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Topic: How do you ease stitch?  (Read 35378 times)
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LD_1111
« on: September 26, 2008 08:15:44 PM »

I am making some cloth baby shoes from my son and the pattern calls for an ease stich to attach the top to the sole.  Can someone please explain to me how this is done?  I've looked online and the explanations I keep finding are just confusing.  Thanks!
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jennyleigh
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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2008 08:27:43 AM »

I'll attempt to explain ...

When instructions require you to "ease stitch," it means one piece has more curve and volume to it than the other to which you are connecting.  Set-in sleeves are a good example.  The sleeve itself is usually larger than the sleeve hole on the bodice, and you have to ease the excess to fit.

What some instructions tell you is to stitch in the seam line on the larger piece using a long or basting stitch.  On a sleeve you would stitch between a section, most of the time from the point the sleeve begins to curve on each side.  Hopefully your shoe instructions have told you the points between which to ease.

Next pin the two pieces together between the points where easing is necessary.  I pin at the beginning and end and one in the center.

After pinning, pull the bottom thread of the long stitched seam and gather until all the excess is consumed, and the two pieces are essentially the same (no gaps).  Evenly distribute any gathering along the entire seam.  You may have to remove the center pin to do this.

Now that the gathering is distributed (should be no large puckers or gathers), pin everything and stitch the two pieces together with your normal stitch length.  I always put the eased piece on the bottom.

Hope this helps.  If not, maybe someone can explain better than I.
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nothannah
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2009 08:50:33 AM »

Woohoo!  This is GREAT!  Will calm down now and go sew a robe. Grin
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N30Nb100d
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2009 02:42:50 PM »

I don't mean to hijack the thread but I had a similar problem, except with sleeves. I don't get how you fit all the extra fabric in there without getting tucks/gathers! I had about two inches worth of ease per sleeve, which seems ridiculous to me. Did this particular pattern include too much or is there some trick to not getting gathers that I'm missing?
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sewnutzz
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2009 07:47:06 PM »

I don't mean to hijack the thread but I had a similar problem, except with sleeves. I don't get how you fit all the extra fabric in there without getting tucks/gathers! I had about two inches worth of ease per sleeve, which seems ridiculous to me. Did this particular pattern include too much or is there some trick to not getting gathers that I'm missing?

One thing you can do is to use two lines of gathering threads on either side of the seam line (for ease of removal, use water soluable basting thread-WSBT- in the bobbin...just remember to change the bobbin when you stitch the seam!).  (Also, make sure you remember to mark your fabric as to where the ease threads start and stop.)
Two gathering lines gives you more control over the fullness of your gathers, and you can avoid getting tucks.  Some sleeves have more of a puff than others, and this trick is also helpful with them.

Once the seam is stitched to your satisfaction, your steam iron becomes your best friend.  Using a pressing ham (or a thickly rolled towl) to help you shape your armseye seam, _press_ (move the iron up and down, not back and forth, that distorts the fabric) to set your stitches, dissolve the WSBT, and press out any unsightly puckers.

Take time to test/practice on waste fabric.  Cut a arms eye and sleeve cap and go to town on it. 

Happy stitching!
Anne
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N30Nb100d
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2009 08:44:47 PM »

sewnutzz: I think I may need to spend some more time pressing the ones I already sewed in. Sounds like that might really help. I'll have to try the other suggestions too, next time I do sleeves. Thanks!!
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