A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Need help? Click the HELP link at the top of the screen to read the docs or ask at the Help Desk.
Total Members: 302,059
Currently Running With Scissors:
586 Guests and 26 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: 1 2 [All]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Baker's Ammonia  (Read 8759 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
oneyedsally
Offline Offline

Posts: 597
Joined: 30-Jul-2007

Fabric is taking over my house!


View Profile available for personal swaps
« on: August 14, 2008 02:30:11 PM »

Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum since I'm not really much of a cook. But I do love to bake and have recently started making lots of pies and cakes and cookies every weekend! (Unfortunately I tend to eat it all too, I'm not too happy with the scale right now.)

Well anyways, I've been dying to bake these cookies my Aunt Mary used to make every Christmas when I was little. I say she's my aunt but she's actually my grandma's aunt so she's like almost 100 years old! She's in a nursing home now and hasn't made them for years. I have her recipe and it calls for baker's ammonia. Does anyone know where to buy this? My grandma says you can typically find it in drug stores, but I live in Ohio and all we have are CVS and Walgreen's. In West Virginia (where Aunt Mary lives) there are still family owned stores that carry it but I've never seen it up here. Has anyone heard of this product and know where I can buy it?

Thanks!  Grin
THIS ROCKS   Logged

If you like handmade bags and purses, check out my etsy!

http://londonpurple.etsy.com

My blog http://londonpurple.blogspot.com
GenaG
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2008 06:44:21 PM »

I am new too, but being that I LOVE to cook pretty much anything and being a Chemist.... I HAD to know what this stuff was too. I have never heard of it either.  Embarrassed

Here is a link to some off the net
http://kitchenkrafts.com/product.asp?pn=IN0083&sid=GOOGLE&TID=GL9120243&gclid=CL_Btb_bjpUCFRJdxwodxyhwgQ&bhcd2=1218764454

Apparently it is "Leavening agent called for in some cream puff, cookie, and springerle recipes. It is also called hartshorn and leaves no unpleasant alkaline off-flavor in your baked goods."

Well how about that. There you go.  Wink
THIS ROCKS   Logged
oneyedsally
Offline Offline

Posts: 597
Joined: 30-Jul-2007

Fabric is taking over my house!


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2008 07:07:59 PM »

Thanks for the link GenaG! Kind of pricey though with shipping...it's only a dollar less than the product itself! I don't know about $15 minimum for only 2.7 oz.

I've been doing a TON of research on it too (I am a chemical engineer!) and apparently it's what makes the cookies crisp, I remember it smells pretty bad while baking but you can't taste it in the finished cookie. Normal baking powder can be substituted but would produce softer cookies.

Now I am trying to remember what my aunt called them. We are of German ancestry, but all of the German recipes I find call for peppermint and mine has lemon. She just wrote "ammonia cookies" on the recipe but she called them something different that was definitely another language. I guess that would be my second question, does anyone know what the cookie is called?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

If you like handmade bags and purses, check out my etsy!

http://londonpurple.etsy.com

My blog http://londonpurple.blogspot.com
MizMosa
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2008 01:05:05 PM »


Now I am trying to remember what my aunt called them. We are of German ancestry, but all of the German recipes I find call for peppermint and mine has lemon. She just wrote "ammonia cookies" on the recipe but she called them something different that was definitely another language. I guess that would be my second question, does anyone know what the cookie is called?

Maybe you're talking about springerle?

http://www.thespringerlebaker.com/ken_recipes.html
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Amastra
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2008 04:28:16 AM »

I know the stuff ur talkin' about!!
Here in Norway we call it "hornsalt-' or 'hjortetakksalt' as in.. salt from the horns of a deer..cause it used to be made of them..

 Need me to send u some? its really cheap and u can get it everywhere! just send me a message.

http://www.matvareguiden.no/bilder/765.gif
« Last Edit: August 25, 2008 10:40:28 AM by jungrrl - Reason: Please do not hotlink images - thanks! » THIS ROCKS   Logged

swapstalkers; amastra.blogg.com Cheesy:D:D
Book Worm
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2008 09:05:05 AM »

I bet you can order it from Sur La Table, they may even have one where you live. They are an excellent source for all your fussy cooking needs.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle- Plato
crochetedkitten
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2008 10:01:28 AM »

What are the chances that you would post the recipe?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Life Is Short, Crochet Naked!
kimmy_sue05
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2008 11:41:35 AM »

I never knew that they had a such thing a s baker's ammonia wow you learn something new everyday
THIS ROCKS   Logged
oneyedsally
Offline Offline

Posts: 597
Joined: 30-Jul-2007

Fabric is taking over my house!


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2008 02:50:24 PM »

I sent you a message Amastra!


Maybe you're talking about springerle?

http://www.thespringerlebaker.com/ken_recipes.html

That might be it, except we've never used those beautiful molds. I wish I had some though, how pretty!

What are the chances that you would post the recipe?

Here you go ellen-j! I think this makes at least 10 or 12 dozen. There is a LOT of flour in this recipe! Last time we made this it was literally a whole day of baking and there were 3 people. One to roll, one to use the cookie cutters, one to bake.

3 cups sugar
2 eggs
1 pt milk
1 oz baker's ammonia
1 cup shortening
small bottle oil of lemon
pinch of salt
enough flour for stiff dough (5 lb)

Roll out thin. Bake at 350 degrees until brown.

And that's all she wrote! They puff up really thick even if the dough is rolled out thin. We always put a few sprinkles on top too, the colored sugar crystal kind.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

If you like handmade bags and purses, check out my etsy!

http://londonpurple.etsy.com

My blog http://londonpurple.blogspot.com
supercake
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2008 12:25:52 PM »

thank you wikipedia! as i had never heard of baker's ammoina either.

Ammonium carbonate is the commercial salt, formerly known as sal volatile or salt of hartshorn. Ammonium carbonate is used when crushed as a smelling salt. It can be crushed when needed in order to revive someone that has fainted. It is also known as "baker's ammonia" and was a forerunner to the more modern leavening agents baking soda and baking powder.
As well as in smelling salts, as mentioned, ammonium carbonate is still used for leavening in particular recipes, particular northern European and Scandinavian. It can sometimes be susbstituted with baking powder, but the finished product will never be as airy and light as the original recipe. Icelandic loftkkur (air biscuits) for instance simply cannot be made with anything other than ammonium carbonate.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium_carbonate

Buckleys cough syrup from Canada also uses ammonium carbonate as an active ingredient intended to help relieve symptoms of bronchitis.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Kanhoro
Offline Offline

Posts: 598
Joined: 19-Feb-2008

Xander of Wolven-Knit~


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2008 12:28:49 PM »

http://www.godecookery.com/cookies/infoba.html
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,bakers_amonia,FF.html

my dad just made alot of fried dough it was great lol.
http://www.beachloverkitchen.com/2008/06/chinese-cruller-yauh-char-kwai.html
http://auntyyochana.blogspot.com/2007/03/yu-char-kway.html

i think i read somewhere that baker's ammounia needs heat for "puffyness" instead of a chemical reaction such as baking soda?
« Last Edit: September 21, 2008 12:39:09 PM by Kanhoro » THIS ROCKS   Logged

hp_nerd
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2008 03:12:07 PM »


Buckleys cough syrup from Canada also uses ammonium carbonate as an active ingredient intended to help relieve symptoms of bronchitis.

Yay Canada/Buckley's!  It's really popular here, but it tastes like... worse than anything, ever.  In the whole world.  Wonder if it's because of this stuff? 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

The cure for anything is salt water.  Sweat, tears, or the sea." -Isak Dinesen

Personal Swap?

My Wist.
Bastelmutti
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2008 07:37:29 PM »

Not sure about the name of the cookies, but I think the substance itself is called Hirschhornsalz in German. I remember seeing it in recipes my grandma had in a cookbook from Germany.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
breton777
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2008 04:11:16 PM »

In your recipe, small bottle of oil of lemmon, where do you get this and how much is it as in ounces?

Rapunzele
THIS ROCKS   Logged

LAUGHTER is timeless, IMAGINATION has no age and DREAMS are forever
oneyedsally
Offline Offline

Posts: 597
Joined: 30-Jul-2007

Fabric is taking over my house!


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2008 11:10:04 AM »

In your recipe, small bottle of oil of lemmon, where do you get this and how much is it as in ounces?

Rapunzele

Sorry, I have no idea how much the recipe actually requires! Even the amount of flour is pretty vague - "enough for a stiff dough". My guess would be to add the same amount as you would if this were vanilla extract in sugar cookies, just scale it up because the recipe makes at least 10 dozen cookies. If the first batch isn't to your liking, you can always add more to the rest of the dough.

Or, there are many similar recipes online as well so you could just google "ammonia cookies" and look at several recipes. Then you can pick the one with the amount you like best. Sorry I can't be of more help! My family is pretty lax about measurements in cooking and baking (I can't ever remember using measuring cups to make pancakes!), and my Aunt Mary passed away last month so she took the secrets of these cookies to the grave!

*** Baker's Ammonia supplier update to anyone who is interested. I called most of the imported food stores in my area and one of them sounded like they carry it! I haven't had a chance to stop in yet, it's kind of far from my house. I also found a local grocer who would order it if I wanted.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

If you like handmade bags and purses, check out my etsy!

http://londonpurple.etsy.com

My blog http://londonpurple.blogspot.com
Threads you might like:
Pages: 1 2 [All] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Kale, Red Cabbage and Carrot Slaw Recipe
7 Essential Thanksgiving Cooking Hacks
How to Make Individual-Serving Nachos for Your Next Tailgate
Leftover Thanksgiving Dinner Panini Recipe
Gluten Free Stuffing Recipe
Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Lamp Transformation
Book Review: Handmade for Baby
Tute Tuesday: Warm Those Piggies!

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2015, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.