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Topic: Glue for gluing things to Sculpey/Poly clay  (Read 20471 times)
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Craft The World
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« on: August 19, 2008 10:05:36 AM »

I tried to look through the FAQ for this, and it's just such a mish-mash!

Okay, so I am making an Altoids tin covered in Sculpey. I've baked it, and painted it, but I had a piece of bamboo that I had compressed into the clay, which fell off after baking. The indent of where the bamboo had been is still there, and the clay is baked, so I really just need to know: what kind of glue can I use to make this REALLY secured to my box?

I'm on a time limit, too, this is for a swap, so someone heeeeelp!
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I am always open to personal swaps...I'm always on the lookout for new bags, shawls, punk/steampunk accessories, Altoids tins, etc. As a professional illustrator/fine artist, I can offer something crafty, or something more artsy. Let's talk!
Dolly Mixx
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2008 10:40:38 AM »

Epoxy resin glue will work the best, but superglue is pretty good, but can get brittle and fall off after a time.
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something_wierd
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« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2008 12:45:06 PM »

I've found that E6000 glue works really well.  Clear epoxies usually work, too.  I'm always very wary about using cyanoacrylate (super) glue because it can do some interesting things, like get brittle.  It can also develop fingerprints that may be on your piece.  The last thing most people want on their pieces that they worked so hard on is a big white print.  Wink

For your purpose, I think that a small dab (less than a drop) of cyanoacrylate glue will do just fine.  If you are paranoid or have seen fingerprints developed with glue before like I have, I recommend you wipe down the surface well with rubbing alcohol to help remove prints.  Glue when it is completely dry.  I've learned this the hard way. Tongue

May I ask what FAQ you were using?
« Last Edit: August 19, 2008 12:45:53 PM by something_wierd » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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Diane B.
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« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2008 01:10:44 PM »

Various glues should work between acrylic paint (since you coated your clay in paint) and bamboo, but your bamboo may be pretty slick and therefore act like a non-porous material rather than a porous one.

The strongest bond will come from a 2-part epoxy glue (the longer the set time, the stronger the bond), and polyurethane glue (Gorilla Glue, e.g.) would be even stronger (clamp and don't let the glue ooze out while it's curing enough to show).  You could also use liquid clay and rebake.  Other glues that could work well would be E-6000/Goop or a strong white glue like Wellbond or GemTac or Jewel It (but sand or rough up the bamboo before using a white glue). 

You might want to check out this page at my site about all the "glues" that are usually used with polymer clay:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/glues-Diluent.htm

(And this page has lots of lessons on covering Altoid tins as well as other things, so you can see what other people have used at least between raw clay and metal:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm
...click on "Altoid Tins," under the Metal category)

Quote
I am making an Altoids tin covered in Sculpey.

Just be aware that you've used a brand/line of polymer clay that's weak after baking in any thin or projecting areas (an Altoid clay covering would certainly qualify as thin), so your clay may well break or crack.  Your clay will get even more stress than usual too because the metal of the lid in particular will definitely flex in use.  If you used a lot of acrylic paint, or an acrylic sealer, that could give a bit more strength but you'll still want to be careful with the tin. 
(I'd recommend a clay that's stronger after baking for any coverings you do in the future though rather than Sculpey, SuperSculpey, or Sculpey III --e.g., Kato Polyclay, FimoClassic, Premo, SuperSculpey-Firm which comes in gray only if you just want to paint over the baked clay, Cernit, or even FimoSoft.)


HTH,

Diane B.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2008 01:16:04 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2008 02:15:56 PM »

Hi...

The FAQ's: I tried to look through the ones at the beginning of the poly clay section.

The glue: I ended up using Guerilla glue and it worked great. I'm used to the way it expands, so I was ready for that.

I didn't realize Sculpey is so much more weak than other clays. I've never had a problem with it, but I don't do much delicate work. I use it because it's so easy to knead and I have bad hands. I'm going to try out some premo this week, but I don't understand...! Premo is by Sculpey, too! So confusing, this world of poly clay. Smiley
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I am always open to personal swaps...I'm always on the lookout for new bags, shawls, punk/steampunk accessories, Altoids tins, etc. As a professional illustrator/fine artist, I can offer something crafty, or something more artsy. Let's talk!
Diane B.
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« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2008 10:34:39 AM »

Quote
I didn't realize Sculpey is so much more weak than other clays.... I've never had a problem with it, but I don't do much delicate work.

First, when most people say "Sculpey" they usually mean Sculpey III (small bars of colors) --or sometimes they mean Sculpey (bulk, white or terracotta) or SuperSculpey (bulk, flesh-colored) --see more on the lines of Sculpey below.

None of those three are best to use for baked strength when there will be any thin areas or projecting areas. They also won't be best to use when the most detail and the most precision are wanted for sculpts or canes, etc, because of their handling characteristics and lack of firmness.

Rounded (and often very small) items made from those 3 lines will be fine strength-wise after baking, but they'll still have some detail/precision problems while raw when those qualities are wanted.

Quote
I use it because it's so easy to knead and I have bad hands.


I also have considerable problems with my hands (arms and chest too), but using a pasta machine (for conditioning, as well as for other things), and softeners when needed, keeps that from being a problem for me at all when using stiffer clays. 
I'd also recommend buying a pasta machine motor to anyone with physical problems (or to anyone who just who does a lot of clay work).  Using a motor eliminates all the work (even turning the handle).  Motors are not cheap but so totally worth it to many people!

Once the clay is conditioned, very few people have sufficiently-bad strength problems, etc., in their hands that they can't use the firmer clays... and those clays are much more satisfying to shape with once conditioned.


Quote
I'm going to try out some premo this week, but I don't understand...! Premo is by Sculpey, too! So confusing, this world of poly clay

Ok.  Here's the deal (and yes, it's quite confusing--ahem, sometimes by design  Roll Eyes):
 
So...Polyform is the manufacturer of all polymer clays with "Sculpey" in their name. (Some use the word Sculpey as part of the name, some don't so much.)
Polyform puts out a number of lines of polymer clay though, some of which have very different characteristics, and many come only in one color.

Sculpey was the first clay made by Polyform (btw, it's called Polyform clay in art supply stores--a much more "serious" name than Sculpey-- which was later improved a bit, colored, then sold in craft stores as a kids' toy with the name Sculpey III).
This "original" Sculpey is sold in bulk, in sizes from 2 lbs to about 50 lbs I think.  It used to come only in white, but now it's also sold in a terracotta color.  Sculpey is even weaker and softer post-bake in thin areas than SuperSculpey and Sculpey III.  It's also the cheapest.

SuperSculpey is a fairly translucent, flesh-colored clay that's also sold in bulk (1 lb).  Small amounts of it can even be used to soften harder clays or to make a color go farther since it's largely translucent clay (tinted pink-ish a little bit).

Sculpey III comes in many colors, and is sold in packages of small bars (2 oz).

All 3 of those lines do bake up very "hard" though (which unfortunately also correlates with lack of strength in thin areas).


Premo was the next clay that Polyform manufactured, I think.  This clay was developed by a clayer though (using the Polyform chemist) so was quite different from the other "Sculpeys."
(Btw, Premo is referred to as Premo! Sculpey only by its manufacturers so that they can associate it with their other lines... it's also referred to with that name by authors/etc., who must do that.  Hardly anyone else uses that name because Premo is such a different polymer clay than the other Polyform lines.)
 
That clayer, Marie Segal, was a seller and user of Fimo but wasn't satisfied with her dealings with the manufacturer (Eberhard Faber) and wanted to have a new clay she could use and also feel good about selling.  So she created her new clay with the characteristics preferred by "serious" clayers which for one thing meant that it was strong in thin areas like they were and also was firmer than the Sculpeys but she did make it easier to condition than the old Fimo). 
She also created the color names of her clay to largely mimic the names of artists' oil paints so that mixing colors would be easier and also more colors would be possible (as part of that, she created two sets of the three primary colors... a "warm" set and a "cool" set... for example, for the yellows that translates to Lemon Yellow--cool and Cadmium Yellow--warm).

*Premo has always been somewhat "heat-responsive" so not good for people with hot hands, etc., but lately it's also undergone a formula change which made it too sticky for many clayers (Marie is no longer associated with Polyform).  There was such an outcry from clayers that Polyform has corrected the formula, but both versions are probably on the shelves in many places (no simple way to tell them apart, but if a bar is really soft I'd avoid it).

Polyform also makes other clays, some being special-purpose:

Bake and Bend (colored)... somewhat flexible after baking... Polyform had problems with ink on the packaging getting sloppy looking so right now Bake and Bend can be found only in kits

Eraser Clay (colored)... stays somewhat softer than other lines after baking so it can be used to erase many pencil marks

Studio By Sculpey (colored)... very new clay not yet widely available... developed for special classes to be taught by Donna Dewberry and their franchisees for making "home dec" items ... has a fabric-y feel, won't stick easily to itself ...no dark or deep colors or translucent/metallics, etc... reasonable post-bake strength in thin areas, at least in the beginning (whole story not in yet)

SuperSculpy-Firm (gray)...somewhat firm clay when raw... strong after baking though, even in thin areas

UltraLight (white)... marshmallowy feel when raw... lighter weight after baking so good for armatures under regular polymer clay or for making things that "float" ...reasonably strong after baking?

MoldMaker (beige, I think)... somewhat flexible clay similar to Bake and Bend... sold for making (somewhat flexible) molds though surface not as smooth as regular clay or 2-part silicones or some other molding materials 
 
(There are also various kits with half-bars of Sculpey III, Premo, Bake and Bend, and Eraser clay.) 

Of all of those lines of Polyform polymer clays, the ones most often used these days are:
Premo
Sculpey III
SuperSculpey
SuperSculpey-Firm


Hope that sorts some of it out for you!

Diane B.





« Last Edit: August 27, 2008 11:30:32 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
TwistMySister
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2013 09:53:03 PM »

Im trying to glue metal hair pins to poly clay items and they just snap right off, Im using an epoxy resin 2 part mix and it is adhering to everything else but poly clay!

Im going to try a plastics glue next. Yikes..... who knew it would be so hard!
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2013 04:28:22 PM »

E6000!  It's my favourite glue to buy.  You don't need to mix it like epoxy glue, but it is still industrial strength and super affordable.  I've had things glued with super glue and other types of non- epoxies, and things fall off, but I've never had anything fall off with E6000.  Or, if you can find some (that is affordable) silicone.  (my problem is that I can never find silicone in regular stores in Canada, only speciality and model stores where it is more expensive than I'm willing to pay).
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2013 09:17:02 AM »

Personally, I would just use any glue gun
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