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Topic: Help with gauge  (Read 772 times)
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Joined: 27-Jan-2004

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« on: February 11, 2004 09:20:30 AM »

I have a question about checking one's gauge.  I want to use a yarn other than the one suggested for that cute little cardigan in SNB.  I have a beautiful fingering weight mohair, so I doubled it and made a test swatch using the size 4 needles suggested for the cardigan.  The rows come out right on target, but the width is a little short of 4 inches.  I can stretch it to make 4 inches easily enough.  My question is -- is there a way to cast on that will give me a bit more width?  Is that the way to get around this problem?  Or is there something else that I, as a newbie, just don't know about?  If anybody has run across this problem, I'd love to hear how you solved it because I really want to use this yarn for this sweater.


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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2004 09:23:49 AM »

actually, the width gauge is more important than the row gauge, as most knitting instructions tell you to cast on a specific number of stitches to get the width right, but then to knit to a certain number of *inches* to get the length (meaning, however many rows it takees you). I would think that a fingering weight yarn would be a bit light for that sweater, since the original was knit in a sport weight yarn. I'd try bumping up your needle size, to size 5, then try 6. You want to measure your gauge, by the way, after knitting a few inches and making sure that you've gotten substantially far enough away from your cast-on edge (which may very well pull in) to get an accurate measurement.

Knit on!
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2004 11:13:37 AM »

You could also try tripling the yarn.  When you go up a few needle sizes (I don't know how short of 4 inches you are) your fabric may be too open for a sweater.  

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