A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: When you post a project, it's easier for people to discover it if you choose a great title for your thread.
Total Members: 296,384
Currently Running With Scissors:
672 Guests and 35 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Putting Cane to Work  (Read 1022 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
chum
Just Craft!
Offline Offline

Posts: 34
Joined: 02-Aug-2008

Can't Deny, Computer Geek


View Profile available for personal swaps
« on: August 10, 2008 11:32:25 PM »

Okay this will be my first posting for showing a completed craft and it was with help from beadizzygrl's Cane Tutorial and Diane B.
I still struggled with a few things, I did not make the first rolls tall enough and I could not find the right cutting tool once I got everything mashed together. Once I did find the right cutting tool I discovered that it made all of the difference.
I also had a lot of problems with the design blending and blurring when I put two pieces together.

Along with this experimentation I was curious to see how flexible without breaking the material was, and it seemed that it had no problem being screwed into a board.
So far I am very excited with the new medium and continue to add new ideas to my journal.


I would love your critiques, suggestions and opinions.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2008 11:33:25 PM by chum » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Everything has beauty, it is just how we choose to see it.
ladyquestra
Offline Offline

Posts: 103
Joined: 07-Jul-2008

I am my intention trapped in flesh and bone.


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2008 12:55:41 AM »

I think these are great.  I like your play with color, texture and depth.  How did you bake the pen, and can the fork be run through a washing or is it strictly for decoration?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Be who you are and do what you want, because those who matter don't care and those who care don't matter.
~Dr. Suess
kaleesi
Craftaholic
Offline Offline

Posts: 3614
Joined: 29-Jan-2005

Rae'Lynn Grace - 5 months old


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2008 03:48:33 AM »

beautiful cane! Love the colors! Love it on the fork!
I don't know if it is dishwasher safe or not - I bet you can find the answer on Diane B's site!

I do know when I made my angel coins out of polyclay I would accidentally wash them in my pockets once in a while and they would survive washer and dryer just fine - never had a problem with that.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

I have a gorgeous granddaughter Smiley

Not allowed to craft without supervision Wink
God is big enough.....
chum
Just Craft!
Offline Offline

Posts: 34
Joined: 02-Aug-2008

Can't Deny, Computer Geek


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2008 08:12:20 AM »

yes the fork was a test as well. I wanted to see how it would do in everyday life use Wink So far my husband has claimed it as his favorite fork and has used it at every meal. I asked him about the weight of it and he said it was good, and it has been through several washings and tossings. We do not have a dishwasher. So it gets tossed into the wash basin and then washed by hand with boiling water. No problem as of yet.
The pen was another interesting experiment. I read to use a bic pen and remove the ink.
Ahh, but alas, not all bic pens are equal. They must be the true hard plastic bic, as the other orange plastic melted and burst the polymer in the oven.
also noted, the polymer on the fork was slightly "harder" than on the pen. My assumption here is that the fork was hotter and cooked the polymer more?!
I am still a bit worried that I have curred it long enough to remove the elasticizers (is that correct Diane B.?), but I had it in the oven for 15-20 minutes and it was very hard when cooled.  (I once over cooked some polymer and it lost its color and was as hard as a rock (brittle) when cooled).
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Everything has beauty, it is just how we choose to see it.
Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2008 09:58:21 AM »

Wow, you covered a lot of different polymer clay techniques with your first stuff!  All very nice Grin and they show you have good design ideas too.  I think once you learn some of the tricks for working with this new medium (including mixing colors), you'll be doing creative stuff that's more "finished" and more what you probably see in your head, as well as perhaps stronger.

Btw, is that yellow braided cord a drawer handle??


You asked for critique and suggestions, so here goes!  Cheesy:

Quote
I was curious to see how flexible without breaking the material was. . . .

Different brands and lines of polymer clay differ in their baked characteristics.

Basically, Sculpey, Super-Sculpey and Sculpey III will be "hardest" after baking, but in thin or projecting areas they will sacrifice strength for that surface hardness and be more brittle/breakable. 
Most of the other brands/lines will be flexible in thin or projecting areas, and much stronger (with FimoSoft pulling up the rear).
 
However, any brand/line of polymer clay will get stronger the longer it's baked (therefore the more completely every bit of the clay is fully polymerized).  That can make the weaker clays somewhat stronger but still not strong enough for many uses, which is one reason those who really get into polymer clay seldom use them (except perhaps for flesh-colored SuperSculpey for faces/hands/etc-- though even SS can be mixed with a stronger clay and/or used over armatures for more strength in any thin areas).
There's more info on all that on my (temporarily-problematic) Characteristics of Clays page, under Strength--Flexibility, Rigidity:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/Characteristics.htm

The twisted ropes you used for hair may be a problem too since they're projecting (unless they never get stressed).  Even if you did use a stronger clay for them, things like that can be a problem, so they're often pressed down to the surface of the piece as much as possible to lower their profile, or they have armatures under them (wire, for example), or they're mixed with Bake and Bend polymer clay.

Quote
. . . had no problem being screwed into a board. .

Polymer clay is strong enough to be screwed into (or drilled) even when thin and shouldn't break (as long as a strong brand is used--Sculpey/etc wouldn't be good unless you barely screw the screws onto the surface or into a pre-drilled hole).   
You might want to paint your screw heads though, or cover them with a bit of clay to match the background or with clay that's just decorative. 
There's some info on doing those things on this page since screws/bolts have to be tightened against the clay when attaching clay-covered switchplates back to a switch box in the wall:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm
(...click on Switchplates under Plastics, then scroll down to Screws & Holes)

There will often be better ways of attaching clay embellishments to things though... e.g., a single screw (for a drawer knob perhaps) can be embedded into the back side of the clay, or pieces can be hung (with invisible hangers) instead of screwed in, or inset holes can be used so that baked clay plugs can be glued into the holes once the screws are in place, etc.  There are also temporary adhesives and putties that can be used to mount things if permanent ones aren't allowable.

Quote
it has been through several washings and tossings. We do not have a dishwasher. So it gets tossed into the wash basin and then washed by hand with boiling water. No problem as of yet.

Polymer clay does fine in the washer/dryer/dishwasher from the heat**, though you probably don't want to use actual boiling water more than briefly only because the clay will begin to soften a bit if left at that temp for long.  The weaker clays though may not take too much stress from being pressed or banged by other things in a dishwasher, etc. if they're thin, and so could break. 
All clays however could get mini-scratches if they're buffeted around against sharp surfaces or edges very much.  In general though, covered silverware and other cooking tools do fine in a dishwasher.

**in fact, some people even have even buffed some of their (pre-sanded) polymer items like beads in the dryer on purpose

Quote
Ahh, but alas, not all bic pens are equal. They must be the true hard plastic bic, as the other orange plastic melted and burst the polymer in the oven.

Yep, the Bic you want is the one called Round Stic --which is actually not the hardest Bic.  The type of plastic used for the Round Stic can tolerate higher temps, and also won't shrink. 
Papermate has a similar cheap pen but it's tapered and can be harder to cover, especially for beginners. 
Other pen brands will work too but it's not always obvious which they'll be without actually trying one.  There's a partial list of brands though on my Pens page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/pens.htm (click on Brands)

Quote
the polymer on the fork was slightly "harder" than on the pen. My assumption here is that the fork was hotter and cooked the polymer more?!

If you used the same brand of clay for both, then the fork covering may have been harder because the clay was thicker or because the armature underneath was more rigid.  Or you could have cured it longer, as you mentioned.

Quote
I am still a bit worried that I have curred it long enough to remove the elasticizers (is that correct Diane B.?), but I had it in the oven for 15-20 minutes and it was very hard when cooled.  (I once over cooked some polymer and it lost its color and was as hard as a rock (brittle) when cooled).

There's no way to really tell after baking only from feel or look whether polymer clay has completely cured all the way through.
If it hasn't been cured thoroughly, you may notice over time that some of the uncured plasticizer will leach out ...if the item has been sitting on a porous surface, it will leave an oily spot; if it's been sitting on some kinds of plastic, the clay and the plastic can begin dissolving leaving a gooey mess.  In some cases the baked item alone could actually become crumbly and begin to fall apart.

The only real help is to use a cheapie oven thermometer next to the clay (after testing all areas of your oven for hot spots), always preheat, then be sure to bake for at least the recommended time per the item's thickest area. 
Baking longer isn't great for those Sculpeys mentioned though because they will begin to darken then even at their recommended temps --though partially or completely enclosing them while baking can help. 
You'll also want to be careful of the materials you're baking on because some can heat up to a higher temp than the air around them.  There's loads of info on all those factors on my Baking page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/baking.htm

Quote
I did not make the first rolls tall enough and I could not find the right cutting tool once I got everything mashed together. Once I did find the right cutting tool I discovered that it made all of the difference.
I also had a lot of problems with the design blending and blurring when I put two pieces together.

Not sure what you mean about the rolls (canes?) being "tall" enough.  Do you mean that you just didn't make enough of the cane, or reduce it enough, or what?

You can find loads of info on cane-making in general on this page, including Cutting Canes and putting things together, etc:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/Canes--general.htm
And info on reducing canes (making them smaller), especially to reduce distortion, etc:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/canes--reducing.htm
And even more on the types of blades that are best for various uses:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/cutters-blades.htm (click on Types under Blades)


Love the face btw! (if you didn't use a mold for that, then you'll really be enjoying more sculpting too  Grin). And like the way you've handled it. 
If you want to check out some other faces that have been used alone then embellished (lotsa possibilities!), check out some of the links on this page too:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/heads_masks.htm
(...click on Faces Used Alone...)

P.S. You may want to check out some of the suggestions I wrote recently for "drawing" lines without unevenness, etc.:
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=262391.msg2942918#msg2942918
I think you'll find they can work well without creating the same problems.


Can't wait to see what you do next!!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2008 04:29:25 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Genesis1:1
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2008 03:44:53 PM »

Love the canes!  I must try the pen , thanks for all the info!
THIS ROCKS   Logged
beadizzygrl
Tutorial Contributor

My Perty Thangs......If the green light is on, I am home!!
Offline Offline

Posts: 2278
Joined: 06-Jul-2006

MONSTER good luck coming my way!


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2008 06:55:26 PM »

Wow, I love your cane covered silver ware!!
Everything looks great!!
 Grin
Thanks for sharing!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Gina
I am not obsessed with Perty Thangs, I am disciplined...

I have alot to share, all you gotta do is ask.

 
Crochet, x-stitch, Ribbon embroidery, plastic canvas, beadwork, polymer clay, wire work, and now TATTING!!  Please help me learn to knit, then I might be complete.
chum
Just Craft!
Offline Offline

Posts: 34
Joined: 02-Aug-2008

Can't Deny, Computer Geek


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2008 09:59:18 AM »

Diane B. yes indeed, the yellow chord (really gang line for our dog team) belongs to a door handle. My husband is an eclectic artist at heart and will do nothing "normal." Smiley Which is why I married him. Smiley


THIS ROCKS   Logged

Everything has beauty, it is just how we choose to see it.
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Brownie-Ice Cream Sandwich Recipe
How to Make French Meringue with Plums
‘Taste of Home’ Magazine’s Peach-Rosemary Cobbler Recipe
How to Make a Raspberry, Strawberry and Mango Terrine
Sweet Melon Granita Recipe
Latest Blog Articles
DIY Summer
Craft Challenge 101 Announced - Stash Buster
July 8, 2014 Featured Projects

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.