very cute and warm looking!  I like that they are simple and classy, perfect for medieval reenactment or everyday.  Thanks for sharing!
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2008 01:42:23 PM »

Oooh, cute.  I want capes to come into fashion so badly.
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2008 01:43:17 PM »


 Historically the little band isn't correct, I haven't found any sources on them at least. But as the band makes the hood fall much better - and more practically I make it that way. The edge is made heavier and the wind don't toss it around.

Kudos, Psudo! IMHO, the lack of historical sources doesn't mean that yours isn't authentic -- some medieval seamstress somewhere probably ALSO figured out that the band makes the hood fall much better.

The gussets on the shoulders are so interesting... is there one at the center back, too?

Love the London hood. Or the Robin Hoodie? Grin
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aladine
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2008 01:49:17 PM »

omg i loove this!
please do write up a tut, i cant wait. if you dont, then ill have to coax you into a personal swap

ps. are you the girl on the first pic? if so, you look super... english, but not contemporary, more like right out of a painting ( i mean this as a compliment)  Smiley i bet ppl ask you all the time if they can draw your portrait
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« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2008 02:36:00 PM »

This is a really interesting design. It is attractive and has a sort of medieval look to it, yet looks really functional too. It looks as if it would keep you warm without messing up your hair as much as a hat might, and it looks fairly easy to fold up and carry when you don't need it. Plus I can totally see it in bright red on a little girl, making her look like Little Red Riding Hood.

I've never heard that term "London hood" before. Is the design taken from an archaeological find or a museum in London?
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« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2008 02:47:19 PM »

Extremely cute!
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